UNFINISHED FRENCH COUNTRY FURNITURE : UNFINISHED FRENCH

Unfinished french country furniture : Rattan furniture replacement cushions : Dinning room furniture.

Unfinished French Country Furniture


unfinished french country furniture
    country furniture
  • General term for furniture made by provincial craftsmen using local and indigenous woods such as oak, elm, ash and fruitwoods. Durability and function were of greater importance than aesthetic design and comfort. Country furniture is typically individual in design.
    unfinished
  • (of an object) Not having been given an attractive surface appearance as the final stage of manufacture
  • not brought to an end or conclusion; "unfinished business"; "the building is still unfinished"
  • Not finished or concluded; incomplete
  • not brought to the desired final state
  • bare: lacking a surface finish such as paint; "bare wood"; "unfinished furniture"
    french
  • cut (e.g, beans) lengthwise in preparation for cooking; "French the potatoes"
  • the Romance language spoken in France and in countries colonized by France
  • Of or relating to France or its people or language
  • of or pertaining to France or the people of France; "French cooking"; "a Gallic shrug"
unfinished french country furniture - Entertainment O
Entertainment O Artist Jordan Knight Unfinished Rock Pop Product Type Compact Disc Domestic
Entertainment O Artist Jordan Knight Unfinished Rock Pop Product Type Compact Disc Domestic
Track Title. 1 Let's Go Higher. 2 Unfinished. 3 Like A Wave. 4 One More Night. 5 Stingy. 6 Kiss It Away. 7 Inside. 8 O-Face. 9 Rockstar. 10 Up N Down. 11 I Believe. 12 Never Alone. Unfinished -- Jordan Knight s first recording since 2005 s EP The Fix and his first full-length of new material since 1999 -- doesn t entirely ride the reputation Knight established as perhaps the biggest heartthrob of New Kids on the Block. Certainly, if Unfinished has any cousin within the NKOTB discography, it is not anything released during their 80s and 90s heyday, it s their 2008 comeback The Block, a record designed to thrust the group into a mainstream that had long ago left them behind. Unfinished bears the hallmarks of 2011 the way The Block sounded like 2008, but Knight wisely substitutes the lecherous sex talk of the NKOTB for something that s approaching genuine seduction. That Knight s smooth moves are frozen by cascading synths borrowed from the Ryan Tedder handbook winds up being a negligible problem: sure, the production is at an icy remove, but the songs are cleanly professional and Knight has a certain hunger to his performance, giving these steely, cluttered soundscapes a semblance of warmth which makes it a far cry better than the cold calculation of The Block. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi.

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Gutzon de la Mothe Borglum abandoned winter studio in san antonio tx (The creator of Mount Rushmore.)
Gutzon de la Mothe Borglum abandoned winter studio in san antonio tx (The creator of Mount Rushmore.)
borrowed this text from Gene Elder : IF ITS NOT THE ALAMO, then its just a studio by Gene Elde_______________r It has been my philosophy for some time now, that if you want to really enjoy an art exhibit, ignore the artist and the curator and go straight to the janitor. I have found that talking with the soul who picks up the trash after openings and daily sweeps the floors, empties ashtrays, polishes furniture and cleans the restrooms has the more interesting view of the arts. So with this in mind, I sat one Sunday on the steps of the Brackenridge Park Pumphouse and asked for wisdom from the Caretaker of the studio of Gutzon de la Mothe Borglum (The creator of Mount Rushmore.) INNER VIEW: There has not been a caretaker here in 10 years… people have forgotten this artistic heritage … but then perhaps that is the responsibility of a good studio, to remember the things that were created here and not to tell everything it knows. But this studio told me that many times Gutzon sat here in ecstasy; thinking about the monument that would lift the hearts of America long after he had gone … (an artist learns that nothing is ever really his, only his to leave behind.) Some of the time Gutzon sat here depressed and disenchanted from all the delays … but he understood that too. An artist is a servant as well as a leader and sometimes he must be both alone. Many thought he was a little crazy … then again… most did not see the world the way Gutzon did. This fateful studio, a two-story stone building near the Brackenridge golf course, was originally constructed under the supervision of George Washington Brackenridge in the mid-1880s. It served as the second pumphouse for the San Antonio Waterworks Co. until 1915 when it was abandoned. The pumphouse stood at the end of a long power canal which carried water to power turbines connected to a pump with a capacity of three million gallons daily. The water was lifted to the eastern end of Mahncke Park and in 1897 steam power was added to the station. Gutzon moved to the abandoned pumphouse in 1924, using it as a studio for 13 years. Now that the hor d’oeuvres have been served, to whet our appetite, shall we share a salad with our famous homemade house dressing? While reading a book titled Unfinished Dream, by June Zeither and Lincoln Borglum, I enjoyed learning these things and have chronologically and alphabetically tossed them into the salad section. Research revealed this famous South Dakota mountain site is named after a young New York attorney named Rushmore who was doing legal work for a mining company. When he asked the name of the peak, his companions answered lightly, “Hanged if we know! Lets call the damned thing Rushmore.” Gutzon’s first model, completed in his winter studio in Brackenridge Park, was of three figures. Washington: Since he represented the birth of the nation and the noble spirit which started a courageous people on an untried course. Jefferson: To show the inspiration of the Declaration of Independence along with the foresight of the Louisiana purchase which expanded our country. Lincoln: Representing the humanity, the suffering, the compassion, and the eternal unity of the nation. When Roosevelt was chosen it brought forth a flood of controversy. Calvin Coolidge agreed with Gutzon that Roosevelt would properly round out this saga in stone. His enthusiasm for the American West, his efforts in behalf of labor along with the building of the Panama Canal, proclaimed Roosevelt to be the logical choice. To Gutzon this choice was right. ”Regardless of what biased people may think of these four human beings, they were the ones who personified certain basic elements, crucial to our survival and growth as a nation.” Not only was the choice of Roosevelt an issue, Gutzon’s angels commissioned by the Belmont Chapel of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City erupted into a nationwide controversy. The ecclesiastical hierarchy rejected the models on the grounds they appeared too feminine. “Angels,” they declared, “are masculine.” Gutzon’s statue of Atlas bearing the weight of the world shocked the conservative. Delighting in this controversy, because “Atlas” turned out to be a woman, the sculptor explained that only woman has the strength and endurance for such a weight. There was also a conflict with the Daughters of the Confederacy over Stone Mountain which ended with Gutzon destroying his clay models. They raised a furious cry and demanded the immediate arrest of the fleeing sculptor. Gutzon escaped into North Carolina with the law of Georgia hot on his heels. North Carolina’s Governor McLean announced he would call out the militia to protect the sculptor. Besides being a sculptor, Gutzon served as a chairman of Central Park in New York and gave his thoughts to help San Antonio keep its historic Missions and meandering river. He also worked out an ambitious plan to beautify the entire state of Texas. He gave a strong speech before the fi
Gutzon de la Mothe Borglum abandoned winter studio in san antonio tx (The creator of Mount Rushmore.)
Gutzon de la Mothe Borglum abandoned winter studio in san antonio tx (The creator of Mount Rushmore.)
borroowed this text from Gene Elder : IF ITS NOT THE ALAMO, then its just a studio by Gene Elde_______________r It has been my philosophy for some time now, that if you want to really enjoy an art exhibit, ignore the artist and the curator and go straight to the janitor. I have found that talking with the soul who picks up the trash after openings and daily sweeps the floors, empties ashtrays, polishes furniture and cleans the restrooms has the more interesting view of the arts. So with this in mind, I sat one Sunday on the steps of the Brackenridge Park Pumphouse and asked for wisdom from the Caretaker of the studio of Gutzon de la Mothe Borglum (The creator of Mount Rushmore.) INNER VIEW: There has not been a caretaker here in 10 years… people have forgotten this artistic heritage … but then perhaps that is the responsibility of a good studio, to remember the things that were created here and not to tell everything it knows. But this studio told me that many times Gutzon sat here in ecstasy; thinking about the monument that would lift the hearts of America long after he had gone … (an artist learns that nothing is ever really his, only his to leave behind.) Some of the time Gutzon sat here depressed and disenchanted from all the delays … but he understood that too. An artist is a servant as well as a leader and sometimes he must be both alone. Many thought he was a little crazy … then again… most did not see the world the way Gutzon did. This fateful studio, a two-story stone building near the Brackenridge golf course, was originally constructed under the supervision of George Washington Brackenridge in the mid-1880s. It served as the second pumphouse for the San Antonio Waterworks Co. until 1915 when it was abandoned. The pumphouse stood at the end of a long power canal which carried water to power turbines connected to a pump with a capacity of three million gallons daily. The water was lifted to the eastern end of Mahncke Park and in 1897 steam power was added to the station. Gutzon moved to the abandoned pumphouse in 1924, using it as a studio for 13 years. Now that the hor d’oeuvres have been served, to whet our appetite, shall we share a salad with our famous homemade house dressing? While reading a book titled Unfinished Dream, by June Zeither and Lincoln Borglum, I enjoyed learning these things and have chronologically and alphabetically tossed them into the salad section. Research revealed this famous South Dakota mountain site is named after a young New York attorney named Rushmore who was doing legal work for a mining company. When he asked the name of the peak, his companions answered lightly, “Hanged if we know! Lets call the damned thing Rushmore.” Gutzon’s first model, completed in his winter studio in Brackenridge Park, was of three figures. Washington: Since he represented the birth of the nation and the noble spirit which started a courageous people on an untried course. Jefferson: To show the inspiration of the Declaration of Independence along with the foresight of the Louisiana purchase which expanded our country. Lincoln: Representing the humanity, the suffering, the compassion, and the eternal unity of the nation. When Roosevelt was chosen it brought forth a flood of controversy. Calvin Coolidge agreed with Gutzon that Roosevelt would properly round out this saga in stone. His enthusiasm for the American West, his efforts in behalf of labor along with the building of the Panama Canal, proclaimed Roosevelt to be the logical choice. To Gutzon this choice was right. ”Regardless of what biased people may think of these four human beings, they were the ones who personified certain basic elements, crucial to our survival and growth as a nation.” Not only was the choice of Roosevelt an issue, Gutzon’s angels commissioned by the Belmont Chapel of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City erupted into a nationwide controversy. The ecclesiastical hierarchy rejected the models on the grounds they appeared too feminine. “Angels,” they declared, “are masculine.” Gutzon’s statue of Atlas bearing the weight of the world shocked the conservative. Delighting in this controversy, because “Atlas” turned out to be a woman, the sculptor explained that only woman has the strength and endurance for such a weight. There was also a conflict with the Daughters of the Confederacy over Stone Mountain which ended with Gutzon destroying his clay models. They raised a furious cry and demanded the immediate arrest of the fleeing sculptor. Gutzon escaped into North Carolina with the law of Georgia hot on his heels. North Carolina’s Governor McLean announced he would call out the militia to protect the sculptor. Besides being a sculptor, Gutzon served as a chairman of Central Park in New York and gave his thoughts to help San Antonio keep its historic Missions and meandering river. He also worked out an ambitious plan to beautify the entire state of Texas. He gave a strong speech before the f

unfinished french country furniture
unfinished french country furniture
Unfinished Business
What was she doing here? Hyattown had changed very little in the years Vanessa Sexton had been away. In some ways her high school sweetheart, Brady Tucker, hadn't changed much either—he was still lean, athletic, rugged…But the once reckless boy had become a solid, dependable man. He'd stood her up on the most important night of her life; could she ever trust him again?
So Vanessa had finally come home, Brady thought. She could still turn him inside out with one of her sultry looks. He couldn't believe she hadn't forgiven him for that night twelve years ago—but he'd had his reasons for not showing up. He'd let her leave town then—but he wasn't going to let her get away this time…

What was she doing here? Hyattown had changed very little in the years Vanessa Sexton had been away. In some ways her high school sweetheart, Brady Tucker, hadn't changed much either—he was still lean, athletic, rugged…But the once reckless boy had become a solid, dependable man. He'd stood her up on the most important night of her life; could she ever trust him again?
So Vanessa had finally come home, Brady thought. She could still turn him inside out with one of her sultry looks. He couldn't believe she hadn't forgiven him for that night twelve years ago—but he'd had his reasons for not showing up. He'd let her leave town then—but he wasn't going to let her get away this time…

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