Digital Access Lecture

TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

My goal as an information science instructor is to train students to effectively seek, evaluate, synthesize and apply knowledge or data. I believe that in this fast-paced, networked society, students must be trained through experiential, shared and active learning. Whether virtual or face-to-face, the LIS classroom should be a hands-on collaboratory. I believe in merging rich content with open dialogue. I incorporate current events that can serve as case studies or journal articles that express novel ideas. I also make room for role play, debates, service learning, virtual field trips and guest speakers in the curriculum.

Teaching requires thoughtful architecture along with intentional flexibility. I try to continuously strengthen my knowledge of subject matter as well as teaching techniques by remaining abreast on emerging instructional approaches and tools. Instead of perceiving social media as a distraction, for instance, I leverage it for lecture participation, online office hours, and feedback. However, I am judicious when it comes to adopting trends; each educational accessory must substantially enrich the curriculum.

Finally, though adaptable when it comes to content delivery, I am stern in the area of performance and evaluation. I push students toward conscientiousness, and encourage them to to pursue their careers with a sense of purpose and professionalism. The values of universal access, personal growth, and community are germane to my pedagogical approach. I try to emphasize these ideals in my syllabus, course objectives, class website, curriculum design, material selection, activities, assessment and feedback.