SINGER FURNITURE COMPANY : FURNITURE COMPANY

SINGER FURNITURE COMPANY : ASIAN INFLUENCED FURNITURE : AFFORDABLE TEAK FURNITURE.

Singer Furniture Company


singer furniture company
    furniture company
  • a company that sells furniture
    singer
  • United States writer (born in Poland) of Yiddish stories and novels (1904-1991)
  • A person who sings, esp. professionally
  • United States inventor of an improved chain-stitch sewing machine (1811-1875)
  • a person who sings

14 Wall Street Building
14 Wall Street Building
Financial District, Lower Manhattan The 14 Wall Street Building, with its distinctive pyramidal roof, is one of the great towers that define the lower Manhattan skyline. Located in the heart of the financial district, the building was erected in 1910-12 for the Bankers Trust Company. Symbolizing the importance of the company, the 539-foot high 14 Wall Street Building was the tallest bank building in the world when it was completed. Designed by the prestigious firm of Trowbridge & Livingston, this granite-clad tower incorporated the latest in building technologies and was one of the first buildings to employ a cofferdam foundation system. Inspired by the campanile of San Marco in Venice, the building's design is notable for its austere decorative scheme incorporating specific Greek architectural motifs. Especially noteworthy is the seven-story stepped pyramid which is credited with setting an important precedent for the development of boldly topped skyscraper towers. In 1931-33 the building received a twenty-five-story, L-shaped addition, designed by the leading architectural firm of Shreve, Lamb & Harmon. The addition is articulated with a blend of Modern Classic and Art Deco motifs which complements Trowbridge & Livingston's original design. Over the years the 14 Wall Street Building has become a symbol of the financial district. Its design was widely copied during the 1920s and remains an inspiration for modern designers. The site of the 14 Wall Street Building at the northwest corner of Wall and Nassau Streets was one of the most desirable in the financial district due to its location at a broad intersection which was "almost equivalent to a public square in area." Its distinguished neighbors included the adjacent Hanover Bank Building on Nassau Street, the U.S. Sub-Treasury in the old Custom House across Nassau Street, and the nearby New York Stock Exchange and J.P. Morgan & Company in the Drexel Building on Broad Street. In order to obtain an adequate return on the cost of the property which had been purchased at a record price for New York real estate, the owners decided to erect a tall building.14 Given the almost square proportions of the site, which had a frontage of 97 feet on Wall Street and 94 feet on Nassau Street, and the proposed 539-feet height of the structure, Trowbridge & Livingston chose to treat the building as a tower, "indicating on the exterior the offices of the company by a colonnade, and enhancing the beauty of the upper part of building by a loggia and a stone pyramid, in place of the usual flat or mansard roof." The overall design of the granite-clad tower was based on the fifteenth-century campanile of San Marco in Venice, a model first used by Bruce Price in an unexecuted but widely published design for the Sun Building of 1890 and first realized by Napoleon LeBrun & Sons in the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower in 1907-09. As Sarah Bradford Landau observed in her history of the New York skyscraper, the 14 Wall Street "building departed from earlier such towers by virtue of its granite-clad roof and its specifically Greek architectural motifs." The architects indicated that they had adopted the Greek style because of its adaptability to the problems of modern practice and because "its simplicity and grace, as well as its supreme dignity and seriousness combine to make it peculiarly appropriate to the location and the purpose of the building."17 Sources for the design included the Ionic order on the Erechtheum at the Acropolis, ancient Macedonian prototypes,18 and reconstruction drawings of the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, the model for the stepped-pyramid temple which crowns the building, giving it its distinctive profile against the skyline. The windowless pyramid housed record rooms and storage spaces as well as the building's mechanical equipment including the main smoke stack which vented through openings in the apex of the pyramid producing "an effect not unlike a volcano in action." Trowbridge & Livingston's skillful handling of the aesthetic problems presented by the project was widely praised by the architectural critics of the day. The need to treat the lower part of the building to indicate not one but two banking offices was addressed by treating the first story and basement which were originally to house the Mercantile Trust Company as a high stylobate supporting the colonnaded floors that housed the Bankers Trust Company. Because the lower part of the building could only be seen from a comparatively short distance, the design of the base had to be scaled for close inspection yet still be appropriate for one of the tallest structures in the city. As Architecture magazine noted, This was done by the use of a Grecian order with fluted columns of exquisite refinement but great size; of belt courses delicately modeled, and with moldings under cut suf
14 Wall Street Building
14 Wall Street Building
Financial District, Manhattan The 14 Wall Street Building, with its distinctive pyramidal roof, is one of the great towers that define the lower Manhattan skyline. Located in the heart of the financial district, the building was erected in 1910-12 for the Bankers Trust Company. Symbolizing the importance of the company, the 539-foot high 14 Wall Street Building was the tallest bank building in the world when it was completed. Designed by the prestigious firm of Trowbridge & Livingston, this granite-clad tower incorporated the latest in building technologies and was one of the first buildings to employ a cofferdam foundation system. Inspired by the campanile of San Marco in Venice, the building's design is notable for its austere decorative scheme incorporating specific Greek architectural motifs. Especially noteworthy is the seven-story stepped pyramid which is credited with setting an important precedent for the development of boldly topped skyscraper towers. In 1931-33 the building received a twenty-five-story, L-shaped addition, designed by the leading architectural firm of Shreve, Lamb & Harmon. The addition is articulated with a blend of Modern Classic and Art Deco motifs which complements Trowbridge & Livingston's original design. Over the years the 14 Wall Street Building has become a symbol of the financial district. Its design was widely copied during the 1920s and remains an inspiration for modern designers. The site of the 14 Wall Street Building at the northwest corner of Wall and Nassau Streets was one of the most desirable in the financial district due to its location at a broad intersection which was "almost equivalent to a public square in area." Its distinguished neighbors included the adjacent Hanover Bank Building on Nassau Street, the U.S. Sub-Treasury in the old Custom House across Nassau Street, and the nearby New York Stock Exchange and J.P. Morgan & Company in the Drexel Building on Broad Street. In order to obtain an adequate return on the cost of the property which had been purchased at a record price for New York real estate, the owners decided to erect a tall building.14 Given the almost square proportions of the site, which had a frontage of 97 feet on Wall Street and 94 feet on Nassau Street, and the proposed 539-feet height of the structure, Trowbridge & Livingston chose to treat the building as a tower, "indicating on the exterior the offices of the company by a colonnade, and enhancing the beauty of the upper part of building by a loggia and a stone pyramid, in place of the usual flat or mansard roof." The overall design of the granite-clad tower was based on the fifteenth-century campanile of San Marco in Venice, a model first used by Bruce Price in an unexecuted but widely published design for the Sun Building of 1890 and first realized by Napoleon LeBrun & Sons in the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower in 1907-09. As Sarah Bradford Landau observed in her history of the New York skyscraper, the 14 Wall Street "building departed from earlier such towers by virtue of its granite-clad roof and its specifically Greek architectural motifs." The architects indicated that they had adopted the Greek style because of its adaptability to the problems of modern practice and because "its simplicity and grace, as well as its supreme dignity and seriousness combine to make it peculiarly appropriate to the location and the purpose of the building."17 Sources for the design included the Ionic order on the Erechtheum at the Acropolis, ancient Macedonian prototypes,18 and reconstruction drawings of the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, the model for the stepped-pyramid temple which crowns the building, giving it its distinctive profile against the skyline. The windowless pyramid housed record rooms and storage spaces as well as the building's mechanical equipment including the main smoke stack which vented through openings in the apex of the pyramid producing "an effect not unlike a volcano in action." Trowbridge & Livingston's skillful handling of the aesthetic problems presented by the project was widely praised by the architectural critics of the day. The need to treat the lower part of the building to indicate not one but two banking offices was addressed by treating the first story and basement which were originally to house the Mercantile Trust Company as a high stylobate supporting the colonnaded floors that housed the Bankers Trust Company. Because the lower part of the building could only be seen from a comparatively short distance, the design of the base had to be scaled for close inspection yet still be appropriate for one of the tallest structures in the city. As Architecture magazine noted, This was done by the use of a Grecian order with fluted columns of exquisite refinement but great size; of belt courses delicately modeled, and with moldings under cut sufficien

singer furniture company
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