HOW TO CLEAN MAKEUP BRUSHES AT HOME. MAKEUP BRUSHES AT HOME

HOW TO CLEAN MAKEUP BRUSHES AT HOME. MAKE UP FOR MODELS. MAKE UP LOOKS FOR 2011.

How To Clean Makeup Brushes At Home


how to clean makeup brushes at home
    at home
  • a reception held in your own home
  • An informal party in a person's home
  • on the home team's field; "they played at home last night"
  • A period when a person has announced that they will receive visitors in their home
  • at, to, or toward the place where you reside; "he worked at home"
    brushes
  • (brush) an implement that has hairs or bristles firmly set into a handle
  • A thin stick set with long wire bristles, used to make a soft hissing sound on drums or cymbals
  • An implement with a handle, consisting of bristles, hair, or wire set into a block, used for cleaning or scrubbing, applying a liquid or powder to a surface, arranging the hair, or other purposes
  • (brush) rub with a brush, or as if with a brush; "Johnson brushed the hairs from his jacket"
  • An act of sweeping, applying, or arranging with such an implement or with one's hand
  • (brush) a dense growth of bushes
    how to
  • A how-to or a how to is an informal, often short, description of how to accomplish some specific task. A how-to is usually meant to help non-experts, may leave out details that are only important to experts, and may also be greatly simplified from an overall discussion of the topic.
  • Providing detailed and practical advice
  • Practical advice on a particular subject; that gives advice or instruction on a particular topic
  • (How To’s) Multi-Speed Animations
    makeup
  • The combination of qualities that form a person's temperament
  • cosmetics applied to the face to improve or change your appearance
  • an event that is substituted for a previously cancelled event; "he missed the test and had to take a makeup"; "the two teams played a makeup one week later"
  • constitution: the way in which someone or something is composed
  • Cosmetics such as lipstick or powder applied to the face, used to enhance or alter the appearance
  • The composition or constitution of something
    clean
  • make clean by removing dirt, filth, or unwanted substances from; "Clean the stove!"; "The dentist cleaned my teeth"
  • clean and jerk: a weightlift in which the barbell is lifted to shoulder height and then jerked overhead
  • Remove the innards of (fish or poultry) prior to cooking
  • free from dirt or impurities; or having clean habits; "children with clean shining faces"; "clean white shirts"; "clean dishes"; "a spotlessly clean house"; "cats are clean animals"
  • Make (something or someone) free of dirt, marks, or mess, esp. by washing, wiping, or brushing
how to clean makeup brushes at home - At Home:
At Home: A Style for Today with Things from the Past
At Home: A Style for Today with Things from the Past
Leading interior designer and owner of Hollyhock, Los Angeles’s renowned antiques and decorative arts mecca, Suzanne Rheinstein is known for her relaxed, elegant style. Style maker and interior designer Suzanne Rheinstein has a keen appreciation for special luxuries. She is a master at taking an eclectic mix of furnishings from the past and arranging them in a fresh, inspiring way. Elegant simplicity and attention to detail are the hallmarks of her look. A timeless quality pervades every room she designs. Rheinstein feels that how you live your life every day is much more important than getting your house together for a special occasion. Beautifully photographed, this inspiring volume shows examples of her work, ranging from a brick farmhouse in the Virginia countryside and a sophisticated rustic getaway overlooking the Big Wood River in Sun Valley to a year-round shingled residence on the beach in Newport Bay, as well as her own homes—a gracious Georgian Revival in Los Angeles and a New York City prewar pied-a-terre. They exemplify her talent for creating attractive homes that make living and entertaining extremely pleasurable.

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HBM!...lounging at home...
HBM!...lounging at home...
Goodmorning and the happiest of Mondays to you all! Cloudy and rainy weather has returned and the word summer seems like very far away since last night. Days like that - and there are many in Germany! - am just happy to be in a home environment I adore and from where most of my work can be completed. Don't let the picture and its title fool you, I'm and will be doing anything but lounging during the whole week! Still, have enjoyed lots of such hours during this weekend, diving into favorite books... We decided to stay at home and our outings to be without a car, instead on foot or by bicycle, exploring new corners of our neighbourhood. Less excitement than the previous weekend, but all is needed in life. Next weekend will find us in August...I'm amazed at how fast time flies... Wishes for us all to be making the best use of it. All the love Ivy xx
Day 183: Hello There
Day 183: Hello There
Only thirteen days until I leave for Ireland and there is so much I need to do. I need to start making lists. And I need to start packing. And I need to clean my house. And I need to get all my change turned into bills. And I need to make sure I have all of my bills that will come due while I'm gone paid. And I got to make sure I tie up all my loose ends at work. And I gotta settle down. So many things! So many things going on and so many things to look forward to. And it's all of a sudden like....time! Snuck up on me a bit. The end of this year is so very different than the end of last year. And for that I am glad. I need that. Glad I can see it. I guess I'm halfway through my second 365 project, too. How'd that happen? Huh...

how to clean makeup brushes at home
how to clean makeup brushes at home
Ad Hoc at Home
Thomas Keller shares family-style recipes that you can make any or every day. In the book every home cook has been waiting for, the revered Thomas Keller turns his imagination to the American comfort foods closest to his heart—flaky biscuits, chicken pot pies, New England clam bakes, and cherry pies so delicious and redolent of childhood that they give Proust's madeleines a run for their money. Keller, whose restaurants The French Laundry in Yountville, California, and Per Se in New York have revolutionized American haute cuisine, is equally adept at turning out simpler fare.

In Ad Hoc at Home—a cookbook inspired by the menu of his casual restaurant Ad Hoc in Yountville—he showcases more than 200 recipes for family-style meals. This is Keller at his most playful, serving up such truck-stop classics as Potato Hash with Bacon and Melted Onions and grilled-cheese sandwiches, and heartier fare including beef Stroganoff and roasted spring leg of lamb. In fun, full-color photographs, the great chef gives step-by-step lessons in kitchen basics— here is Keller teaching how to perfectly shape a basic hamburger, truss a chicken, or dress a salad. Best of all, where Keller’s previous best-selling cookbooks were for the ambitious advanced cook, Ad Hoc at Home is filled with quicker and easier recipes that will be embraced by both kitchen novices and more experienced cooks who want the ultimate recipes for American comfort-food classics.

Amazon Best Books of the Month, November 2009: You don't often see the name Thomas Keller mixed with words like "accessible" or "home cook," but with Ad Hoc at Home, the award-winning chef presents a collection of recipes destined for the center of the table at casual family gatherings. Don't throw away your whole notion of "quick and easy," though, as this is still a casual cookbook filtered through the genius mind of the man behind The French Laundry Cookbook, but the sense of whimsy and the pure joy of Keller doing his version of comfort food proves irresistible. The inspiration for his restaurant Ad Hoc was the simple family meals created and served by the staff at his restaurants. As he says in the introduction, "here is food meant to be served from big bowls and platters passed hand to hand at the table." And with dishes like Buttermilk Fried Chicken and Pineapple Upside-Down Cake, who's going to argue with that? --Brad Thomas Parsons




From Ad Hoc at Home: Buttermilk Fried Chicken

If there's a better fried chicken, I haven't tasted it. First, and critically, the chicken is brined for 12 hours in a herb-lemon brine, which seasons the meat and helps it stay juicy. The flour is seasoned with garlic and onion powders, paprika, cayenne, salt, and pepper. The chicken is dredged in the seasoned flour, dipped in buttermilk, and then dredged again in the flour. The crust becomes almost feathered and is very crisp. Fried chicken is a great American tradition that’s fallen out of favor. A taste of this, and you will want it back in your weekly routine. --Thomas Keller
Ingredients
(Serves 4-6)


Two 2 1/2- to 3-pound chickens (see Note on Chicken Size)
Chicken Brine (recipe follows), cold

For Dredging and Frying

Peanut or canola oil for deep-frying
1 quart buttermilk
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Coating

6 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup garlic powder
1/4 cup onion powder
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon cayenne
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Ground fleur de sel or fine sea salt
Rosemary and thyme sprigs for garnish


Directions
Cut each chicken into 10 pieces: 2 legs, 2 thighs, 4 breast quarters, and 2 wings. Pour the brine into a container large enough to hold the chicken pieces, add in the chicken, and refrigerate for 12 hours (no longer, or the chicken may become too salty).
Remove the chicken from the brine (discard the brine) and rinse under cold water, removing any herbs or spices sticking to the skin. Pat dry with paper towels, or let air-dry. Let rest at room temperature for 1-1/2 hours, or until it comes to room temperature.
If you have two large pots (about 6 inches deep) and a lot of oil, you can cook the dark and white meat at the same time; if not, cook the dark meat first, then turn up the heat and cook the white meat. No matter what size pot you have, the oil should not come more than one-third of the way up the sides of the pot. Fill the pot with at least 2 inches of peanut oil and heat to 320°F. Set a cooling rack over a baking sheet. Line a second baking sheet with parchment paper.
Meanwhile, combine all the coating ingredients in a large bowl. Transfer half the coating to a second large bowl. Pour the buttermilk into a third bowl and season with salt and pepper. Set up a dipping station: the chicken pieces, one bowl of coating, the bowl of buttermilk, the second bowl of coating, and the parchment-lined baking sheet.
Just before frying, dip the chicken thighs into the first bowl of coating, turning to coat and patting off the excess; dip them into the buttermilk, allowing the excess to run back into the bowl; then dip them into the second bowl of coating. Transfer to the parchment-lined pan.
Carefully lower the thighs into the hot oil. Adjust the heat as necessary to return the oil to the proper temperature. Fry for 2 minutes, then carefully move the chicken pieces around in the oil and continue to fry, monitoring the oil temperature and turning the pieces as necessary for even cooking, for 11 to 12 minutes, until the chicken is a deep golden brown, cooked through, and very crisp. Meanwhile, coat the chicken drumsticks and transfer to the parchment-lined baking sheet.
Transfer the cooked thighs to the cooling rack skin-side-up and let rest while you fry the remaining chicken. (Putting the pieces skin-side-up will allow excess fat to drain, whereas leaving them skin-side-down could trap some of the fat.) Make sure that the oil is at the correct temperature, and cook the chicken drumsticks. When the drumsticks are done, lean them meat-side-up against the thighs to drain, then sprinkle the chicken with fine sea salt.
Turn up the heat and heat the oil to 340°F. Meanwhile, coat the chicken breasts and wings. Carefully lower the chicken breasts into the hot oil and fry for 7 minutes, or until golden brown, cooked through, and crisp. Transfer to the rack, sprinkle with salt, and turn skin side up. Cook the wings for 6 minutes, or until golden brown and cooked through. Transfer the wings to the rack and turn off the heat. Arrange the chicken on a serving platter. Add the herb sprigs to the oil (which will still be hot) and let them cook and crisp for a few seconds, then arrange them over the chicken.
Note on Chicken Size: You may need to go to a farmers' market to get these small chickens. Grocery store chickens often run 3 to 4 pounds. They can, of course, be used in this recipe but if chickens in the 2-1/2- to 3-pound range are available to you, they're worth seeking out. They’re a little easier to cook properly at the temperatures we recommend here and, most important, pieces this size result in the optimal meat-to-crust proportion, which is such an important part of the pleasure of fried chicken.
Note: We let the chicken rest for 7 to 10 minutes after it comes out of the fryer so that it has a chance to cool down. If the chicken has rested for longer than 10 minutes, put the tray of chicken in a 400°F oven for a minute or two to ensure that the crust is crisp and the chicken is hot.
Chicken Brine
Makes 2 gallons
5 lemons, halved
24 bay leaves
1 bunch (4 ounces) flat-leaf parsley
1 bunch (1 ounce) thyme
1/2 cup clover honey
1 head garlic, halved through the equator
3/4 cup black peppercorns
2 cups (10 ounces) kosher salt, preferably Diamond Crystal
2 gallons water
The key ingredient here is the lemon, which goes wonderfully with chicken, as do the herbs: bay leaf, parsley, and thyme. This amount of brine will be enough for 10 pounds.
Combine all the ingredients in a large pot, cover, and bring to a boil. Boil for 1 minute, stirring to dissolve the salt. Remove from the heat and cool completely, then chill before using. The brine can be refrigerated for up to 3 days.

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