GRAND DOLLHOUSE FURNITURE. DOLLHOUSE FURNITURE

GRAND DOLLHOUSE FURNITURE. RECYCLING FURNITURE FOR FAMILIES.

Grand Dollhouse Furniture


grand dollhouse furniture
    dollhouse
  • A miniature toy house used for playing with dolls
  • a small model of a house used as a toy by children
  • a house so small that it is likened to a child's plaything
  • A dollhouse is a toy home, made in miniature. For the last century, dollhouses have primarily been the domain of children but their collection and crafting is also a hobby for many adults.
    furniture
  • Furniture + 2 is the most recent EP released by American post-hardcore band Fugazi. It was recorded in January and February 2001, the same time that the band was recording their last album, The Argument, and released in October 2001 on 7" and on CD.
  • A person's habitual attitude, outlook, and way of thinking
  • furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; "they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; "there was only one piece of furniture in the room"
  • Furniture is the mass noun for the movable objects ('mobile' in Latin languages) intended to support various human activities such as seating and sleeping in beds, to hold objects at a convenient height for work using horizontal surfaces above the ground, or to store things.
  • Large movable equipment, such as tables and chairs, used to make a house, office, or other space suitable for living or working
  • Small accessories or fittings for a particular use or piece of equipment
    grand
  • Magnificent and imposing in appearance, size, or style
  • (of a person) Of high rank and with an appearance and manner appropriate to it
  • thousand: the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100
  • Designed to impress through scale or splendor
  • expansive: of behavior that is impressive and ambitious in scale or scope; "an expansive lifestyle"; "in the grand manner"; "collecting on a grand scale"; "heroic undertakings"
  • august: of or befitting a lord; "heir to a lordly fortune"; "of august lineage"
grand dollhouse furniture - Grand Pursuit:
Grand Pursuit: The Story of Economic Genius
Grand Pursuit: The Story of Economic Genius
In a sweeping narrative, the author of the megabestseller A Beautiful Mind takes us on a journey through modern history with the men and women who changed the lives of every single person on the planet. It’s the epic story of the making of modern economics, and of how economics rescued mankind from squalor and deprivation by placing its material fate in its own hands rather than in Fate.
Nasar’s account begins with Charles Dickens and Henry Mayhew observing and publishing the condition of the poor majority in mid-nineteenth-century London, the richest and most glittering place in the world. This was a new pursuit. She describes the often heroic efforts of Marx, Engels, Alfred Marshall, Beatrice and Sydney Webb, and the American Irving Fisher to put those insights into action—with revolutionary consequences for the world.
From the great John Maynard Keynes to Schumpeter, Hayek, Keynes’s disciple Joan Robinson, the influential American economists Paul Samuelson and Milton Freedman, and India’s Nobel Prize winner Amartya Sen, she shows how the insights of these activist thinkers transformed the world—from one city, London, to the developed nations in Europe and America, and now to the entire planet. In Nasar’s dramatic narrative of these discoverers we witness men and women responding to personal crises, world wars, revolutions, economic upheavals, and each other’s ideas to turn back Malthus and transform the dismal science into a triumph over mankind’s hitherto age-old destiny of misery and early death. This idea, unimaginable less than 200 years ago, is a story of trial and error, but ultimately transcendent, as it is rendered here in a stunning and moving narrative.

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Victorian Witch Enchanted Hutch ~1:12 Scale
Victorian Witch Enchanted Hutch ~1:12 Scale
“A Little Tale”… Elisbeth had been a witch since birth. She was born into a family that consisted of a long line of powerful, highly regarded, and knowledgeable witches. So, it was only natural for her to be raised as what she was, a witch. And, fortunately for her, she was born at a time when witches, the occult, and the like was very popular...the Victorian Era, Her childhood, during this era was magical; not only in what she was taught and could do, but by wonder, enchantment, and the contact she had with nature, the elements, elementals, and animals. Her days were spent, in great part, simply wandering in the woods and forests, playing with elementals, and studying the Heavens and the moon phases. Her favorite moon phase was the full moon. For with the full moon came the rituals, but, best of all, the moon was huge and Elisbeth felt she could talk directly to the Goddess. She would bend her little head back as far as it would go, look up at the big round orb with eyes wide and mouth slightly opened in awe, and mentally send her messages to the Goddess. And, she knew for certain that the Goddess heard her and answered her. She heard the Goddess’ voice clearly in her head. …During her full moon discussions with the Goddess, the Goddess empowered little Elisbeth with even greater knowledge, wisdom, and imparted long held secrets. The Goddess adored the child…. So, the Goddess enhanced Elisbeth’s abilities, powers, psychic vision, and gifts even more and…[she] grew and became one of the wisest, most knowledgeable, and powerful witches among all witches who ever lived. Her communications with the Goddess, as well as the time period in which she was born made Elisbeth love the Victorian Era and never wanted to see it end. Sadly, though, one night, in her scrying bowl, she saw the future and did not like what she saw. All the hussle and bustle, the wars, the hate, the loss of manners and etiquette, lack of people caring for one another, and most of all, the disregard, which would be even greater than that in the Victorian Era, for animals and nature... So, she put a spell on herself. She made it so that, to her, it would always be the Victorian Era. She saw no planes, iPods, TVs, cell phones and the like. She continued to wander in the woods and forests with no fear of being harmed and practiced her craft, helping others, nature, and animals. She dressed and conducted herself like a grand Victorian lady, following the traditions and customs she was taught during that time. People saw her as eccentric or a bit batty, but she did not care. She was happy and content. She spent every full moon outside with her head bent way back, eyes wide, and her mouth slightly opened. She would talk to the Goddess and the Goddess would answer her. She was happy. “Life”, she thought, “is what you make it. The power is in each of us to create the life we want and to choose to be happy or sad.” ~Marsha J. West~ Author and Owner of this original “A Little Tale” * Edited for Flickr. “The Little Tale” is my original idea, story idea, and the story itself is written by me, Marsha J. West. It is my property and cannot be copied, reproduced, reprinted or used. Sold.
Victorian Witch Enchanted Hutch ~1:12 Scale
Victorian Witch Enchanted Hutch ~1:12 Scale
“A Little Tale”… Elisbeth had been a witch since birth. She was born into a family that consisted of a long line of powerful, highly regarded, and knowledgeable witches. So, it was only natural for her to be raised as what she was, a witch. And, fortunately for her, she was born at a time when witches, the occult, and the like was very popular...the Victorian Era, Her childhood, during this era was magical; not only in what she was taught and could do, but by wonder, enchantment, and the contact she had with nature, the elements, elementals, and animals. Her days were spent, in great part, simply wandering in the woods and forests, playing with elementals, and studying the Heavens and the moon phases. Her favorite moon phase was the full moon. For with the full moon came the rituals, but, best of all, the moon was huge and Elisbeth felt she could talk directly to the Goddess. She would bend her little head back as far as it would go, look up at the big round orb with eyes wide and mouth slightly opened in awe, and mentally send her messages to the Goddess. And, she knew for certain that the Goddess heard her and answered her. She heard the Goddess’ voice clearly in her head. …During her full moon discussions with the Goddess, the Goddess empowered little Elisbeth with even greater knowledge, wisdom, and imparted long held secrets. The Goddess adored the child…. So, the Goddess enhanced Elisbeth’s abilities, powers, psychic vision, and gifts even more and…[she] grew and became one of the wisest, most knowledgeable, and powerful witches among all witches who ever lived. Her communications with the Goddess, as well as the time period in which she was born made Elisbeth love the Victorian Era and never wanted to see it end. Sadly, though, one night, in her scrying bowl, she saw the future and did not like what she saw. All the hussle and bustle, the wars, the hate, the loss of manners and etiquette, lack of people caring for one another, and most of all, the disregard, which would be even greater than that in the Victorian Era, for animals and nature... So, she put a spell on herself. She made it so that, to her, it would always be the Victorian Era. She saw no planes, iPods, TVs, cell phones and the like. She continued to wander in the woods and forests with no fear of being harmed and practiced her craft, helping others, nature, and animals. She dressed and conducted herself like a grand Victorian lady, following the traditions and customs she was taught during that time. People saw her as eccentric or a bit batty, but she did not care. She was happy and content. She spent every full moon outside with her head bent way back, eyes wide, and her mouth slightly opened. She would talk to the Goddess and the Goddess would answer her. She was happy. “Life”, she thought, “is what you make it. The power is in each of us to create the life we want and to choose to be happy or sad.” ~Marsha J. West~ Author and Owner of this original “A Little Tale” * Edited for Flickr. “The Little Tale” is my original idea, story idea, and the story itself is written by me, Marsha J. West. It is my property and cannot be copied, reproduced, reprinted or used. SOLD.

grand dollhouse furniture
grand dollhouse furniture
The Grand - Complete Collection
Lust, greed, and gossip in a glamorous British hotel of the 1920s
As the most opulent hotel in Manchester, England, during the decadent Roaring ’20s, The Grand is more than a building. It’s a nexus for schemes, scandals, romance, and intrigue. For owner John Bannerman, The Grand symbolizes a tradition of luxury and elegance begun by his father. For Marcus Bannerman, it becomes a risky investment and a way to entice his brother’s wife into bed. And for the maids and porters employed there, it represents a possible escape from their hardscrabble past--and an endless source of backstairs gossip.
Written by Russell T Davies (Casanova, Touching Evil) and featuring three-time Emmy®-winner Susan Hampshire, this is addictive period drama in the tradition of Upstairs, Downstairs and The Duchess of Duke Street. Divided by class and circumstance or tied together by love and loyalty, the myriad characters who populate The Grand prove unforgettable.

Image Upstairs Downstairs on a more massive scale. Or, if you can, a serious version of Fawlty Towers set in the 1920s in Manchester's luxurious Grand Hotel. Closed for renovations following World War I, the hotel and its staff face financial ruin, foreclosure, suicide, and infidelity before even reopening its doors to guests in the first episode of the series. When it finally welcomes visitors, guests abound, but so does trouble. This highly acclaimed eight-part story has everything a miniseries requires: suspense, social climbers, financial double-dealing, humor, murder, and semiretired prostitutes.
Written by Queer as Folk author Russell T. Davies, The Grand features an ever-surprising plot propelled by strong characters, their loyalties, rivalries, and revelations. The large and adept cast portrays the hotel guests, staff, and owners. This diverse ensemble re-creates an era when class distinctions between the upper and working classes were all-important. The Grand's doorman acts as a cultural interpreter between the posh owners and the working-class staff. The sets and costumes are done with a remarkable attention to detail that will please both Anglophiles and PBS fans. --Tara Chace

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