International Space Station ISS (MKC)

This page contains recordings from the ISS and from the shuttle missions servicing it. A new addition is the arrival of the ARISS experiment on the ISS.

As soon as the ISS -Alpha- was occupied, in November 2000 CNN reported:


"...the situation in space is far from chaotic, but when the crew cannot find something they have no alternative but to call on Russian ground controllers, who are calling the shots during this early phase of the mission.


Russian ground stations are only available when the space station is passing over one of them, which means the crew can communicate with the ground only about 10-15 minutes at most out of each 90-minute orbit.


When the U.S. takes over day-to-day control of the station next year, crews will be in communication with the ground for all but a few minutes of each orbit, due to a NASA satellite system ..."



Ground stations can only communicate with an orbiting space station at specific times. A Russian publication that I bought in the Military Bookshop in Moscow in 1984 shows how an orbiting space station would be able to communicate with ground stations in the (former) Soviet Union and the fleet at sea.


The daily worksheet issued to cosmonauts at that time showed the times that the space station would be in communication with each ground station, as this extract shows:




So these are recordings of the ISS talking to the Russioan ground control.


These are in the ISS.... Wav files attached below.

In May 2000 I tried to record a far weaker signal - the STS-to-backpack link for a space walk (EVA). This is my best recording!


STS-101 brief indistinct recording: "I'm extremely anxious to conclude what we have done today"  on 279.0 NFM 23 may - attached below

Amateur radio on the ISS

The first ARISS experiment has been the use of the digital mode to relay messages via the ISS. Mostly it is being used to relay position messages. The program UI-VIEW automatically decodes this format and displays them on maps, like the one below.




This was an experiment carried out in Cornwall over Easter 2001. Using 10 Watts output, a TMD-700E data transceiver and a handheld Arrow antenna pointed optimistically at the predicted postion of the ISS, my position packet was relayed all over Europe by the ISS.


Subpages (1): Photos from ISS
Ć
ISS071100.wav
(173k)
Andy Thomas,
28 Jun 2009, 10:47
Ć
ISS071100halloo.wav
(53k)
Andy Thomas,
28 Jun 2009, 10:47
Ć
ISS081100.wav
(117k)
Andy Thomas,
28 Jun 2009, 10:47
Ć
ISS111100a.wav
(28k)
Andy Thomas,
28 Jun 2009, 10:47
Ć
ISS1111a.wav
(41k)
Andy Thomas,
28 Jun 2009, 10:46
Ć
sts101a.wav
(24k)
Andy Thomas,
28 Jun 2009, 10:48
Comments