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American Lawyers Company


american lawyers company
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  • (The American Lawyer) The American Lawyer is a monthly law magazine published by ALM. It was founded in 1979 by Steven Brill.
    company
  • Associate with; keep company with
  • small military unit; usually two or three platoons
  • an institution created to conduct business; "he only invests in large well-established companies"; "he started the company in his garage"
  • Accompany (someone)
  • be a companion to somebody
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Notes on the American Decisions (1912)
Notes on the American Decisions (1912)
Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: necessary in the prosecution of a misdemeanor which was not an indictable offense at common law. 44 AM. REP. 483, HAWKINS v. RAGSDALE, 80 KY. 353. Decree of divorce obtained in one jurisdiction as bar to right to recover in another jurisdiction. Cited in Atherton v. Atherton, 181 U. S. 155, 45 L. ed. 794, 21 Sup. Ct. Rep. 544 (indirectly reversing 82 Hun, 179, 31 N. Y. Supp. 977) holding a decree of divorce obtained by husband in state of domicil by constructive service on wife who had abandoned him and moved to another state, bar to wife's petition for divorce in state she has moved to. Recognition by courts of divorce of foreign jurisdiction. Cited in Haddock v. Haddock, 201 U. S. 562, 60 L. ed. 867, 26 Sup. Ct Rep. 525, 6 A.

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David Stewart Elliott
David Stewart Elliott
Co. G, 13th PA. Infantry, Co. E, 76th PA. Infantry during the Civil war and Co. G, 20th KS. Infantry during the Spanish American War. CAPT. DAVID STEWART ELLIOTT. For more than half a century the name Elliott has been one of important associations with Kansas history. The quality of public service has distinguished the family in all generations. The first of the name in Kansas was a Pennsylvania soldier, also named David Stewart Elliott, who was killed by Quantrell's band of raiders during the Civil war. The late Capt. David Stewart Elliott of Coffeyville, long known as a lawyer, editor, fraternal organizer, and soldier, also gave up his life as a sacrifice to the country during the Philippine war. Several of the children of the late Captain Elliott are filling worthy places in their respective spheres, including his daughter, Miss Leila C. Elliott, who is now city treasurer of Coffeyville. David Stewart Elliott, father of the late Captain Elliott, was born at Lewistown, Pennsylvania, was reared and educated and married in that state, and was an editor by profession. He served as a soldier in the Mexican war; and though quite an old man at the time he enlisted in 1861 in a Pennsylvania regiment of infantry. He was in the service in Kansas, and his company was on its way to Fort Smith to assist in repelling the Price invasion of Missouri and Kansas when he was killed by Quantrell's men at Baxter Springs. This was in 1864. He and others of the command were captured by the Quantrell raiders, were lined up against the wall and all shot. This Pennsylvania soldier whose record deserves special mention in any history of Kansas had only one child, the late Capt. David Stewart Elliott. The mother of Captain Elliott was born at Everett, Pennsylvania, in 1822 and died at Coffeyville in 1892. At Everett, Pennsylvania, Capt. David Stewart Elliott was born December 23, 1843. When about fifteen years of age he entered a newspaper office to learn the printing trade and in April, 1861, enlisted in Company G of the Thirteenth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. That was a three months' regiment, and at the end of his term he re-enlisted in Company E of the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was with that command for more than three years. In 1868 he became editor of the Bedford County Press at Everett, Pennsylvania, and continued in that capacity until 1873. On February 9, 1869, he was admitted to the bar of Bedford County, but after practicing a few years resumed his work as editor and was editor of the Everett Press from 1881 to 1885. In May, 1885, Captain Elliott became a member of the Montgomery County Bar, locating at Coffeyville, but soon answered the call to his old profession as a newspaper man and from June 5, 1885, to September 1, 1897, edited the Coffeyville Weekly Journal. Early in 1892 he established the Daily Journal, and was also its editor until 1897. In May, 1898, the Twentieth Kansas Regiment was enlisted for the Spanish-American war, and Company G was recruited at Independence, consisting for the most part of Montgomery County boys. The officers of the company were: D. Stewart Elliott, captain; H. A. Scott of Sycamore, first lieutenant; and William A. McTaggart, son of Senator McTaggart, second lieutenant. As every Kansan knows, the Twentieth Kansas made its record of achievement in the Philippines. Captain Elliott, whose qualifications as a military leader were enhanced by his previous service in the Civil war, went with the regiment to the Philippines early in 1899, and while in line of duty at Calocan, just north of Manila, on February 28, 1899, was shot by a Filipino sharpshooter and died a few hours later. His remains were brought home and on April 14, 1899, were laid to rest at Coffeyville with military honors. He had entered the Civil war at the age of seventeen, and he was in his fifty-sixth year when death came to him in the Far East. Something of Captain Elliott's talents and characteristics can be learned by a brief quotation from an old history of Montgomery County: "After locating in the county Captain Elliott devoted only a portion of his time to the practice of law. His tastes led to the formation of his fellow men into associations, political parties and other organizations, and the promulgation and advocacy of their principles, rather than to the irksome and methodical work demanded in the practice of law. For this work of his choice he was by nature admirably equipped. He was a fluent and pleasant speaker and at once took a leading part in meetings to effect such organizations, or to advocate their tenets. As a writer he was terse, graceful and effective, and as a soldier enthusiastic and courageous. During his residence in Coffeyville Captain Elliott was its attorney for one or more terms and a member one term of the lower house of the Kansas Legislature, where he was at once a conspicuous member. At his death he was a member of sixteen lodges." Captain Elliott was
Thomas Franklin Burke
Thomas Franklin Burke
Company A, 116th Illinois Infantry South Kansas Tribune, Wednesday, June 20, 1917, Pg. 5: Death of an Honored Citizen In the passing of Thomas Franklin Burke, who died at the age of 75 years Wednesday, while sitting in his chair while his wife was preparing to walk up town with him, the county lost a good citizen. He was born in Macon county, Illinois, and served his country in the 116th Illinois, Company A, and was with the General Grant campaigns down the Mississippi, at Vicksburg and across Tennessee, with Fifteenth Army Corps. At Ezra Chapel he was struck by a rebel bullet and lost an eye. After returning from the hospital he was with the army that chased Hood to the Tennessee River and later marched with Sherman. In the battle at Fort Waggoner he was color sergeant and the first man to plant the Union flag on the breastworks, around which the victorious army rallied and won the battle. He was with those who marched through Raleigh and on to Petersburg and Richmond, and it was the pride of his life to have had a place in the grand review at Washington, and was discharged at Springfield, Ill. Oct. 22, 1871, he was united in marriage with Miss Ellen Nesmith, who has been a loving, faithful wife. In the early eighties Mr. and Mrs. Burke came to Kansas, locating in Sycamore where they resided many years until he was elected register of deeds and re-elected serving four years. He has been a faithful trustee of the county high school for many years and its treasurer at his death. The funeral was held at his home and very largely attended by the friends. And his pastor and neighbor Rev. F. L. Pettit of the Christian Church paid high tribute to his character as a citizen and soldier. There was present at the funeral his widow, son Arthur of Denver, and daughters, Bessie and husband Attorney William Brown of Iola, and Alice, wife of Professor Humes. The son Walter could not be reached by telegram. At the cemetery the Grand Army conducted the beautiful funeral ceremony and Rev F. L. Pettit pronounced the benediction. From History of Montgomery County, Kansas, By Its Own People, published by L. Wallace Duncan, Iola, Kansas, 1903, pgs. 378-380: THOMAS FRANKLIN BURKE – Ex-register of deeds, Thomas F. Burke of Independence, has resided in Montgomery county twenty years. Fourteen years of that time he was engaged in farming in Sycamore township, and only abandoned rural pursuits to assume public office, to which he had just been chosen. After five years of official service, in one of the most important positions in the gift of the people of Montgomery county, he retired, and became a member of the real estate firm of Heady & Burke. Mr. Burke’s parents were early settlers of Macon county, Illinois, Micajah Burke, his father, emigrating from Hardin county, Kentucky, in 1832, and founding the family on the bleak prairies of the “Sucker State.” Virginia was the original American home of the family, and early in the century just past, John H. Burke, grandfather of our subject, joined the throng of immigrants to Kentucky, remained there some years, and accompanied his son, Micajah, into Macon county, Illinois, where he died in 1854. He was a shoemaker by trade, married and had a family of two sons and six daughters. James Burke was his other son and he brought up a family in Illinois. Micajah Burke was born in Virginia in 1803 and died in 1863. The labor of the farm furnished him with employment through life and he and his wife, nee Lucy Ann Pasley, of Kentucky, reared a family of sever children. Mrs. Burke was a daughter of Rev. Henry H. Pasley, a Methodist minister of Hardin county, who was a native of the State of Kentucky. Mrs. (Pasley) Burke died in 1892, at seventy-two years of age, being the mother of: John H., of Macon county, Illinois; James W., deceased; Robert Y., of Iola Kansas; Thomas F., Adelpha C., deceased, wife of Henry Stevens of Macon county, Illinois; Joseph W., of the home county in Illinois; and Lewis D., of Pueblo, Colorado. Thomas F. Burke grew up in the country where school advantages were not of the first order. His enlistment in the army, for service in the Civil War, marked his exit from the domestic and parental fireside. He joined Company “A”, One Hundred and Sixteenth Illinois Infantry, first, Col. Tupper, and later, Co. Maddox. The regiment formed a part of Grant’s Army, operating on the Mississippi river, and its first engagement, in which Mr. Burke participated, was at Haines Bluff. Then came Champion Hills, and the siege and capture of Vicksburg. The army then came up the river to Memphis, and started on its journey from there to join the Federal troops, operating in the east. Mr. Burke took part in the Missionary Ridge battle and was present with his regiment, at the relief of Gen. Burnside at Knoxville, Tennessee. During that winter, the command with which Mr. Burke was serving, was stationed at Larkinsville, Alabama, and the following spring, it took u

american lawyers company
american lawyers company
Equal: Women Reshape American Law
The dramatic, untold story of how women battled blatant inequities in America's legal system.
As late as 1967, men outnumbered women twenty to one in American law schools. With the loss of deferments from Vietnam, law schools admitted women to avoid plummeting enrollments. As women entered, the law resisted. Judges would not hire women. Law firms asserted a right to discriminate against women. Judges permitted discrimination against pregnant women. Courts viewed sexual harassment as, one judge said, "a game played by the male superiors." Against the odds, women fought to reshape the law. Fred Strebeigh has interviewed litigators, plaintiffs, and judges, including Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Catharine MacKinnon, and has done research in their private archives as well as those of other attorneys who took cases to the Supreme Court to make the law equal and just for all.