Peer Reviewed Articles

The following sources are journal articles that were published in peer-reviewed journals. Each article offers different information on the impact of drugs in the African-American community. 

Doherty, E., Green, K., & Reisinger, H. (2008, March). Long-Term Patterns of Drug Use Among an Urban African-American Cohort: The Role of Gender and Family. Journal of Urban Health, 250-267.

This article was published in the Journal of Urban Health, a journal that addresses health issues from a clinical and policy perspective.

This article is similar to the previous one by some of the same authors, in that it studies the results of group of African American cohorts over a 40-year period. This article differentiates itself by seeking to find if family structure and gender issues have an impact on a black person’s drug use later in life.

This article would be good for those seeking to get a good understanding on the roles family structure, gender, and social identity play for in the lives of drug addicts.

This source was found using Academic Search Premier, searching for the terms ((DE "DRUG abuse")  or  (DE "DRUG abuse & crime"))  and  (DE "AFRICAN Americans").


Green, K. M., Doherty, E. E., Resinger, H. S., Chilcoat, H. D., & Ensminger, M. (2010, March). Social integration in young adulthood and the subsequent onset of substance use and disorders among a community population of urban African Americans. Addiction, 484-493.

This article was published in the peer-reviewed journal, Addiction, which is a British journal that highlights various papers, news, and notes about the various forms of addiction.

This article seeks to examine the relationship between social integration in young adulthood and substance abuse in later life among a sample group of African Americans. The findings in the article suggest that social integration in young adult plays an important role in whether or not substance abuse will appear during mid-late adulthood.

This article would of interests to researchers because it follows a group of African Americans from the same neighborhood in Chicago, from 6 to 42 years old and they were assessed at four periods during the research.

This source was found through the Academic Search Premier database, using the search terms DE "AFRICAN Americans" and DE "substance abuse".


Larkin, R. (2003). African-Americans in Public Housing: A Traditional Social Work Approach to Substance Abuse Treatment. Journal of Health & Social Policy, 67-82.

The journal that published this article, Journal of Health & Social Policy, focuses on proving articles on health, social policy, and policy formation and implementation.

This article seeks to identify families where substance abuse was present and also to examine the effectiveness of home-based and family centered substance abuse treatment. The study took place in public housing complexes, set up to allow African American families recognize their strengths. The results of the evaluation found that home-based treatment can be successful in the African American public housing communities.

This article would be of interest to any researcher looking to find information on African American substance abusers living in public housing and what methods are being taken to offer treatment to these populations.

This article was found using Academic Search Premier, searching for the terms ((DE "DRUG abuse")  or  (DE "DRUG abuse & crime"))  and  (DE "AFRICAN Americans").


Mandara, J., & Murray, C. B. (2006). Father's Absence and African American Adolescent Drug Use. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 46, 1-12.

This article was published in the Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, which publishes findings on all aspects of divorce, including clinical practice and relevant research.

The article presents the findings of a study that assessed the effects of a father’s absence on drug use among African American youth. The finding resulted in a better understanding of the difference in causes of drug use among African American boys and girls. 

This article would be useful to those researching drug use among African American youth, and also family issues that may cause drug use in adolescents.

This article was found using Academic Search Premier, searching for the terms ((DE "DRUG abuse")  or  (DE "DRUG abuse & crime"))  and  (DE "AFRICAN Americans").


Okundaye, J. N., Cornelius, L. J., & Manning, M. (2001). Drug Trafficking Among African American Youth: Risk Factors for Future Incarceration. Journal of African American Men, 39.

This article comes from the Journal of African American Men, a journal aimed towards social scientists for the analysis of the struggles and triumphs of black males.

This article studies the lives of young back American males and their involvement or nonparticipation in drug trafficking.  The results of the study find that young black males that choose not to traffic drugs more often than not have strong familial ties and learn about the dangers of drug trafficking.

This study is important because of its focus on showcasing the correlation between black males drug dealers and familial influence.

This article was found using Academic Search Premier, searching for the terms ((DE "DRUG abuse")  or  (DE "DRUG abuse & crime"))  and  (DE "AFRICAN Americans").


Schilling, R., Mares, A., & El-Bassel, N. (2004). Women in detoxification: loss of guardianship of their children. Children & Youth Services Review, 463-480.

This article appeared in the journal Children & Youth Services Review, which provides articles on the critical analysis and assessment of social services programs for young people.

This article reports the findings of a study that was done to investigate the living conditions of the children of women in detoxification programs. The study interviewed over 250 black and Latina women to find the relationship between drug use, education, and the guardianship status of their minor children.

A researcher looking for information on drug addicted mothers of color and the effects of their drug use on their minor children would find this article useful.

This article was found using Academic Search Premier, searching for the terms ((DE "DRUG abuse")  or  (DE "DRUG abuse & crime"))  and  (DE "AFRICAN Americans").


Sharma, M., & Atri, A. (2006, September). Substance Abuse in African Americans: In Search of a Culturally Competent Research Agenda. Journal of Alcohol & Drug Education, 3-7.

This article was published in a peer-reviewed journal, which reports experiences and experiments in regard to alcohol and drugs for teachers and educators. 

The purpose of this article is to reflect on the research that has been done on substance abuse in the African American community and to identify what role cultural influences play. The author calls for new research to be done in the black community that includes information from all groups that makeup blacks in the US.

This article is important to include because it seeks to separate each of the diverse groups that make up black Americans and find any commonalities in the predictors of substance abuse for each group.

This source as found searching Google using the keywords: substance abuse, black, youth.


Slomka, J. (2008, November). Decisions to participate in research: views of underserved minority drug users with or at risk for HIV. AIDS Care, 1224-1232.

This article is from the peer-reviewed journal AIDS Care, which seeks provide research and reports from those involved in the HIV/AIDS field.

This article aims to present quality information about the under-represented African American drug users, in relation to HIV/AIDS research. The author study’s the African American drug user’s understanding of research participation and their decisions to participate based on hypothetical HIV/AIDS related studies.

This article would be of interest to researchers looking for information on African American drug users and any HIV/AIDS research that has been done on that group.

This article was found using Academic Search Premier, searching for the terms ((DE "DRUG abuse")  or  (DE "DRUG abuse & crime"))  and  (DE "AFRICAN Americans").

 

 

 

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