FURNITURE STORES IN LAFAYETTE LA - IN LAFAYETTE LA

Furniture Stores In Lafayette La - Craftmaster Furniture Nc - Chair Furniture In.

Furniture Stores In Lafayette La


    furniture stores
  • (Furniture store) A commercial establishment wherein home or office furnishings and related accessories are sold to the ultimate consumer.
    lafayette la
  • Lafayette is a city in and the parish seat of Lafayette Parish, Louisiana, United States, on the Vermilion River. The population was 110,257 at the 2000 census; a 2007 census estimate put the metropolitan area's population at 256,494. It is the fourth largest city in the state.
furniture stores in lafayette la
furniture stores in lafayette la - Queen Size
Queen Size Bi-Fold Folding Bed Frame
Queen Size Bi-Fold Folding Bed Frame
Frame Open: 80"W x 60"D x 14"H Frame Folded: 40.25"W x 30.25"D x 5.5"H Flame Boxed: 43"W x 32"D x 7"H Finish: Black Material: Metal Queen Size Bi - Fold Bed Frame Provide maximum comfort during your most relaxing hours of the day, and versatile enough to be quadruple folded in under 15 seconds. Can be stored in a bed or closet, a queen-sized bi-fold Pragma Bed* frame only requires 40.25* x 30.25* x 5.5* of storage space. The Pragma Bed* bed base is engineered with heavy-duty wire mesh, which serves as a complete mattress support system that will not bend or sag over time. Provides a flat, sturdy, squeak-free base for your new memory foam mattress or even your old spring mattress. The bed base also provides you with more space than many other beds out there. The bed sits 14* off the ground, creating 38.69 cubic feet of storage space. Pragma Bed* bases do not require a box spring. The strong yet lightweight design can resist up to 1200 pounds per queen bed frame. The weight of the bed frame is 43 pounds only. Pragma Bed* frames are strong enough to withstand jumping, yet light enough to be carried up the steps. Unfold bed frame and snap legs into place. Using the two included screws, place them through the two holes and fasten the two pieces together. Place bed in desired location. If you wish to store your Pragma Bed* frame, just fold it up and hide it away. No tools assembly required.

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Society House Of The American Society Of Civil Engineers
Society House Of The American Society Of Civil Engineers
Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States of America Summary Built in 1896-97 to the French Renaissance Revival style design of architect Cyrus L.W. Eidlitz, the Society House of the American Society of Civil Engineers was the headquarters of the organization founded in 1852. As the engineering profession grew rapidly in the 19th century and its membership increased, ASCE needed a new building, said to be the first such project for a professional American engineering society. After a site was selected on West 57th Street, the wide cross-town thoroughfare with a distinguished history associated with the arts and various organizations for over a century, a limited design competition was held in 1896 and Eidlitz was selected. The Society House is clad in white glazed brick, with intricately-carved Indiana limestone ornament. The facade, dominated by an enframed elliptical ogee arch on the second story that is surmounted by a tripartite window group, is further embellished by smaller second-story ogee-arched lintels, quoins, and a modillioned cornice topped by a parapet. As its attendance increased, ASCE found it necessary to construct an annex in 1905-06; the design by Eidlitz & [Andrew C.] McKenzie continued that of the original portion. Eidlitz, often linked with commissions from the telephone industry, also produced a wide and distinguished variety of designs for public, institutional, and commercial structures. After ASCE moved in 1917 to new quarters, it retained ownership of its former Society House until 1966. Due to its close proximity to the “Automobile Row” section of Broadway, the building was leased in 1918-27 as offices and showrooms of the Ajax Rubber Co., one of the nation’s leading manufacturers of pneumatic tires, and in 1927-28 as a showroom for luxury Stearns-Knight automobiles. The 1918 ground-story alteration, by architect Arnold W. Brunner, included re-cladding and creation of wide storefront bays. From 1928 to 1973, this was the location of one of the Schrafft’s chain of restaurants, especially popular in its earlier years as a center for women’s dinners and functions. In 1975, the ground story was leased by Lee’s Art Shop, known for its traditional art supplies and operated by Gilbert and Ruth Steinberg, who purchased the building in 1994. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS West 57th Street: a Cultural Center of New York West 57th Street, particularly the blocks between Sixth Avenue and Broadway, is part of the wide cross-town thoroughfare that has sometimes evoked comparison to the elegant Rue de la Paix in Paris, and has been associated with the arts for over a century. In the early 1870s, town houses and mansions for New York’s elite began to be constructed along Fifth Avenue and the adjacent blocks on West 57th Street. Other structures began to pave the way for the neighborhood’s reputation as an artistic center. The Sherwood Studios (1880, attributed to John H. Sherwood; demolished), 58 West 57th Street, built by financier-art collector Sherwood; and the Rembrandt (1881, Hubert & Pirsson; demolished), 152 West 57th Street, organized by painter/minister Jared Flagg, were early apartment houses that provided large studio space for artists. The Osborne Apartments (1883-85, James E. Ware; 1889; 1906), 205 West 57th Street, was one of the largest and grandest apartment houses of its era and attracted numerous musicians over the years. Carnegie Hall (1889-95, William B. Tuthill), at the southeast corner of Seventh Avenue, became one of the nation’s most legendary concert halls; residential studios were added to the building in 1896-97 (Henry J. Hardenbergh). The American Fine Arts Society Building (1891-92, Hardenbergh), 215 West 57th Street, has been home to the Architectural League, Art Students League, and Society of American Artists, providing exhibition, classroom, and studio facilities; it was the site of “virtually every important exhibition of art and architecture held in the city” for many years. Later buildings that provided residential and working space for artists include the 130 and 140 West 57th Street Studio Buildings (1907-08, Pollard & Steinam) and the Rodin Studios (1916-17, Cass Gilbert), 200 West 57th Street. Additionally, there were the Society House of the American Society of Civil Engineers (1896-97, Cyrus L.W. Eidlitz), 220 West 57th Street; Lotos Club (1907, Donn Barber), 110 West 57th Street, a literary club founded in 1870; and the Louis H. Chalif Normal School of Dancing (1916, G.A. & H. Boehm), 163-165 West 57th Street, one of the earliest American schools to instruct teachers in dance. The Real Estate Record & Builders Guide commented in 1916 that the neighborhood “abounds in structures devoted to the cultivation of the arts.” As indicated in the Federal Writers’ Project’s New York City Guide in 1939, “the completion of Carnegie Hall in 1891 established the district as the foremost musical center of the country. M
Paris
Paris
INTERCONTINENTAL PARIS LE GRAND (*****L): Affectionately known as «Le Grand Hotel», the largest and most impressive palace hotel in Paris celebrates more than 150 years of history. Inaugurated on May 5, 1862 by Empress Eugenie, spouse of Napoleon the grand_hotel_paris_intercontinentalIIIrd, to the fanfare of an orchestra led by Offenbach, this was the largest hotel in the world. A gem in the heart of the entirely new district of the Opera House, finalizing Baron Haussman's pharaonic works to transform the old, unhealthy Paris into the «City of Lights». Kings, queens, maharajahs and sultans from all over the world have stayed in that caravanserai: from last Tsar and Tsarina of Russia and King Edward VII of England up to Queen Rania of Jordan. Victor Hugo hosted banquets at the hotel, and Emile Zola had his decadent and tragic heroine, Nana, die in a flowered room at the fourth floor. More than ever a famous and fashionable hotel, the InterContinental Paris Le Grand attracts lots of statesmen, fashion designers, international movie stars and directors who eventually used it as a dreamed shooting location (Polanki's «Frantic», Robert Altman’s «Prêt-à-Porter», etc.). Totally revamped in 2003 by its present owner, the InterContinental group, it retained the elements and amazing atmosphere of its original glory. The rooms design has been reestablished in the Second Empire style. Many parts of the actual hotel kept their original decor. The Salon Opéra, for instance: the most sought after ballroom in Paris, known all around the world thanks to the high-fashion shows, is well worth the visit. Another landmark, the legendary Café de la Paix, which is a precious part of the Grand Hôtel, is a treasure of Empire-style architecture, where the ceiling, columns and wall painting have been carefully restored. When some illustrious Parisian palace-hotels live out of their former glory -the neighboring Ritz is a an example on how a legend can go downhill- the Grand Hôtel, a modern product in 1862, still get it all in 2011 to seduce nostalgic and geek travellers alike. Shouldn't it be for the pay-per-use Internet in the rooms (but free-of-charge in all public areas and Club Lounge), we would say that our stay was 99% faultless; which is rare enough to be mentioned. All 470 rooms and suites are lovely: including those oriented to the inner courtyards and monumental glass-roofed bar-restaurant «La Verrière». We loved the classy furniture, precious fabrics, and sumptuous bathrooms with L'Occitane toiletry. Concealing the latest technologies: high-tech air-conditioning systems, up to 40 television channels from across the world on flat plasma screens, films on request, dual telephone lines and high-speed Internet connections, they have it all to make you feel like in Paris. We would nevertheless recommend anybody visiting the French capital city for the first time, or on a romantic trip, to straightly book into one of the rooms with a dramatic view on the Opera House. The higher the better: the InterContinental Club rooms are splendid, comparable with what one could ever expect from a more expensive palace-hotel in Paris, just like Crillon or Meurice. Well worth the EUR 60 extra charge to the basic room rate, they come with an unexpected bonus which we used very much: the classy VIP salon (Club Lounge), actually unique in Paris where no palace offers this treatment, is open to the club’s guests. Spacious, covering two levels, it overlooks Paris and, of course, the Opera House. The Club Lounge opens early in the morning, serving a fine breakfast which we enjoyed the first day only; alternating, the day after, with the traditional, so classy Parisian -and Japanese!- breakfast experience provided in style by Le Café de la Paix. The Club Lounge serves yummy, top quality hot and cold snacks (our memory -and scale- can't forget the delicious home-made «Foie Gras» and unforgettable, mouth watering macaroons!), fine wines and Champagne; employing a well trained, very educated and thoughtful staff. This is what we would call the first class section in a first class hotel. We loved the bar, opening onto the Verrière conservatory: a superb, ritzy and romantic winter garden with a fine restaurant. The «Spa by Algotherm», splendid and well appointed, is the only spa in the centre of Paris to offer the benefits of thalassotherapy: revitalizing and relaxing sea water treatments, beauty care, traditional and oriental massages. The Gym features a running machine, electronic cycling machines, steppers, body-building apparatus and a sauna. The hotel is so large that we didn't realized that the InterContinental Paris Le Grand is, first of all, a top class convention venue, with more than 21 meeting rooms and ballrooms. So many visitors, and still so much intimacy... In the heart of the capital’s bustling business district, just a step from the main tourist sights, department stores (Galeries Lafayette, Le Printemps), and luxury boutiques,

furniture stores in lafayette la
furniture stores in lafayette la
Maximillien de Lafayette's "De La Croix" Paintings, Posters & Lithographs: Progressive Neo Cubism. 3rd Edition. (De Lafayette Neo Cubism)
Maximillien De Lafayette was the last hurrah of the greatest Neo Cubism Pioneer of our generation. . ."-Dr. John Chen, Laureate of the United Nations/UNESCO. Former Member of The White House Presidential Committee-Convention on Information Service and Library Sciences. Washington, DC., USA, 1980. This very rare art book is designed as a Prints collection of Posters and Lithographs published one by one on separate sheets suitable for framing. So each page is actually a beautiful poster by itself, ready to cut and frame. You will have a stunning art display on your walls. Exquisite colors, breath-taking paintings of a rare beauty. The authors searched the globe to find these treasures; all produced by the legendary Maximillien de Lafayette (De La Croix) the original creator of the European Progressive Neo Cubism in the late sixties/early seventies. The artist's contribution to this collectors' item book adds an extra dimension of veracity, importance, and value to the contents of the book, and the choice of his masterpieces. You will treasure this book for years to come. A true artistic gem.

Maximillien De Lafayette was the last hurrah of the greatest Neo Cubism Pioneer of our generation. . ."-Dr. John Chen, Laureate of the United Nations/UNESCO. Former Member of The White House Presidential Committee-Convention on Information Service and Library Sciences. Washington, DC., USA, 1980. This very rare art book is designed as a Prints collection of Posters and Lithographs published one by one on separate sheets suitable for framing. So each page is actually a beautiful poster by itself, ready to cut and frame. You will have a stunning art display on your walls. Exquisite colors, breath-taking paintings of a rare beauty. The authors searched the globe to find these treasures; all produced by the legendary Maximillien de Lafayette (De La Croix) the original creator of the European Progressive Neo Cubism in the late sixties/early seventies. The artist's contribution to this collectors' item book adds an extra dimension of veracity, importance, and value to the contents of the book, and the choice of his masterpieces. You will treasure this book for years to come. A true artistic gem.

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