HOTEL ROOM BIDDING : HOTEL ROOM

Hotel room bidding : Americana inn new york : Point break hotel

Hotel Room Bidding


hotel room bidding
    hotel room
  • A hotel is an establishment that provides paid lodging on a short-term basis. The provision of basic accommodation, in times past, consisting only of a room with a bed, a cupboard, a small table and a washstand has largely been replaced by rooms with modern facilities, including en-suite
  • Hotel Room is a three episode 1993 HBO television series produced by David Lynch (who directed two of them). Each drama takes place in the same New York City hotel room (number 603 of the Railroad Hotel) at different times (1969, 1992, and 1936, respectively).
  • a bedroom (usually with bath) in a hotel
    bidding
  • The offering of particular prices for something, esp. at an auction
  • command: an authoritative direction or instruction to do something
  • (in bridge and whist) The action of stating before play how many tricks one intends to make
  • a request to be present; "they came at his bidding"
  • bid: (bridge) the number of tricks a bridge player is willing to contract to make
  • The offers made in such a situation
hotel room bidding - 101 Hotel
101 Hotel Rooms
101 Hotel Rooms
As our lives accelerate to keep pace with today's frantic world, the possibility of truly arriving at a destination grows in importance. Hotel rooms represent one such destination where the boundary between journey and arrival, movement and stillness is most tangible. Interior designers are faced with the challenge of creating rooms that allow an authentic stillness in the most inherently transient of interior spaces. 101 Hotel Rooms presents 101 different design concepts by Corinna Kretschmar-Joehnk and Peter Joehnk, two specialists in the field of hospitality design. The projects are organised by means of categories such as resort, urban and beach hotels and each is presented by means of plans and drawings as well as an explanatory text that reveals the concept behind each design. What makes this title especially valuable is the direct insight into the planning process of two professional and highly successful interior designers.

78% (13)
Plaza Hotel, New York City
Plaza Hotel, New York City
The Plaza, A Fairmont Managed Hotel Fifth Avenue at Central Park South, New York, NY 10019 Flags flying at entrance to the Fairmont Plaza Hotel -------------------------- The Plaza Hotel in New York City is jointly owned by Elad Properties and Kingdom Holdings, a Saudia Arabia based corporation. It derives its name from the Grand Army Plaza which sits in front of the hotel. It has been managed by Fairmont Hotels & Resorts since 1999. History of the Plaza from the Fairmont Plaza web site: The Plaza opened its doors on October 1, 1907, amid a flurry of impressive reports describing it as the greatest hotel in the world. Located at Fifth Avenue and Central Park South, this luxury hotel was constructed in the most fashionable residential section of New York City. The Plaza was the dream of financier Bernhard Beinecke, hotelier Fred Sterry, and Harry S. Black, President of the Fuller Construction Company. The Fuller Company also built the Pennsylvania Station, the Flatiron Building, R.H. Macy's flagship store on Broadway and 34th Street, the Savoy-Plaza Hotel across Fifth Avenue, the biggest hotel in the world at the time, designed by McKim, Mead & White, and demolished in 1964. In Chicago, Fuller built the Stevens Hotel, designed by Holabird & Roche. They purchased a 15-year-old hotel of the same name on the site. The three men set out to replace it with what is surely one of the most elegant hotels in the world. Construction of the 19-story building (a skyscraper back then) took two years at a cost of $12 million - an unprecedented sum in those days. The architect was Henry Janeway Hardenbergh. Hardenbergh also designed the Dakota apartments, the Willard Hotel in Washington, D.C. and The Fairmont Copley Plaza Boston, set about his task to provide all the pomp, glory, and opulence of a French chateau. No cost was spared. The largest single order in history for gold-encrusted china was placed with L. Straus & Sons, and no less than 1,650 crystal chandeliers were purchased. Originally, The Plaza, a Manhattan luxury hotel, served as a residence for wealthy New Yorkers. Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt were the first to sign the register. For guests who chose to rent on a nightly basis at the time, this New York City luxury hotel's single rooms started at $2.50 per night. Kings, presidents, ambassadors, stars of stage, screen and sports, as well as business executives and travellers from all parts of the world have gathered and stayed at The Plaza. The Plaza was so well known that Ernest Hemingway once advised F. Scott Fitzgerald to give his liver to Princeton and his heart to The Plaza. Although The Plaza appeared fleetingly in earlier films, this Manhattan luxury hotel's true movie debut was in Alfred Hitchcock's 1959 classic North by Northwest - the first time a crew, director and cast assembled on site to make a picture. Before then, movies were shot almost entirely on Hollywood soundstages and rarely on location. The Plaza has provided the location for other motion pictures such as Plaza Suite, The Way We Were, The Great Gatsby, Barefoot in the Park, Funny Girl, Cotton Club, Crocodile Dundee I and II and Home Alone II: Lost In New-York. Designated a New York City Landmark in 1969, The Plaza is listed on the Register of Historic Places and the only New York City hotel to be designated as a National Historic Landmark. According to Wikipedia Conrad Hilton bought the Plaza for US$7.4 million in 1943 ($94 million in today's dollars) and spent US$6.0 million ($76.2 million in today's dollars) refurbishing it. The Childs Company, a national restaurant chain which partnered in the development of the neighboring Savoy-Plaza Hotel,(now the site of the General Motors Building), purchased the Plaza Hotel in 1955 for 1,100,000 shares of Childs common stock, valued at approximately $6,325,000 ($51.9 million in today's dollars). Childs subsequently changed its name to Hotel Corporation of America, now known as Sonesta International Hotels Corporation. Donald Trump bought the Plaza for $407.5 million in 1988 ($756 million in today's dollars). Trump commented on his purchase in a full-page open letter he published in The New York Times: "I haven't purchased a building, I have purchased a masterpiece — the Mona Lisa. For the first time in my life, I have knowingly made a deal that was not economic — for I can never justify the price I paid, no matter how successful the Plaza becomes." After Trump's divorce from wife Ivana Trump, the Plaza's president, Trump sold the hotel for $325 million in 1995 ($468 million in today's dollars) to Troy Richard Campbell, from New Hampshire. He sold it in 2004 for $675 million ($785 million in today's dollars) to a Manhattan developer, El Ad Properties. El Ad bought the hotel with plans of adding residential and commercial sections. Since The Plaza Hotel is a New York landmark, Tishman Construction Corporation, the construction management comp
Plaza Hotel, New York City
Plaza Hotel, New York City
The Plaza, A Fairmont Managed Hotel Fifth Avenue at Central Park South, New York, NY 10019 The Fairmont Plaza Hotel appears as a French chateaux. -------------------------------- The Plaza Hotel in New York City is jointly owned by Elad Properties and Kingdom Holdings, a Saudia Arabia based corporation. It derives its name from the Grand Army Plaza which sits in front of the hotel. It has been managed by Fairmont Hotels & Resorts since 1999. History of the Plaza from the Fairmont Plaza web site: The Plaza opened its doors on October 1, 1907, amid a flurry of impressive reports describing it as the greatest hotel in the world. Located at Fifth Avenue and Central Park South, this luxury hotel was constructed in the most fashionable residential section of New York City. The Plaza was the dream of financier Bernhard Beinecke, hotelier Fred Sterry, and Harry S. Black, President of the Fuller Construction Company. The Fuller Company also built the Pennsylvania Station, the Flatiron Building, R.H. Macy's flagship store on Broadway and 34th Street, the Savoy-Plaza Hotel across Fifth Avenue, the biggest hotel in the world at the time, designed by McKim, Mead & White, and demolished in 1964. In Chicago, Fuller built the Stevens Hotel, designed by Holabird & Roche. They purchased a 15-year-old hotel of the same name on the site. The three men set out to replace it with what is surely one of the most elegant hotels in the world. Construction of the 19-story building (a skyscraper back then) took two years at a cost of $12 million - an unprecedented sum in those days. The architect was Henry Janeway Hardenbergh. Hardenbergh also designed the Dakota apartments, the Willard Hotel in Washington, D.C. and The Fairmont Copley Plaza Boston, set about his task to provide all the pomp, glory, and opulence of a French chateau. No cost was spared. The largest single order in history for gold-encrusted china was placed with L. Straus & Sons, and no less than 1,650 crystal chandeliers were purchased. Originally, The Plaza, a Manhattan luxury hotel, served as a residence for wealthy New Yorkers. Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt were the first to sign the register. For guests who chose to rent on a nightly basis at the time, this New York City luxury hotel's single rooms started at $2.50 per night. Kings, presidents, ambassadors, stars of stage, screen and sports, as well as business executives and travellers from all parts of the world have gathered and stayed at The Plaza. The Plaza was so well known that Ernest Hemingway once advised F. Scott Fitzgerald to give his liver to Princeton and his heart to The Plaza. Although The Plaza appeared fleetingly in earlier films, this Manhattan luxury hotel's true movie debut was in Alfred Hitchcock's 1959 classic North by Northwest - the first time a crew, director and cast assembled on site to make a picture. Before then, movies were shot almost entirely on Hollywood soundstages and rarely on location. The Plaza has provided the location for other motion pictures such as Plaza Suite, The Way We Were, The Great Gatsby, Barefoot in the Park, Funny Girl, Cotton Club, Crocodile Dundee I and II and Home Alone II: Lost In New-York. Designated a New York City Landmark in 1969, The Plaza is listed on the Register of Historic Places and the only New York City hotel to be designated as a National Historic Landmark. According to Wikipedia Conrad Hilton bought the Plaza for US$7.4 million in 1943 ($94 million in today's dollars) and spent US$6.0 million ($76.2 million in today's dollars) refurbishing it. The Childs Company, a national restaurant chain which partnered in the development of the neighboring Savoy-Plaza Hotel,(now the site of the General Motors Building), purchased the Plaza Hotel in 1955 for 1,100,000 shares of Childs common stock, valued at approximately $6,325,000 ($51.9 million in today's dollars). Childs subsequently changed its name to Hotel Corporation of America, now known as Sonesta International Hotels Corporation. Donald Trump bought the Plaza for $407.5 million in 1988 ($756 million in today's dollars). Trump commented on his purchase in a full-page open letter he published in The New York Times: "I haven't purchased a building, I have purchased a masterpiece — the Mona Lisa. For the first time in my life, I have knowingly made a deal that was not economic — for I can never justify the price I paid, no matter how successful the Plaza becomes." After Trump's divorce from wife Ivana Trump, the Plaza's president, Trump sold the hotel for $325 million in 1995 ($468 million in today's dollars) to Troy Richard Campbell, from New Hampshire. He sold it in 2004 for $675 million ($785 million in today's dollars) to a Manhattan developer, El Ad Properties. El Ad bought the hotel with plans of adding residential and commercial sections. Since The Plaza Hotel is a New York landmark, Tishman Construction Corporation, the construction managem

hotel room bidding
hotel room bidding
Parisian Hideaways: Exquisite Rooms in Enchanting Hotels
From the author of French Country Hideaways comes an enticing new insider’s entree to Paris. Eschewing the larger hotels and chains, Casey O’Brien Blondes has put together an impeccable list of four-star escapes carefully selected for their interior design, authenticity, panache, and personalized service. Grouped by theme—including literary, historic, and boudoir—the hotels present an enticing range of decor, from the timeless splendor of the Raphael, with its incomparable view of the Arch de Triomphe from its lush rooftop garden restaurant, to the minimalist verve of Hotel le A, off the Faubourg Saint-Honore, where graphic black-and-white decor harmonize with Gallic elan. Each is unique, yet all share in common family or manager ownership, fewer than 100 rooms, generous room size, and very distinctive French style. With lush color photography and in-depth descriptions of each hotel, including a list of neighborhood restaurants, boutiques, gourmet treats, curiosities, or walking tours, Parisian Hideaways is a must for anyone longing to escape to or be inspired by the City of Lights.

Comments