SEND FLOWERS EDINBURGH - SEND FLOWERS

SEND FLOWERS EDINBURGH - PINK PERENNIAL FLOWERS - FLOWERS IN SEASON IN JANUARY.

Send Flowers Edinburgh


send flowers edinburgh
    send flowers
  • Send Flowers is the debut album release from Black Lungs, the side project of Alexisonfire guitarist and backing vocalist Wade MacNeil. MacNeil's sound has been described as "the soundtrack for punk rockers, hip hoppers, pill poppers, young ladies and show stoppers."
    edinburgh
  • The capital of Scotland, on the southern shore of the Firth of Forth; pop. 421,200. The city grew up around an 11th-century castle built by Malcolm III on a rocky ridge that dominates the landscape
  • Edinburgh (, or ; Scots: Edinburgh ; Scottish Gaelic: Dun Eideann) is the capital city of Scotland, the second largest city in Scotland after Glasgow and the seventh-most populous in the United Kingdom. The City of Edinburgh Council is one of Scotland's 32 local government council areas.
  • Edinburgh Prison is located in the West Side of Edinburgh on the main A71, in an area known as Stenhouse, and although never been named such is frequently known colloquially as Saughton.
  • the capital of Scotland; located in the Lothian Region on the south side of the Firth of Forth

Dresden, Frauenkirche, 05
Dresden, Frauenkirche, 05
The Dresden Frauenkirche (German: Dresdner Frauenkirche, literally Church of Our Lady) is a Lutheran church in Dresden, eastern Germany. Built in the 18th century, the church was destroyed in the firebombing of Dresden during World War II. It has been reconstructed as a landmark symbol of reconciliation between former warring enemies. The reconstruction of its exterior was completed in 2004, its interior in 2005 and, after 13 years of rebuilding, the church was reconsecrated on 30 October 2005 with festive services lasting through the Protestant observance of Reformation Day on 31 October. Once a month, an Anglican Evensong in English is held in the Church of Our Lady, with clergy sent from St. George's Anglican Chaplaincy in Berlin. A first Kirche zu unser liuben Vrouwen was built in the 11th century in romanesque architecture. It was outside the city walls and surrounded by a grave yard. The Frauenkirche was seat of an archpriest in the Diocese Mei?en until Reformation, when it became a Protestant church. This first Frauenkirche was torn down in 1727 and replaced by a new church due to capacity requests. The modern Frauenkirche was built as a Lutheran (Protestant) parish church by the citizenry. Even though Saxony's Prince-elector, Frederick August I, reconverted to Roman Catholicism to become King of Poland, he supported the construction to have an impressive cupola in the Dresden townscape. The original Baroque church was built between 1726 and 1743, and was designed by Dresden's city architect, George Bahr, who did not live to see the completion of his greatest work. Bahr's distinctive design for the church captured the new spirit of the Protestant liturgy by placing the altar, pulpit, and baptismal font directly centered in view of the entire congregation. In 1736, famed organ maker Gottfried Silbermann built a three-manual, 43-stop instrument for the church. The organ was dedicated on 25 November and Johann Sebastian Bach gave a recital on the instrument on 1 December. Church of Our Lady, 1880. The church's most distinctive feature was its unconventional 96 m-high dome, called die Steinerne Glocke or "Stone Bell". An engineering feat comparable to Michelangelo's dome for St. Peter's Basilica in Rome, the Frauenkirche's 12,000-ton sandstone dome stood high resting on eight slender supports. Despite initial doubts, the dome proved to be extremely stable. Witnesses in 1760 said that the dome had been hit by more than 100 cannonballs fired by the Prussian army led by Friedrich II during the Seven Years' War. The projectiles bounced off and the church survived. The completed church gave the city of Dresden a distinctive silhouette, captured in famous paintings by Bernardo Bellotto, a nephew of the artist Canaletto (also known by the same name), and in Dresden by Moonlight by Norwegian painter Johan Christian Dahl. In 1849, the church was at the heart of the revolutionary disturbances known as the May Uprising. It was surrounded by barricades, and fighting lasted for days before those rebels who had not already fled were rounded up in the church and arrested. For more than 200 years, the bell-shaped dome stood over the skyline of old Dresden, dominating the city. Burials include Heinrich Schutz and George Bahr. Destruction Ruins of the Frauenkirche in 1958. Catalogued fragments of the Frauenkirche ruins, September 1999. On 13 February 1945, Anglo-American allied forces began the bombing of Dresden. The church withstood two days and nights of the attacks and the eight interior sandstone pillars supporting the large dome held up long enough for the evacuation of 300 people who had sought shelter in the church crypt, before succumbing to the heat generated by some 650,000 incendiary bombs that were dropped on the city. The temperature surrounding and inside the church eventually reached 1,000 degrees Celsius.[1] The dome finally collapsed at 10 a.m. on 15 February. The pillars glowed bright red and exploded; the outer walls shattered and nearly 6,000 tons of stone plunged to earth, penetrating the massive floor as it fell. The altar, a relief depiction of Jesus’ agony in the Garden of Gethsemane on the Mount of Olives by Johann Christian Feige, was only partially damaged during the bombing raid and fire that destroyed the church. The altar and the structure behind it, the chancel, were among the remnants left standing. Features of most of the figures were lopped off by falling debris and the fragments lay under the rubble. The building vanished from Dresden's skyline, and the blackened stones would lie in wait in a pile in the center of the city for the next 45 years as Communist rule enveloped what was now East Germany. Shortly after the end of World War II, residents of Dresden had already begun salvaging unique stone fragments from the Church of Our Lady and numbering them for future use in reconstruction. Popular sentiment discouraged the authorities from
location of Torreya taxifolia
location of Torreya taxifolia
Chapman, A. W. 1885. Torreya taxifolia, Arnott. A Reminiscence. Botanical Gazette 10(4): 250-254 Chapman provides this map along with his story about the discovery and naming of "Florida yew"... "Mr. [Hardy B.] Croom was then on one of his annual journeys from New Berne, North Carolina, the residence of the family, to his plantation in the adjoining county of Leon; but previously to settling permanently in that country, he had rented a plantation on the west bank of the Apalachicola river opposite the calcareous cliffs at Aspalaga on the east bank, which at that time were covered by a dense grove of Torreya, and it was here, probably in 1833, that he first saw it. Recognizing it as likely to be new, at least to our Flora, he sent a flowerless branch to Mr. Nuttall, who briefly noticed it in the JHournal of the Philadelphia Academy, Vol. VII, p. 96, with the suggestion that it might be the Taxus montana, of Mexico. At the time of our first meeting in 1835 it appears that he had made the acquaintance of Dr. Torrey in New York, and had supplied him with specimens in flower and fruit; and it was during the previous summer, and at the latter's request for additional information and material, that my connection with the tree commenced. His first impressions were, I believe, that it might be a species of Podocarpus, but these, after a minute analysis of all its parts, he soon abandoned, and came to the conclusion that it constituted the type of a new genus among the Taxoid conifers, a conclusion also entertained by his friend and correspondent, Dr. Arnott, of Edinburgh, to whom he had communicated specimens togehther with a report of his anal;yses, and the latter, after disposing of the Torreya of Sprengel, which was proved to be a species of Clerodendron, and ignoring sundry less Torreyas, transferred the name to the Florida tree, and published a full description and figure of it in Annals of Natural History, Vol. I, p. 126, under the name Torreya taxifolia."

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