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Instructional Design


TITLE

Immigration in the United States at the Turn of the 20th Century

OVERVIEW

Students will utilize primary sources including pictures, manuscripts, and maps to study the changing pattern of immigration in the United States at the turn of the 20th century.

GOAL

Through the analysis of primary sources, students will gain an understanding of the changing patterns of immigration at the turn of the 20th century, as well as describe the immigrant experience in America.

OBJECTIVES

  • Students can effectively examine primary sources.
  • Students can differentiate between a primary and secondary source.
  • Students can identify the various reasons groups immigrated to the United States at the turn of the 20th century.
  • Students can describe an immigrant’s journey and arrival into the United States.
  • Students can understand the obstacles faced by new immigrants.
  • Students can explain immigrants’ experiences adjusting to a new culture in the United States.

 

INVESTIGATIVE QUESTIONS

  • Who is an immigrant?
  • Why do people leave their homeland to start a new life in another country?
  • How did immigrants adjust to life in the U.S.?
  • What does it mean to be an American?

TIME REQUIRED

 

This lesson should take place over 6-7 class periods consisting of 45 minutes each. Students will spend one class period examining primary sources and making connections and predictions.  Students will spend one to two class periods examining both primary and secondary sources to verify their predictions.  Students will then spend three to four class periods creating and designing their scrapbooks.

RECOMMENDED GRADE RANGE

Recommended grade range is for students in grades 6-8.

SUBJECT


Recommended area of study is social studies.

STANDARDS

·         The following IL social science goals and standards are met by student completion of this unit: 14.C.3., 14.D.3, 14.E.3., 16.C.3b, 16.D.3, 17.C.3c, and 18.C.3b.

 

·         The following common core standards are met by student completion of this unit:  W.7.8, W. 7.9b, RL.8.7, RL.8.7, SL.8.1, SL.8.2, W.8.2f, RH6-8.9.

 

CREDITS

 

Created and designed by Diane Haas

PREPARATION

MATERIALS USED

  • Primary Source Picture Set from the Library of Congress
  • Primary Source Interview Set from the Library of Congress
  • Analyzing Primary Sources – Photos worksheet
  • Analyzing Primary Sources – Interviews worksheet
  • Analyzing Primary Sources – Evaluation worksheet
  • Immigration in the United States at the Turn of the 20th Century power point (Please use download option in order to retain proper formatting.)
  • Immigration in the U.S. at the Turn of the 20th Century scrapbook project directions and rubric (Please use download option in order to retain proper formatting.)

RESOURCES USED

PROCEDURE

  1. Students will choose a photo upon walking into class.
  2. Students will study their photo individually and answer inquiry questions about it using the “Analyzing Primary Sources – Photos” worksheet.
  3. Students will then work with a partner or a small group, based on the background color of their photo. (Background colors will group similar photographs together i.e. the journey by boat, Ellis Island, work experiences, etc.)
  4. Students will study their photographs together and compare how their photos are similar based on their observations and reflections.  Students will record similar observations, reflections, and questions on a new copy of the “Analyzing Primary Sources – Photos” worksheet.
  5. Pairs/Small groups will record their common observations, reflections, and questions on chart paper and share them with the whole group.
  6. The students will be given one immigrant interview to read individually.
  7. After reading, students should answer questions on "Analyzing Primary Sources - Interviews" worksheet.
  8. The students will then form a small group with the other students who read the same interview.  They should discuss what they've read and written on their interview worksheets and add information gained from other members of the group to their own individual worksheets.
  9. The students will then form a new group made up of six students (jig saw) - one student who is an expert on each different interview and share a summary of their immigrant's experience orally with the group.  As a result, all students will be familiar with the stories of all six immigrants.
  10. The teacher will then present secondary source material to the students about immigration in the United States at the turn of the 20th century using the teacher-created power point.
  11. Students will then revisit their original photographs and interviews and answer questions using “Analyzing Primary Sources – Evaluation” worksheet.
  12. The teacher will then introduce and discuss the culminating scrapbook project with the students.

THE INQUIRY CYCLE

 

Connect – Students make observations of Library of Congress photos individually and in small groups, compare their observations with students studying similar photos, and make connections to their own experiences.

Wonder - Students develop questions and create predictions about the immigrant experience based on their study of primary source photos from the library of Congress.

InvestigateStudents will read both primary sources, including interviews with immigrants from the time period, and secondary sources, including a teacher-created power point, to learn about the lives of immigrants during this time period.  Students will also be encouraged to investigate their own families’ stories of how they came to the United States.

Construct - Students will evaluate their learning individually and with pairs/small groups by answering evaluation questions upon the completion of their study of primary and secondary sources.  They should be able to answer the questions they posed during the connecting/wondering portion of the lesson, as well as to relate to the experiences to their own lives.

ExpressStudents will apply their understanding of the lives of immigrants by creating a scrapbook detailing the story of an immigrant family. 

Reflect Students will look back on their learning through the answering of questions on the “Evaluation” worksheet.  In addition, in their scrapbooks, students will evaluate whether or not they felt the immigration experience was worth it.

 

EXTENSIONS

 

  • Students can explore the Immigration: Stories of Yesterday and Today website. On the website students can examine immigration data, take a virtual tour of Ellis Island, as well as hear stories of real kids who have recently immigrated to the United States.
  • Students can read Our Immigrants at Ellis Island, which is a book written for young people in 1912 that describes the reception, inspection, and experiences of immigrants in the detention-room and railway offices of Ellis Island.
  • Students can interview their own family members to learn their family’s history of immigration.

EVALUATION

Students will create and design a scrapbook displaying their understanding of the life of a U.S. immigrant at the turn of the 20th century.

 

 

 

 

 

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Diane Haas,
Jun 14, 2012, 7:25 AM
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Diane Haas,
Jun 14, 2012, 7:25 AM
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Diane Haas,
Jun 12, 2012, 6:28 PM
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Diane Haas,
Jun 12, 2012, 6:28 PM
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Diane Haas,
Jun 14, 2012, 11:38 AM
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Diane Haas,
Jun 12, 2012, 6:29 PM
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Diane Haas,
Jun 14, 2012, 9:53 AM
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Diane Haas,
Jun 14, 2012, 9:03 AM
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Diane Haas,
Jun 14, 2012, 8:03 AM