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1900-1950 Assessment

1900-1950 Assessment [For read aloud]


The World History course will address six (6) periods in the study of World History, with a key focus of study from the mid 15th century to present. The standards of this course are grouped in a way that reflects accepted periodization by historians. The learning standards of this course have been written to focus around a basic core of chronologically-organized periods and events in history in order to have a set of learning standards that can be reasonably taught and learned with some depth and not just memorization of facts, within the time available for classroom instruction.

Students taking this course will study major turning points that shaped the modern world. Students coming to this course are expected to have a firm foundation in the themes and tools of geography and early, ancient and classical civilizations from their K-8 experience. Written conceptually, standards for this course have been developed with an historical approach. The standards of this course are grouped in a way that reflects accepted periodization by historians.  Topics have been selected around a basic core of chronologically-organized history and social science knowledge. The conceptually written standards are a combination that will help to ensure students successfully achieve the mission of the North Carolina State Board of Education: “...every public school student will graduate from high school, globally competitive for work and postsecondary education and prepared for life in the 21st century.” Through the study of World History, students will acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to become responsible and effective citizens in an interdependent world.

The desired outcome of this course is that students develop relevant enduring understandings of current world issues and relate them to their historical, political, economic, geographical and cultural contexts. As students examine the historical roots of significant events, ideas, movements, and phenomena, they encounter the contributions and patterns of civilizations of the past and societies around the world. Students taking this course will broaden their historical perspectives as they explore ways societies have dealt with continuity and change, exemplified by concepts such as civilization, revolution, government, economics, war, stability, movement, technology, etc. This course is intended to be taught as a high school course that will receive high school credit. Thus, it has been developed based on the concepts, content and skills that are developmentally appropriate for students at the high school level.