COCHRANE FURNITURE COMPANY. FURNITURE COMPANY

Cochrane Furniture Company. Boyles Furniture Sale. Furniture Oval Table.

Cochrane Furniture Company


cochrane furniture company
    furniture company
  • a company that sells furniture
    cochrane
  • Warp drive is a faster-than-light (FTL) propulsion system in the setting of many science fiction works, most notably Star Trek.
  • Cochrane is a surname with multiple independent origins, two Scottish and one Irish. One Scottish version originates from a place in Scotland, and both the Irish surname and the other Scottish surname are anglicisations for a Gaelic language surname.
  • Cochrane was a provincial electoral district in southern Alberta, Canada. The district was mandated to return a single member to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from 1909 to 1926 under the First Past the Post voting system and under Single Transferable Vote from 1926 to 1940.
cochrane furniture company - Photo S.
Photo S. Harris, Wash.; Cochrane , Phil. 1925
Photo S. Harris, Wash.; Cochrane , Phil. 1925
The National Photo Company Collection documents virtually all aspects of Washington, D.C., life. During the administrations of Presidents Wilson, Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover, the National Photo Company supplied photographs of current news events in Washington, D.C., as a daily service to its subscribers. It also prepared sets of pictures on popular subjects and undertook special photographic assignments for local businesses and government agencies. The images date between ca. 1850 and 1945; the bulk of the images were created between 1909 and 1932. Photo S. Harris, Wash.; Cochrane , Phil. 1925. Reprint is 20 in. x 17 in. on archival quality photo paper.

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VIC 56
VIC 56
Origins of the VICs Vic 56 is technically a steam coasting lighter or a "puffer". She is one of the 98 Victualling Inshore Craft built to the orders of the ministry of war transport between 1941 and 1945, which were a part of the enormous Government wartime ship-building programme. A programme in which, in addition to the more famous warships, built thousands of merchant ships of every size down to small coastal traders and tugs (Empire and TID classes.) The first series of VIC craft were based on a classic Scottish puffer design, of the general type that had carried cargo throughout the Western Isles, and often further, since the later 19th century (the term "puffer" derived from the earliest puffers, used on canals, which had no condensers and exhausted steam to the atmosphere as a railway or traction engine does). The first series of VIC craft had a length of 66ft, a 100 ton cargo capacity, a funnel in front of the wheelhouse, a simple 5-tube boiler, engine controls in the wheelhouse and cramped accommodation for 3 or 4 crew. The second series of VICs had a length of 85ft, a cargo capacity of 120 tons, a more efficient Cochrane multi-tube boiler, generous (by contemporary standards) accommodation for 6 crew, including a galley, but lacked the sheer and rounded hull of the earlier type in favour of the hard chines and rectangular form of other wartime craft. There were no engine controls in the wheelhouse, and many have commented on the difficulty of handling the larger type. The VICs were remarkable for the use of steam propulsion at a time when the diesel engine had already become standard for craft of this size. The reason was simply to use existing skills and capacity among steam engine builders at a time when other parts of the war effort placed intense pressure on the diesel engine builders. The ships were mainly built at small yards, nearly all in England (1 was built in Scotland at Kirkintilloch) 40 by Dunstons of Thorne, 25 by Isaac Pimblott of Northwitch, and the rest in small numbers around the country. VIC 56 was one of two built by Pollocks of Faversham. (Four were ordered but two were later cancelled and the half finished hulls became motor barges for the London and Rochester Trading Company.) VICs in use VICs were used in every area of the war where naval supply services were required. Some where shipped (as deck cargo) to overseas bases such as Malta, and 9 of the smaller type, built with diesel engines, were sent to the far east as small tankers. There had been extensive use of puffers in naval supply work in World War 1 and the VICs continued this at all the well known naval bases and particularly in Scotland (Scapa Flow, Rosyth and the Clyde). During the war some VICs were already being operated in the "puffer" trades in western Scotland and after the war many more were sold to the puffer companies for this purpose. Others were sold further afield. The VIC 62 was, until recently, employed in dredging seaweed in the Fal estuary in Cornwall, while others have operated in the coastal trades of Sicily, Norway and Ireland. Present day survivors in Scotland include the "Marsa", now at Bowling, and the "Spartan", now preserved at the Scottish Maritime Museum at Irvine. The other large VIC built at Faversham, VIC 57, became "Arran Monarch" trading to and from the island of that name, before moving to the Bristol Channel to carry coal from South Wales to Watchet and her hull is still in existence in North Devon. All these craft had their steam engines removed and diesels were installed to save fuel costs and reduce the number of crew required. Elsewhere many other VICs remained in Admiralty service, usually among the flotilla of Port Auxiliary Service craft. In southern England a number of VICs could be seen at Deptford Victualling yard on the Thames, and the Royal Dockyards at sheerness, Chatham and Portsmouth. One was attached to HMS Vernon for mine warfare exercises and some, such as VIC 56, were classified as Naval Armament Vessels for the carriage of ammunition. The VIC 27 (since preserved as the "Auld Reekie") was used as a water carrier at Rosyth. By 1878 the need for economy and the decline in the size and shape of the Royal Navy had greatly reduced the Port Auxiliary service fleets and only 2 VICs survived in naval service at Rosyth dockyard. These were the VIC 56 and VIC 65, the latter a water carrier used to supply distilled water to boilers of warships under refit. Among her last duties was to act as a test for the new ship lift designed to allow warships to be lifted on a carriage and then be refitted in sheds on shore. (VIC 65 was subsequently scrapped at Inverkeithing). VIC 56 - History After launching at Faversham in 1945, VIC 56 was sailed north after only a day of trials. Like many of the other VICs she had, when built, and open navigating platform (the wheelhouse was added later by the Admiralty)
Liverpool "Special" Pillar Box [2]
Liverpool "Special" Pillar Box [2]
This is one of the original Liverpool "Special" Posting Boxes - cast in 1863 by Messrs Cochrane and Company of Dudley. THe unique design was authorised and introduced to meet heavy and special posting requirements found in certain parts of the city. It differed from the standard by the inclusion of the lettering "Post Office" below the posting aperture and a large crown on the roof. A mail bag could also be hung inside. After 115 years of continuous use in the Everton district, this posting box was withdrawn from service in September 1978 and preserved as a fine example of early Victorian Street Furniture.

cochrane furniture company
cochrane furniture company
Cochrane: The Real Master and Commander
From the bestselling author of Under the Black Flag, comes the definitive biography of the swashbuckling 19th century maritime hero upon whom Jack Aubrey and Horatio Hornblower are based.

Nicknamed le loup des mers (“the sea wolf”) by Napoleon, Thomas Cochrane was one of the most daring and successful naval heroes of all time. In this fascinating account of Cochrane’s life, David Cordingly, author of the bestselling Under the Black Flag and The Billy Ruffian, unearths startling new details about the real-life “Master and Commander,” from his daring exploits against the French navy to his role in the liberation of Chile, Peru, and Brazil, and the shock exchange scandal that forced him out of England and almost ended his naval career. Drawing on previously unpublished papers, his own travels, wide reading, and the kind of original research that distinguished The Billy Ruffian, Cordingly tells the rip-roaring story of the archetypal Romantic hero who conquered the seas and, in the process, defined his era.

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