THE HISTORY OF CANADIAN HOCKEY. THE HISTORY OF

The history of canadian hockey. Womens world hockey championships.

The History Of Canadian Hockey


the history of canadian hockey
    canadian hockey
  • Ice hockey (hockey in countries where it is the most popular form of hockey) is a team sport played on ice, in which skaters use sticks to direct a puck into the opposing team's goal. It is a fast-paced physical sport.
    history
  • a record or narrative description of past events; "a history of France"; "he gave an inaccurate account of the plot to kill the president"; "the story of exposure to lead"
  • The whole series of past events connected with someone or something
  • the discipline that records and interprets past events involving human beings; "he teaches Medieval history"; "history takes the long view"
  • The study of past events, particularly in human affairs
  • The past considered as a whole
  • the aggregate of past events; "a critical time in the school's history"
the history of canadian hockey - Illustrated Guide
Illustrated Guide to Hockey Sites & History: Toronto
Illustrated Guide to Hockey Sites & History: Toronto
From the historic Granite Club to the ultra-modern Air Canada Centre, Steven Sandor takes hockey fans on a memorable tour of Toronto. Each chapter focuses on a different hockey site in Canada s largest city, explaining why the location is so important to Toronto s and to Canada s rich hockey culture. Combining lively text with contemporary and historic photographs, Illustrated Guide to Hockey Sites & History: Toronto enables fans to undertake self-guided tours of the city s rich hockey history. A map shows each site s location and how or if it s accessible from the TTC subway. If you re thirsty after your tour, you can choose where to watch a game from a list of the best watering holes that have big-screen TVs. And if your team is losing, you can try your hand at the Toronto hockey trivia challenge at the back of the book. Whether you visit these sites in person or as an armchair traveller, this book is an entertaining read about Toronto s hockey landmarks.

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::: CANADIAN AVIATION
::: CANADIAN AVIATION
AN IN-PROPORTIONALLY LARGE part of Canadian history revolves around aviation. BASICALLY nothing happened in Canada, until we embraced the world of aviation. Nothing? Nothing. And then, we almost went to the moon. By ourselves. Canadian innovation. We didn't have much as a nation. And we were pretty small, population wise. But, by gosh, we ran with what we had— 'Course you'll never learn that in school. Elementary, collegiate, or post-secondary. Oh, no. Let's talk about Louis Riel, Pierre Trudeau, the suffragettes, …etc. Hey! Let's not… … and say we did. WAY BACK IN GRADE 8, I had a crush on an attractive little blond girl. Course, a lotta' guys in my class did. And we had some hockey stars, and some hunks, a guitar player or two, and a whole bunch of other guys that would appeal to a little girl a lot more than I would. I mean these were the days before my weightlifting, wrestling, and boxing obsessions. I mean, I was pretty nerdy kid. So I would talk about the only thing I knew. Those mighty, mighty Lancs. I mean, I was just a dumb little kid. Well, she laughed, and she laughed hard. And she laughed often. And soon enough everybody was jeering at my mighty, mighty Lanc stories. Course, it only got worse. I had just about given up. And, I had just about tossed in the towel because the object of my affection was further away than ever. But then again, we're Canadians. And we never give up, and of course, we never say quit. Unless you're born out of that "New" Canada. Then you can, and will do, whatever. So I took the ridicule. And I waited. And then something extraordinary happened. All stars the aligned. And almost overnight. She came over to me one day, and smiled. She said, "You know I saw a special last night on TV that had these Lancasters flying in it. There were all these people walking around and…" That's when I cut her off. "You mean, they were talking about my mighty, mighty Lancs!?" "No", she quietly responded, "They were talking about OUR mighty, mighty, Lancs." "Do you want to walk me home, today?" "Yes, I believe I do—" There are people who say we can't rebuild Canada. That we're done. Well… I don't think so. They also say there will be no more great stories of Canadian innovation. And that's where I cut them off. Folks, it all unravelled with the Avro Arrow, and that's what we have to go back to. That's where we have to begin. Again. A new Arrow. Several marks to meet the varying, but ever-present defence needs of Canada. But that will be just the beginning. That is only a start, towards a renewed national independence and a more enlightened nation-building policy. Since that IS where we lost our Canadian soul, that IS where we have to take it back. We have to re-establish Avro Canada. We can't go forward…until we go all the way back. Yes, even past the Arrow… to the Jetliner! But… I'm showing too much of my hand. 'nuff said.
Wayne Gretsky Puck
Wayne Gretsky Puck
Had this puck signed in 1998 in NYC. Wayne Douglas Gretzky, OC (born January 26, 1961) is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey player. He is the current part-owner, head of hockey operations and head coach of the Phoenix Coyotes of the National Hockey League (NHL). Born and raised in Brantford, Ontario, Gretzky honed his skills at a backyard rink and regularly played minor hockey at a level far above his peers.[1]Despite his unimpressive stature, strength, and speed, Gretzky's intelligence and reading of the game were unrivaled. He was adept at dodging checks from opposing players, and he could consistently anticipate where the puck was going to be and execute the right move at the right time. Gretzky also became known for setting up behind the net, an area that was nicknamed "Gretzky's office" because of his skills there.[2] In 1978, he signed with the Indianapolis Racers of the World Hockey Association (WHA), where he briefly played before being traded to the Edmonton Oilers. When the WHA folded, the Oilers joined the NHL, where he established many scoring records and led his team to four Stanley Cup Championships. His trade to the Los Angeles Kings had an immediate impact on the team's performance, leading them to the 1993 Cup finals, and is credited with popularizing hockey in the southern United States. Gretzky played briefly for the St. Louis Blues and finished his career with the New York Rangers. In his career, Gretzky captured nine Hart Trophies as the most valuable player, ten Art Ross Trophies for most points in a season, five Lady Byng Trophies for sportsmanship and performance, five Lester B. Pearson Awards, and two Conn Smythe Trophies as playoff MVP. After his retirement in 1999, he was immediately inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, being the last player to have the waiting period waived. He became Executive Director for the Canadian national men's hockey team during the 2002 Winter Olympics, where the team won a gold medal. In 2000 he became part owner of the Phoenix Coyotes, and following the 2004–05 NHL lockout he became their head coach. Nicknamed "The Great One", Gretzky was called "the greatest player of all time" in Total Hockey: The Official Encyclopedia of the NHL.[3] He is generally regarded as the best player in the history of the NHL,[4][5] and has been called "the greatest hockey player ever" by many sportswriters[6][7] players,[8] and coaches. Upon his retirement on April 18 1999, he held forty regular-season records, fifteen playoff records, and six All-Star records.[9] He is the only NHL player to total over 200 points in one season—a feat he accomplished four times. In addition, he tallied over 100 points in 15 NHL seasons, 13 of them consecutively. He is the only player to have his number (99) officially retired by the NHL for all teams.

the history of canadian hockey
the history of canadian hockey
Canadian Hockey Literature
Hockey occupies a prominent place in the Canadian cultural lexicon, as evidenced by the wealth of hockey-centred stories and novels published within Canada. In this exciting new work, Jason Blake takes readers on a thematic journey through Canadian hockey literature, examining five common themes - nationhood, the hockey dream, violence, national identity, and family - as they appear in hockey fiction.
Blake examines the work of such authors as Mordecai Richler, David Adams Richards, Paul Quarrington, and Richard B. Wright, arguing that a study of contemporary hockey fiction exposes a troubled relationship with the national sport. Rather than the storybook happy ending common in sports literature of previous generations, Blake finds that today's fiction portrays hockey as an often-glorified sport that in fact leads to broken lives and ironic outlooks. The first book to focus exclusively on hockey in print, Canadian Hockey Literature is an accessible work that challenges popular perceptions of a much-beloved national pastime.

Hockey occupies a prominent place in the Canadian cultural lexicon, as evidenced by the wealth of hockey-centred stories and novels published within Canada. In this exciting new work, Jason Blake takes readers on a thematic journey through Canadian hockey literature, examining five common themes - nationhood, the hockey dream, violence, national identity, and family - as they appear in hockey fiction.
Blake examines the work of such authors as Mordecai Richler, David Adams Richards, Paul Quarrington, and Richard B. Wright, arguing that a study of contemporary hockey fiction exposes a troubled relationship with the national sport. Rather than the storybook happy ending common in sports literature of previous generations, Blake finds that today's fiction portrays hockey as an often-glorified sport that in fact leads to broken lives and ironic outlooks. The first book to focus exclusively on hockey in print, Canadian Hockey Literature is an accessible work that challenges popular perceptions of a much-beloved national pastime.

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