WICKES FURNITURE AND - FURNITURE AND

WICKES FURNITURE AND - PUB HEIGHT PATIO FURNITURE - LOW PRICE FURNITURE STORE.

Wickes Furniture And


wickes furniture and
    wickes furniture
  • Across the United States a large number of local stores and store chains became defunct between the 1950s, when modern shopping centers were introduced, and the 1980s, when many chains were either consolidated or liquidated. Some have been lost due to mergers.
wickes furniture and - Wallmonkeys Peel
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Decals - Edel-wicke - - 24"H x 16"W Removable Graphic
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Decals - Edel-wicke - - 24"H x 16"W Removable Graphic
WallMonkeys wall graphics are printed on the highest quality re-positionable, self-adhesive fabric paper. Each order is printed in-house and on-demand. WallMonkeys uses premium materials & state-of-the-art production technologies. Our white fabric material is superior to vinyl decals. You can literally see and feel the difference. Our wall graphics apply in minutes and won't damage your paint or leave any mess. PLEASE double check the size of the image you are ordering prior to clicking the 'ADD TO CART' button. Our graphics are offered in a variety of sizes and prices.
WallMonkeys are intended for indoor use only.
Printed on-demand in the United States Your order will ship within 3 business days, often sooner. Some orders require the full 3 days to allow dark colors and inks to fully dry prior to shipping. Quality is worth waiting an extra day for!
Removable and will not leave a mark on your walls.
'Fotolia' trademark will be removed when printed.
Our catalog of over 10 million images is perfect for virtually any use: school projects, trade shows, teachers classrooms, colleges, nurseries, college dorms, event planners, and corporations of all size.

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Lone Star Toys - Die-Cast Tractor
Lone Star Toys - Die-Cast Tractor
Lone Star Products Ltd. was the name used by British company Die Cast Machine Tools Ltd (DCMT) for its toy products. DCMT was based in Welham Green, Hertfordshire, north of London. Lone Star history: Starting in 1949, the company manufactured die cast toys for children. The Lone Star name was chosen because of a demand at the time for toy guns and rifles popular in the Western films in cinemas all over Britain. The company also made tie-in toy guns licensed from the James Bond films and The Man From U.N.C.L.E. TV series. Other early models included large numbers of hand painted toy soldier figures, mostly military, with some cowboy and Native American examples. Other figures were Thunderball frogmen. Additional figures were licensed from children's series and included Noddy, Popeye and Zorro. Initially the soldiers were made in hollow cast lead, but later changed to plastic. Production may have begun as early as 1939, continuing to 1947 in 'The Bridge Garage', Green Lanes, Palmers Green, London, N.13. Reportedly, from 1941 - 1942 temporary additional premises were opened on Pembroke Road, Muswell Hill, London, N.10. From 1947 - 1956 the 'River Works', 152 Green Lanes, Palmers Green, London, N.13 were in operation. In 1956, a milestone occurred with the move to purpose-built factory of 37,000 sq. at 168 Great North Road, Hatfield, Hertfordshire. In 1958, another factory was acquired at Ambridge, Gower and Mills, Holloways Lane, Welham Green, Hatfield, Hertfordshire. Vehicles: Following the lead of Dinky Toys, Lone Star started producing diecast model jet liners in 1959 with its 2-5-0 Series. To keep up with competitors such as Corgi and Dinky, Lone Star began producing diecast toy vehicles in 1960 with a rapidly expanding range under names like 'Lone Star Flyers', the superb range of OO scale (1/76th) and 'Lone Star Impy' vehicles, which were uniformly about three and a half inches long (varying between 1:43 and 1:50 scales). Thus like Matchbox, vehicle sizes seemed to adhere more to a particular size than to a particular scale. A 1:50 scale Austin FX4 London Taxi. This model simply says 'Lone Star Made in England' on the base.Discovering a Lone Star vehicle and reading its base could be confusing as to the manufacturer. Some of the Impy Toys read thus: 'Lone Star Road-Master Impy Super Cars'. To add to the confusion, elsewhere on the base, it would usually say DCMT. 'Roadmaster' was spelled with and without the hyphen. Apparently, Lone Star had a verbosity problem and, interpreted another way, the image could be quite amusing: 'Texan street authority fantastic small sly cars (DCMT)'. Other 1:50 scale vehicles simply said, 'Lone Star Made in England' on the base. Packaging was colored similar to Corgi and especially Dinky, with red and yellow panels, but castings, though handsome, seemed a bit cruder than the competition. For example, most Lone Stars have simpler bumper, grille and body detail than Corgi or Dinky. Later 1960s models commonly had orange tinted plastic transparent windows, but no interior detail. Head and tail lights were emphasized with silver or red paint - plastic lenses or jewels were seldom used. In the beginning, wheels were diecast plain or painted metal, but by the later 1960s a good-looking eight spoke plastic wheel was introduced. Tyres in the late 1960s were hard ribbed plastic which were advertised as 'non-scratch'. Perhaps this was supposed to appeal to parents who were afraid junior would mark the furniture with the toys Trains: Under the 'Lone Star Locos' name, the company produced (OOO scale), 2mm to the foot, British and American outline model push-along-trains in 1957. These utilised 8.25mm gauge metal track and a range of diecast station buildings. This line was designed by long term Lone Star employee Stuart Goss, and followed in 1960 by 'Treble-0-Lectric' electrically powered working models of two British diesel locomotives: The Class 24 Sulzer Type 2 diesel, the Class 23 Napier Type 2 'Baby Deltic' diesel, an American Baldwin 0-8-0 Steam Locomotive and an F7 US Diesel Electric loco which was available in both US and Canadian liveries. These were accompanied by track, British and Continental outline rolling stock, scenic items and other accessories, such as the 'Gulliver County' range of rubber moulded buildings in 2mm scale. Vacuum-formed bases were available to form 'instant' scenic layouts and these could be purchased separately or in sets. The electric train models were reasonably well received in the Model Railway press of the time (although some felt that the rubber band drive would be somewhat awkward for children to change) and essentially showed that a viable 2mm to the foot system could be designed, manufactured and marketed in the UK. Lone Star Treble-O-Lectric trains essentially introduced the concept that would later become British "N" gauge - 10 years ahead of the competition. However, limited toy trade distribution, the existence
20 years later and the Gimbels Labelscar still remains on Century III Mall
20 years later and the Gimbels Labelscar still remains on Century III Mall
I took this photo in April 2009 shortly after the Steve & Barry's Signage was removed from the Mall's exterior. At first I thought it was a scar of TJ Maxx, but upon further inspection, I realized it was in fact Gimbels! Not really surprising considering that the Gimbels name was on the building for about ten years, longer than any other tenant in this space. However, I would have thought that this would have long been washed away considering the history of this space. In the planning stages of the mall, this space was intended to be Horne's. however according to a Post-Gazette article from march 1979, it was stated that it was "Just a gentleman's agreement" between the DeBartolo Corporation and The Joseph Horne Company. However once Gimbels expressed interest in becoming the fifth anchor, Horne's respectfully backed down, and would later end up coming to the mall in 1985 after the closure of the Montgomery Ward store. For the lifetime of this space, It was originally Gimbels that opened up in March of 1980 as part of the Phase II Grand Opening of Century III Mall in West Mifflin, PA. Then in 1986, BATUS Inc., The company that owned Gimbels decided that the Gimbels name was not as profitable as its Saks Fifth Avenue chain and others that it owned at the time. BATUS sold the Gimbels chain to the Ohio based Consolidated Stores Co. Consolidated began liquidation sales at all of the 36 remaining stores from the once world famous Gimbels chain, and then closed all but one, The Century III Mall store. Consolidated sub-leased the loacation and kept the Gimbels name to sell discounted merchandise, but according to Century III executives at the time, they were not a full-time department store as they did not regularly offer a general line of clothing and housewares. Then in January of 1988, Consolidated lost its lease for the store. It was the last Gimbels store in the country and the world to close its doors. Then the store would be leased for seasonal tenant use for the 88-91 holiday seasons. In 1992, the former Gimbels space was shortened on both levels to become 2/3 of the original size. The reason for this is that it was too large, and the mall needed more retail space. A portion of the lower level that was removed was remodeled into the Ruby Tuesday restaurant and the new entrance with the lit logo above the doors. After this, the upper and lower floors were treated as separate spaces. The upper level went through a few changes: Marshall's(1993), Wicke's Furniture (1996), Dick's Sporting Goods (2002).The lower level went through a couple changes as well: TJ Maxx (1993), and Steve & Barry's (2002). Steve & Barry's filed for bankruptcy in December 2008 and quickly began its liquidation sales at all of its locations, including the Century III store. The Steve & Barry's store finally closed in January 2009, afterward the interior and exterior signage would remain for a few months before finally being removed.

wickes furniture and
wickes furniture and
Scene Church Amboise France 1855 Charles Wickes Print
Old Antique Historical Victorian Prints Maps and Historic Fine Art ----------. Scene Church Amboise France 1855 Charles Wickes Print Large Print Of A Church From English Churches By Charles Wickes 1855A Series Of Large Uncoloured Lithograph Views Of English Churches By The Victorian Architect Charles Wickes And Published In London By William Mort Thompson, 32 Sackville Street And Ackermann And Company, 96 Strand. Some Prints Are Of Single Churches And Are Embellished With Interesting Figures Of The Period. Sizes Are In The Region Of 12 1/2 X 18 Inches ( 305 X 460 ) Plus A Title In Decorative Gothic Letteringover 150 Years Old And Not Modern Copies

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