AMERICAN APPLIANCES FURNITURE. APPLIANCES FURNITURE

AMERICAN APPLIANCES FURNITURE. OSAGE CREEK LOG FURNITURE

American Appliances Furniture


american appliances furniture
    appliances
  • (appliance) The act of applying; application; An implement, an instrument or apparatus designed (or at least used) as a means to a specific end (often specified); Specifically: A non-manual apparatus or device, powered electrically or by another small motor, used in homes to perform domestic
  • A device or piece of equipment designed to perform a specific task, typically a domestic one
  • An apparatus fitted by a surgeon or a dentist for corrective or therapeutic purpose
  • (appliance) durable goods for home or office use
  • (appliance) a device or control that is very useful for a particular job
  • The action or process of bringing something into operation
    furniture
  • Small accessories or fittings for a particular use or piece of equipment
  • Large movable equipment, such as tables and chairs, used to make a house, office, or other space suitable for living or working
  • A person's habitual attitude, outlook, and way of thinking
  • furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; "they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; "there was only one piece of furniture in the room"
  • Furniture is the mass noun for the movable objects ('mobile' in Latin languages) intended to support various human activities such as seating and sleeping in beds, to hold objects at a convenient height for work using horizontal surfaces above the ground, or to store things.
  • Furniture + 2 is the most recent EP released by American post-hardcore band Fugazi. It was recorded in January and February 2001, the same time that the band was recording their last album, The Argument, and released in October 2001 on 7" and on CD.
    american
  • A native or citizen of the United States
  • The English language as it is used in the United States; American English
  • of or relating to or characteristic of the continents and islands of the Americas; "the American hemisphere"; "American flora and fauna"
  • of or relating to the United States of America or its people or language or culture; "American citizens"; "American English"; "the American dream"
  • A native or inhabitant of any of the countries of North, South, or Central America
  • a native or inhabitant of the United States
american appliances furniture - Star Legacy
Star Legacy Brass Keepsake with Velvet Bag, American Flag
Star Legacy Brass Keepsake with Velvet Bag, American Flag
Star Legacy's American Flag Brass Keepsake is made of solid brass and proudly displays Old Glory waving free. The keepsake is hand-crafted using a sand casting process that is hundreds of years old. Our handcrafting provides each urn with its own unique variation in color, finish and engraving. The theme is patriotic and our Flag is enhanced with a blue/gray granite background symbolizing all parts of America. The Keepsake has a screw top for easy use, and the American Flag Keepsake is ideal for home, scattering, columbarium, or burial. The Keepsake has a companion Large/Adult size, available separately. Made of 100% Brass the Keepsake holds up to 3 cubic inches of cremated remains (one pound weight PRIOR to cremation equals 1 cubic inch. (NOTE: A keepsake only holds a nominal amount of ashes and will NOT hold an entire person's remains.) Dimensions: 2.4 inches high x 1.7 inches in diameter. Due to the personal nature of this product we do not accept returns.

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The Empire of Debt by Dee Hon
The Empire of Debt by Dee Hon
From Adbusters #74, Nov-Dec 2007 The Empire of Debt Money for nothing. Own a home for no money down. Do not pay for your appliances until 2012. This is the new American Dream, and for the last few years, millions have been giddily living it. Dead is the old version, the one historian James Truslow Adams introduced to the world as “that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement.” Such Puritan ideals – to work hard, to save for a better life – didn’t die from the natural causes of age and obsolescence. We killed them, willfully and purposefully, to create a new gilded age. As a society, we told ourselves we could all get rich, put our feet up on the decks of our new vacation homes, and let our money work for us. Earning is for the unenlightened. Equity is the new golden calf. Sadly, this is a hollow dream. Yes, luxury homes have been hitting new gargantuan heights. Ferrari sales have never been better. But much of the ever-expanding wealth is an illusory facade masking a teetering tower of debt – the greatest the world has seen. It will collapse, in a disaster of our own making. Distress is already rumbling through Wall Street. Subprime mortgages leapt into the public consciousness this summer, becoming the catchphrase for the season. Hedge fund masterminds who command salaries in the tens of millions for their supposed financial prescience, but have little oversight or governance, bet their investors’ multi-multi-billions on the ability that subprime borrowers – who by very definition have lower incomes and/or rotten credit histories – would miraculously find means to pay back loans far exceeding what they earn. They didn’t, and surging loan defaults are sending shockwaves through the markets. Yet despite the turmoil this collapse is wreaking, it’s just the first ripple to hit the shore. America’s debt crisis runs deep. How did it come to this? How did America, collectively and as individuals, become a nation addicted to debt, pushed to and over the edge of bankruptcy? The savings rate hangs below zero. Personal bankruptcies are reaching record heights. America’s total debt averages more than $160,000 for every man, woman, and child. On a broader scale, China holds nearly $1 trillion in US debt. Japan and other countries are also owed big. The story begins with labor. The decades following World War II were boom years. Economic growth was strong and powerful industrial unions made the middle-class dream attainable for working-class citizens. Workers bought homes and cars in such volume they gave rise to the modern suburb. But prosperity for wage earners reached its zenith in the early 1970s. By then, corporate America had begun shredding the implicit social contract it had with its workers for fear of increased foreign competition. Companies cut costs by finding cheap labor overseas, creating a drag on wages. In 1972, wages reached their peak. According to the US department of Labor Statistics, workers earned $331 a week, in inflation-adjusted 1982 dollars. Since then, it’s been a downward slide. Today, real wages are nearly one-fifth lower – this, despite real GDP per capita doubling over the same period. Even as wages fell, consumerism was encouraged to continue soaring to unprecedented heights. Buying stuff became a patriotic duty that distinguished citizens from their communist Cold War enemies. In the eighties, consumers’ growing fearlessness towards debt and their hunger for goods were met with Ronald Reagan’s deregulation the lending industry. Credit not only became more easily attainable, it became heavily marketed. Credit card debt, at $880 billion, is now triple what it was in 1988, after adjusting for inflation. Barbecues and TV screens are now the size of small cars. So much the better to fill the average new home, which in 2005 was more than 50 percent larger than the average home in 1973. This is all great news for the corporate sector, which both earns money from loans to consumers, and profits from their spending. Better still, lower wages means lower costs and higher profits. These factors helped the stock market begin a record boom in the early ‘80s that has continued almost unabated until today. These conditions created vast riches for one class of individuals in particular: those who control what is known as economic rent, which can be the income “earned” from the ownership of an asset. Some forms of economic rent include dividends from stocks, or capital gains from the sale of stocks or property. The alchemy of this rent is that it requires no effort to produce money. Governments, for their part, encourage the investors, or rentier class. Economic rent, in the form of capital gains, is taxed at a lower rate than earned income in almost every industrialized country. In the US in particular, capital gains are being taxed at ever-decreasing rates. A person whose job pay
The rich, as Voltaire said, require an abundant supply of poor.
The rich, as Voltaire said, require an abundant supply of poor.
Top photo: Leo Russell Middle photo: Steph Goralnick Bottom photo: Leo Russell From Adbusters #74, Nov-Dec 2007 The Empire of Debt Money for nothing. Own a home for no money down. Do not pay for your appliances until 2012. This is the new American Dream, and for the last few years, millions have been giddily living it. Dead is the old version, the one historian James Truslow Adams introduced to the world as “that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement.” Such Puritan ideals – to work hard, to save for a better life – didn’t die from the natural causes of age and obsolescence. We killed them, willfully and purposefully, to create a new gilded age. As a society, we told ourselves we could all get rich, put our feet up on the decks of our new vacation homes, and let our money work for us. Earning is for the unenlightened. Equity is the new golden calf. Sadly, this is a hollow dream. Yes, luxury homes have been hitting new gargantuan heights. Ferrari sales have never been better. But much of the ever-expanding wealth is an illusory facade masking a teetering tower of debt – the greatest the world has seen. It will collapse, in a disaster of our own making. Distress is already rumbling through Wall Street. Subprime mortgages leapt into the public consciousness this summer, becoming the catchphrase for the season. Hedge fund masterminds who command salaries in the tens of millions for their supposed financial prescience, but have little oversight or governance, bet their investors’ multi-multi-billions on the ability that subprime borrowers – who by very definition have lower incomes and/or rotten credit histories – would miraculously find means to pay back loans far exceeding what they earn. They didn’t, and surging loan defaults are sending shockwaves through the markets. Yet despite the turmoil this collapse is wreaking, it’s just the first ripple to hit the shore. America’s debt crisis runs deep. How did it come to this? How did America, collectively and as individuals, become a nation addicted to debt, pushed to and over the edge of bankruptcy? The savings rate hangs below zero. Personal bankruptcies are reaching record heights. America’s total debt averages more than $160,000 for every man, woman, and child. On a broader scale, China holds nearly $1 trillion in US debt. Japan and other countries are also owed big. The story begins with labor. The decades following World War II were boom years. Economic growth was strong and powerful industrial unions made the middle-class dream attainable for working-class citizens. Workers bought homes and cars in such volume they gave rise to the modern suburb. But prosperity for wage earners reached its zenith in the early 1970s. By then, corporate America had begun shredding the implicit social contract it had with its workers for fear of increased foreign competition. Companies cut costs by finding cheap labor overseas, creating a drag on wages. In 1972, wages reached their peak. According to the US department of Labor Statistics, workers earned $331 a week, in inflation-adjusted 1982 dollars. Since then, it’s been a downward slide. Today, real wages are nearly one-fifth lower – this, despite real GDP per capita doubling over the same period. Even as wages fell, consumerism was encouraged to continue soaring to unprecedented heights. Buying stuff became a patriotic duty that distinguished citizens from their communist Cold War enemies. In the eighties, consumers’ growing fearlessness towards debt and their hunger for goods were met with Ronald Reagan’s deregulation the lending industry. Credit not only became more easily attainable, it became heavily marketed. Credit card debt, at $880 billion, is now triple what it was in 1988, after adjusting for inflation. Barbecues and TV screens are now the size of small cars. So much the better to fill the average new home, which in 2005 was more than 50 percent larger than the average home in 1973. This is all great news for the corporate sector, which both earns money from loans to consumers, and profits from their spending. Better still, lower wages means lower costs and higher profits. These factors helped the stock market begin a record boom in the early ‘80s that has continued almost unabated until today. These conditions created vast riches for one class of individuals in particular: those who control what is known as economic rent, which can be the income “earned” from the ownership of an asset. Some forms of economic rent include dividends from stocks, or capital gains from the sale of stocks or property. The alchemy of this rent is that it requires no effort to produce money. Governments, for their part, encourage the investors, or rentier class. Economic rent, in the form of capital gains, is taxed at a lower rate than earned income in almost every industrialized country. In the US in particular

american appliances furniture
american appliances furniture
Belwith American Diner P2146-CH Chrome Appliance Pull
The American Diner Collection by Hickory Hardware features many types of knobs, hook, and appliance pulls. This collection offers the best quality, styles and finishes such as stainless steel, black nickel, satin nickel. If you're looking for something wild and crazy, this collection is the right choice. This collection will add extra flair for your kitchen or bathroom.The American Diner Collection by Hickory Hardware features many types of knobs, hook, and appliance pulls. This collection offers the best quality, styles and finishes such as stainless steel, black nickel, satin nickel. If you're looking for something wild and crazy, this collection is the right choice. This collection will add extra flair for your kitchen or bathroom.