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Central Hotel Vienna


central hotel vienna
    central hotel
  • The Central Hotel is a large hotel in the centre of Glasgow, Scotland.
    vienna
  • the capital and largest city of Austria; located on the Danube in northeastern Austria; was the home of Beethoven and Brahms and Haydn and Mozart and Schubert and Strauss
  • The capital of Austria, in the northeastern part of the country on the Danube River; pop. 1,533,000. From 1278 to 1918 it was the seat of the Habsburgs and has long been a center of the arts, esp. music. Mozart, Beethoven, and the Strauss family were among the composers who lived and worked there
  • (viennese) of or relating to or characteristic of Vienna or its inhabitants
  • Vienna is the fourth studio LP by the synthpop band Ultravox, first released on 11 July 1980. The album peaked at #3 in the UK charts and was the first Ultravox release to enter the UK top ten. It was certified Platinum in the United Kingdom in July 1981 for 300,000 copies sold.
central hotel vienna - best designed
best designed wellness hotels Western and Central Europe, Alps, and Mediterranean
best designed wellness hotels Western and Central Europe, Alps, and Mediterranean
Whether it is the small five-room house or the renowned grand hotel, the overall criteria for this top selection is the recognizable philosophy of consistency in architecture and design where love of detail is balanced with exquisite service. In this context wellness does not only mean a sauna, steam bath or massage, it means more: a feeling of comfort and inspiration everywhere.
This new journey transports the reader from the high northern landscapes of Iceland, through Scandinavia, Germany, the Benelux countries, the United Kingdom, France, Italy, Greece, Cyprus and Turkey to Spain and finally Portugal.

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St. Regis Hotel
St. Regis Hotel
Midtown Manhattan The St. Regis Hotel is one of the most elegant and sophisticated Beaux-Arts style buildings in New York. Among the oldest of the early "skyscraper" hotels, it rises nineteen stories above the intersection of Fifth Avenue and East 55th Street. Begun in 1901, it was designed as the city's most luxurious hotel by the firm of Trowbridge & Livingston. The St. Regis was commissioned by John Jacob Astor whose family had built the city's first luxury hotel, the Astor House of 1836. The St. Regis is still one of the most important buildings on Fifth Avenue, contributing to the avenue's fashionable character, reminding us all of its extraordinarily rich past. History The development of the luxury hotel in New York began when John Jacob Astor (1763-1848) commissioned architect Isaiah Rogers to design a hotel to be erected on the site of his former house on fashionable lower Broadway opposite City Hall Park. When completed in 1836, the restrained Greek Revival facade of the Astor House masked as interior that provided unequalled services and appointments. The hotel was an instant success with both visitors and city residents, setting a standard to be met or surpassed by all future hotels seeking to attract wealthy travelers and businessmen. The Astor House maintained its position as New York's finest hotel for over fifteen years until the city experienced a period of unprecedented economic and physical growth. The boundaries of the city expanded northward and the fashionable center moved "uptown" to Broadway between Canal and Houston Streets. A host of hotels were erected, prompted in part by the Crystal Palace exhibition of 1853, with the finest and most lavish rising along this section of Broadway. Prominent among them were the St, Nicholas at Spring Street and its neighbor across Broadway, the Metropolitan, which had incorporated in its structure the garden of the old and famous Niblo's Gardens. These hotels not only lived up to the standards set by the Astor House, but even exceeded them, vying to outdo each other in opulence. After the Civil War and the recovery of the economy from the general economic depression that followed, the relentless northward growth of the city resumed, and a number of grand hotels opened near Madison Square along Fifth Avenue and Broadway. Two—the Gilsey House and the Grand (both designated New York City Landmarks)—still stand on Broadway. John Jacob Astor (1864-1912) and his cousin William Waldorf Astor again exerted their family's influence as arbiters of taste and fashion in both the worlds of high society and real estate by constructing the hotel Waldorf Astoria in 1892 and 1897 on the site of two neighboring family mansions on Fifth Avenue between 33rd and 34th Streets, now the site of the Empire State Building. In 1892, William Waldorf Astor also commissioned the New Nether land Hotel at Fifth Avenue and 59 th Street. These hotels heralded the transformation of Fifth Avenue from an exclusive residential street—Millionaires' Row—to a fashionable commercial thoroughfare. Moreover, they were the first of the hotels to combine two separate building types: the skyscraper, previously restricted to the downtown area and to office use; and the hotel, which had generally been low-scaled and essentially domestic in character. A decade after these hotels opened, the city once again underwent a substantial change. Major civic improvements, particularly in rapid transit, transformed the character and pattern of movement of the city's residents. The first subways were being built, three East River bridges were either in the planning stages or under construction, as were the two great railroad stations, Pennsylvania Station and Grand Central Terminal. The theater district had moved uptown to Broadway and Times Square, and Fifth Avenue had become "what Regent and Bond Streets are to London, the Rue de la Paix to Paris, the Unter den Linden to Berlin, the Ringstrasse to Vienna..." Distinct hotel districts developed. The areas immediately around the railway stations attracted hotels catering to transient businessmen. On Broadway and the adjacent mid-town side streets hotels for tourists sprang up. The Fifth Avenue hotels were built for the well-to-do in New York for the winter social season or on extended business. The Waldorf Astoria, which remained the premier luxury hotel was, however, becoming dated: ...the combination of being fashionable with being so enormous leads to a queer mixture of people at times, and gives an excuse for the gibe that the WaJLdorf 'provides exclusiveness for the masses.' A new kind of luxury hotel, providing a more exclusive and refined environment, was in demand. The St. Regis was specifically designed to fill this new demand: Literally no expense has been spared to make the hotel (the St. Regis) as safe, as convient and as luxurious as the most expensive private house in the city. It establishe
Apartment - Derag City Apartments, Vienna, Austria
Apartment - Derag City Apartments, Vienna, Austria
The apartments are homely and comfortably furnished with a fully fitted kitchen, all of them have double beds, a desk, living, kitchen and dining areas as well as state-of-the-art technology, such as free internet via LAN.

central hotel vienna
central hotel vienna
The Lady Matador's Hotel: A Novel
National Book Award finalist Cristina Garcia delivers a powerful and gorgeous novel about the intertwining lives of the denizens of a luxurious hotel in an unnamed Central American capital in the midst of political turmoil. The lives of six men and women converge over the course of one week. There is a Japanese-Mexican-American matadora in town for a bull-fighting competition; an ex-guerrilla now working as a waitress in the hotel coffee shop; a Korean manufacturer with an underage mistress ensconced in the honeymoon suite; aninternational adoption lawyer of German descent; a colonel who committed atrocities during his country’s long civil war; and a Cuban poet who has come with his American wife to adopt a local infant. With each day, their lives become further entangled, resulting in the unexpected—the clash of histories and the pull of revenge and desire.Cristina Garcia’s magnificent orchestration of politics, the intimacies of daily life, and the frailty of human nature unfolds in a moving, ambitious, often comic, and unforgettable tale.

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