Changing yourr job?

So you want to change your job?

These are simple common sense instructions and will depend on what you do for a living. For this illustration I will talk about people in administration: office managers, PA and secretaries, and clerks.

First of all, if you don’t want to be one in a hundred plus competing for a job, forget the newspapers and job agencies.

On your weekend and days off, look for companies around your home, note their name and address and anything they may have on an outside plaque. Then look for the next one, repeat.

Then get on your local public transport, go for one stop, and do the same, get the next bus or train and repeat.

Your objective is to try and build up a list of a hundred plus places to write to. And, companies you can get to easily, allowing extra time in bed in the mornings.

Research on the Internet, open up a database and build up information about the company. The more you collect, the more you will impress if you get an interview. Do it now, you don’t want to scramble about if you’re offered an interview.

Write, sending your CV to the HR manager. The date you send your letter is important. Presuming you are using second class stamps, read the following paragraph carefully.

People often hand in their resignations on the last working day of the month. It takes the system a couple of days before the HR manager decides what to do. Post your letter one working daysbefore the end of the month. Your letter will arrive at roughly the same time as the HR manager received the request for new staff.

Employment bureaux charge a lot of money and the HR manager may just decide to wheel you in for a quick interview before going to a bureau. You will be one amongst errr… one. Not bad odds and you might get the job.

Remember, a job may only become vacant for one out of a hundred letters.

I have done this, twice in my life – in the early days before I built up my own businesses.