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Free Tenor Sax Solos


free tenor sax solos
    tenor
  • A singer with such a voice
  • (of a musical instrument) intermediate between alto and baritone or bass; "a tenor sax"
  • A part written for such a voice
  • the adult male singing voice above baritone
  • A singing voice between baritone and alto or countertenor, the highest of the ordinary adult male range
  • the pitch range of the highest male voice
    solos
  • An unaccompanied flight by a pilot in an aircraft
  • (solo) composed or performed by a single voice or instrument; "a passage for solo clarinet"
  • A piece of vocal or instrumental music or a dance, or a part or passage in one, for one performer
  • (solo) alone: without anybody else or anything else; "the child stayed home alone"; "the pillar stood alone, supporting nothing"; "he flew solo"
  • A thing done by one person unaccompanied, in particular
  • (solo) any activity that is performed alone without assistance
    free
  • With the sheets eased
  • able to act at will; not hampered; not under compulsion or restraint; "free enterprise"; "a free port"; "a free country"; "I have an hour free"; "free will"; "free of racism"; "feel free to stay as long as you wish"; "a free choice"
  • grant freedom to; free from confinement
  • loose: without restraint; "cows in India are running loose"
  • Without cost or payment
    sax
  • A saxophone
  • SAX (abbr. from Slovensky akciovy index; in Slovak: Slovak Share Index) is the official stock index of the Bratislava Stock Exchange.
  • a Belgian maker of musical instruments who invented the saxophone (1814-1894)
  • a single-reed woodwind with a conical bore
free tenor sax solos - Lanikai LU-21T
Lanikai LU-21T Tenor Ukulele
Lanikai LU-21T Tenor Ukulele
The Lu-21T is the best selling Tenor Ukulele offered by Lanikai. With the attention to detail and easy playability it is easy to see why. This handcrafted ukulele is made with Nato wood (otherwise known as Eastern Mahogany) on its top back and sides. When this wood choice is paired with the Rosewood fingerboard it brings out a mellow tone with an enhanced midrange that is often missing in instruments in this price point. The LU-21T also comes stocked with die cast tuning machines geared 14/1 for easy tuning. If you have never played ukulele before get ready for a world of fun. The ukulele is an addicting instrument that can and will be taken everywhere. The standard tuning on a Soprano, Concert, and Tenor ukulele is GBEA, and on a Baritone DGBE. If you can play one ukulele you can play them all! With the easy playability, and included instruction booklet written by Mary Lou Dempler you will be playing in a matter of minutes then you’ll see why people are saying Lanikai Makes Me Happy! For more information about this model or Lanikai please visit www.Lanikaiukes.com

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Rahsaan Roland Kirk (1935-1977) by Photographer Unknown to Me
Rahsaan Roland Kirk (1935-1977) by Photographer Unknown to Me
Rahsaan Roland Kirk (August 7, 1935 – December 5, 1977) was an American jazz multi-instrumentalist who played tenor saxophone, flute and many other instruments. He was renowned for his onstage vitality, during which virtuoso improvisation was accompanied by comic banter, political ranting, and the ability to play several instruments simultaneously. Kirk was born Ronald Theodore Kirk in Columbus, Ohio, but felt compelled by a dream to transpose two letters in his first name to make Roland. He became blind at an early age as a result of poor medical treatment. In 1970, Kirk added "Rahsaan" to his name after hearing it in a dream. Preferring to lead his own bands, Kirk rarely performed as a sideman, although he did record with arranger Quincy Jones and drummer Roy Haynes and had notable stints with bassist Charles Mingus. One of his best-known recorded performances is the lead flute and solo on Jones' "Soul Bossa Nova", a 1964 hit song repopularized in the Austin Powers films (Jones 1964; McLeod et al. 1997). His playing was generally rooted in soul jazz or hard bop, but Kirk's knowledge of jazz history allowed him to draw on many elements of the music's past, from ragtime to swing and free jazz. Kirk also absorbed classical influences, and his artistry reflected elements of pop music by composers such as Smokey Robinson and Burt Bacharach, as well as Duke Ellington, John Coltrane and other jazz musicians. The live album Bright Moments (1973) is an example of one of his shows. His main instrument was the tenor saxophone, supplemented by other saxes, and contrasted with the lighter sound of the flute. At times he would play a number of these horns at once, harmonizing with himself, or sustain a note for lengthy durations by using circular breathing, or play the flute through his nose. A number of his instruments were exotic or homemade, but even while playing two or three saxophones at once, the music was intricate, powerful jazz with a strong feel for the blues. Kirk was politically outspoken. During his concerts, between songs he often talked about topical issues, including black history and the civil rights movement. His monologues were often laced with satire and absurdist humor. In 1975, Kirk suffered a major stroke which led to partial paralysis of one side of his body. However, he continued to perform and record, modifying his instruments to enable him to play with one arm. At a live performance at Ronnie Scott's club in London he even managed to play two instruments, and carried on to tour internationally and even appear on television. He died from a second stroke in 1977 after performing in the Frangipani Room of the Indiana University Student Union in Bloomington, Indiana.
sonny rollins
sonny rollins
Prestige label 1956 Review by Michael G. Nastos At a time when he was a member of the legendary Clifford Brown/Max Roach sextet, Sonny Rollins was still the apple fallen not too far from the tree of Miles Davis. Tenor Madness was the recording that, once and for all, established Newk as one of the premier tenor saxophonists, an accolade that in retrospect, has continued through six full decades and gives an indication why a young Rollins was so well liked, as his fluency, whimsical nature, and solid construct of melodies and solos gave him the title of the next Coleman Hawkins or Lester Young of mainstream jazz. With the team of pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones, staples of that era's Miles Davis combos, Rollins has all the rhythmic ammunition to cut loose, be free, and extrapolate on themes as only he could, and still can. This is most evident on his version of "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World," started in its normal choppy waltz time, followed by a sax/drums prelude, a drum solo from Jones, and steamed from there on in, a hot 4/4 romp. Garland is particularly outstanding for keeping up the pace, depth and placement on this one. A bluesy version of "When Your Lover Has Gone," again enlivened by Jones, and the legendary title track with Rollins and John Coltrane trading long solos, and fours with Jones, are tunes that in the mid-'50s defined the parlance "blowing session." "Paul's Pal," in tribute to Chambers, has become a standard in its own right with a bright, memorable melody showing the good humor of Rollins, especially on the second time through, while the saxophonist's ability to sing vocal like tones through his horn is no better evinced as during the light ballad "My Reverie." A recording that should stand proudly alongside Saxophone Colossus as some of the best work of Sonny Rollins in his early years, it's also a testament to the validity, vibrancy, and depth of modern jazz in the post-World War era. It belongs on everybody's shelf.

free tenor sax solos
free tenor sax solos
The Maltese Tenor
JOSEPH CALLEJA - THE MALTESE TENOR It was summer 2010, and Joseph Calleja was making his role debut as Gabriele Adorno in Verdi's Simon Boccanegra. The house was Covent Garden in London, and his co-stars included a certain Placido Domingo, now singing the baritone title-role. Joseph Calleja had planned to study the challenging role of Adorno during the previous summer, but had lost that time preparing for another new role, Offenbach's Hoffmann, which he had taken on at the Metropolitan Opera in New York after another tenor withdrew. "So, contrary to all my principles, I studied Adorno for just two weeks before I came to London", Joseph Calleja explains, laughing. "I had no other time. But the voice was telling me it was ready for new things. And the minute I started on the piece, it just fitted into the voice as if I had been singing it for ten years. It was really one of those instances when it all just works." The critics enthusiastically agreed: plaudits for Joseph Calleja not only matched those for Placido Domingo himself, but in some cases even came close to exceeding them. It's a story that doesn't just attest Joseph Calleja's increasing prominence on the world operatic stage, but also his development as a dramatic artist. It's now five years since the Maltese singer recorded his last recital album, The Golden Voice (a follow-up to 2004's Tenor Arias) - a long time to be away from the studio. "Back then I was an extremely young artist to be recording CDs at all", he replies. "Of course I enjoyed the success, but I also had a long way to go. What's changed is that I'm much more in control of my vocal facility and I have a maturity which only time on stage can bring to one's art. If you know the role inside out, then you can find the right nuances and inflection much more easily." So one way into The Maltese Tenor is through the roles that Joseph Calleja now knows from the immediacy of live performance. There is, of course, Adorno's aria "Sento avvampar nell'anima", a late addition to the album, but one that Joseph Calleja felt was indispensable after his London triumph. It is still rarely performed outside of complete performances of the opera. "But any self-respecting tenor with a good voice should make it a show-stopper, because it's so beautifully written." Hoffmann is here too, as part of a quartet of French heroes that also includes Massenet's des Grieux (from Manon), Gounod's Faust and, in a languorous duet with another Decca artist, the Polish soprano Aleksandra Kurzak, the lovesick fisherman Nadir in Bizet's Les Pecheurs de perles. "The next four to five years are ideal for me to explore these full lyric French roles", Joseph Calleja explains. "There are so many opinions about what the `French style' really is. The consensus is that the French line gives you less room to manoeuvre, to do your own thing as a singer. But the way I see it is through the Italian bel canto style. It's what I try to do with Hoffmann, particularly in the middle of his chanson, which is more lyrical." In the celebrated "Salut, demeure chaste et pure!" from Faust, meanwhile - a role Joseph Calleja has sung in Berlin and would love to reprise - the challenge is to give fresh spontaneity to one of opera's hit numbers. "This aria is sung so much in concert that one tends to forget about what's in the text, what the aria means in context." The Pearl Fishers duet, too, followed live concert performances in Frankfurt. "At the end of the evening there was a thirty-minute standing ovation . . . so I thought I had to include that duet on the album." A stronger dramatic take on these arias hasn't diluted Joseph Calleja's fidelity to that bel canto style. It's one reason why his voice has often been described as "old-fashioned": grace and elegance matched to a timbre that's lighter than that of many other tenors of Joseph Calleja's generation and flecked by a rapid, persistent vibrato. Early on in Joseph Calleja's career, some found that intrusive. "For a period of time, my vibrato was very, very fast", Joseph Calleja concedes. "But people fail to mention or think about how old I was at the time. If you listen to very early recordings of Jussi Bjorling, Enrico Caruso or Giuseppe di Stefano, they all have it. Eventually it settles down and matures." Joseph Calleja grew up soaked in the golden voices of the twentieth century and won't be lectured on what they did or didn't do to keep their voices in peak condition: listening to their recordings was a cornerstone of his studies in Malta with his childhood mentor, the tenor-turned-teacher Paul Asciak. "He sang concerts with Tito Schipa, he was friends with Franco Corelli . . . what he gave me is really the way they used to do things back then, based on listening to the old recordings. Some people say that when they're preparing a new role they don't listen to anybody else. I can understand that, but I don't accept it! If you don't listen to what your predecessors did before you, it's like being a leaf on a tree and not knowing which tree you're on." The old masters will be Joseph Calleja's guide as he tackles the bigger, meatier Italian repertoire, too. It's a new direction in The Maltese Tenor: not just Puccini's La boheme, but Tosca and Manon Lescaut, too; Verdi, aside from Boccanegra, is represented by the more spinto (literally: pushed) operas Un ballo in maschera and Luisa Miller. Some would call Boito's version of the Faust story, Mefistofele, from which Joseph Calleja sings the winsome "Dai campi, dai prati" and "Giunto sul passo estremo", another step up altogether on the ladder to the big dramatic repertoire. "The voice should tell the singer by itself when it's time to move on from La boheme or Lucia di Lammermoor to this repertoire", Joseph Calleja observes. "Mefistofele and Un ballo in maschera in particular are both beautifully written, they're all on the breath and the approach is still bel canto. Just because it's Verdi doesn't mean you have to shout your way through it." You could call this the wisdom of the more mature Maltese tenor. Or, if you're Joseph Calleja, you might simply call it gut instinct. "I'm sorry I haven't anything more intellectual to offer you", he laughs, by way of apology. "But I just want to sing as beautifully as possible - without losing my commitment to the work." Neil Fisher

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