WHOLE FOODS FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY COOKBOOK : WHOLE FOODS FOR THE

WHOLE FOODS FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY COOKBOOK : SECRET RECIPE COOKBOOK

Whole Foods For The Whole Family Cookbook


whole foods for the whole family cookbook
    family cookbook
  • (Family cookbooks) Family cookbooks are collections of recipes, that may or may not be a generation or more old, sometimes including family history and photos of the family members.
    whole foods
  • Whole foods are foods that are unprocessed and unrefined, or processed and refined as little as possible before being consumed. Whole foods typically do not contain added ingredients, such as sugar, salt, or fat.
  • Foods that are not altered, chemically treated or irradiated. These foods include beans, grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds. By eating whole foods, we sustain a healthy life-style.
  • Preppy grocery store, specializes in organic foods
whole foods for the whole family cookbook - The Whole
The Whole Family Cookbook: Celebrate the goodness of locally grown foods
The Whole Family Cookbook: Celebrate the goodness of locally grown foods
There's no better way to teach your children to eat fresh, healthy, organic food than with recipes you can cook and eat together! Written by the founder of San Francisco's premier children's cooking school and award-winning, green-parenting blogger Michelle Stern, this cookbook gives your family the resources you need to cook delicious, local food in any season, including:
Practical advice like how to pick the best of local and natural food without spending too much time or money.
Color-coded instructions that guide kids of all ages through age-appropriate steps in every recipe.
More than 75 organic, family-friendly recipes and beautiful 4-color photos that will get everyone excited about what's for dinner!
Whether you're cooking Summertime Kabobs on a balmy June evening or Sweet and Savory Turnovers for a toasty winter breakfast, your family will learn to love the wholesome food--and priceless memories--you can make together.

88% (19)
Apocalypse Chow Pantry
Apocalypse Chow Pantry
Yuppie emergency food prep. The authors of Apocalypse Chow, a husband wife team, one of whom writes gourmet cookbooks and the other domestic spiritual lifestyle books, have combined skills and with their experience weathering Florida hurricanes, put together a book on emergency prep that is a real find. Since most people have not acquired the long haul skills of canning their own home-grown produce or cooking dried beans in a solar oven, this book most replicates the resources of your average urban household. The premise here is that, in a prolonged power outage, you will have no refrigeration and must conserve fuel by cooking one pot meals on a portable gas stove. This means small packages of food that will be eaten once open so no leftovers and food that doesn't take a lot of time=fuel to cook. Half the book is recipes—all of them vegetarian because meat spoils. The other half is sound advice on how to prepare and live through the usual disasters from a culinary perspective. Thus is born Pantry Cuisine. The difference between merely surviving and really living. And since there will be lots of time to fill when the power is out why not spend it in food prep? I like the tone of the book. It is reassuring but insistent in a quiet way, giving many good reasons why you should acquire these skills. With anecdotes from the authors' real life hurricane experience and tidbits of disaster prep lore from government sources, it is also a fun read. The list of possible disasters includes nuclear war and the actual biblical apocalypse with reasons why you would still want your haute cuisine. This is a sound approach to take because people seem to hope that things will be so bad it will be pointless to prepare. (Much like the college students who don't want to finish school because the world is going to end in 2012 so what's the point.) Interestingly enough he also includes the detail of increased solar flares knocking out power grids. This, he points out, will only increase because the magnetic poles are shifting and that has lowered the electromagnetic field. (I've come to the conclusion that the entire future will be disaster ridden so we might as well get used to it, because we will still be expected to carry on, go to work and put food on the table.) The book provides a five day menu and shopping list plus lists of kitchen supplies to augment the manual can opener on everyone else's list. He calls this approach the five-day wine box. There is also a list for a "well-tempered" pantry; items your basic home chef would want to have on hand anyway. Since some items on both these lists I didn't feel inclined to serve and some I had never heard of, I took the route of going through all the recipes and picking out the ones I could imagine serving to a fairly fussy foodie family. Then I went off in search of the canned vegetables at places considerably cheaper than our usual Whole Foods. I was astonished to discover that you can get organic items at the Bargain Grocery Outlet. Canned potatoes are not found at our high end places, nor would we think to buy them. Nor would we eat canned green beans or carrots, but for the sake of the prep I found what I could in low sodium or no salt varieties. For $75, the same as what I spent for emergency back-up dog food, I have ingredients for 12 dinners (or lunches) for 4 people, plus breakfast cereal and snacks. Freeze dried food would cost twice as much. As would MRE's (meals refused by Ethiopians). Most of the ingredients we would actually use since canned beans and tomato products are often in our repertoire. And I will try some of the recipes on my video night pals too. Cans last a few years so it would be a while before it would all go to the food bank. I could not bring myself to buy instant rice because the way we cook rice does not take much fuel. I just bring to a boil and turn off gas. A hotbox would help. Because of recent events in Japan I had the blessing of my family to put all this together and share the cost.
happy in the kitchen
happy in the kitchen
You might think, looking at this pile of library books, that I'm obsessed with food, but it's not true... it's cooking I'm obsessed with. Learning new techniques and combinations of flavors that I can use when cooking for friends or with Matt on an "at home" evening. I'm slowly but surely plowing my way through this pile, though the two books I've used the most so far are over at Matt's house... Peter Reinhart's "The Bread Baker's Apprentice" is one I'd been meaning to read for a long time, and his newer "Whole Grain Breads: new techniques, extraordinary flavor" is a revelation and a delight. I've baked bread for years but had not yet delved into the world of the more complex and satisfying sourdoughs and other fermented loaves. This weekend I eschewed (temporarily I promise!) his advice to read the first informative chapters before trying the recipes and made the whole grain cinnamon raisin bread that involved making two very different starters the evening before. I thought perhaps I was being punished for my hubris when it took the entire day for the loaves to do their two rises and then I had to stay up past bedtime to wait for them to cook. When I took them out and left them on the counter overnight to cool I was convinced they were going to taste like lead, but when we sliced and toasted it this morning the kitchen was redolent of cinnamon and the bread, though dense, was delicious and as satisfying as the artisan breads we find at Whole Foods. Just to make sure, I had another slice with soup for lunch and discovered it was just as fine untoasted. Now I can't wait to read those important first chapters and try more of the "receets" as my grandma woulda said. My favorite on this pile- so far- is the one on top that I'm in the middle of now- "Animal, Vegetable, Miracle" by Barbara Kingsolver- about the year she and her family decided to eat only home-and-locally grown food. She's an extraordinary writer and the premise of their experiment is something I think about all the time, especially as we discover how much the large-scale farming industry has bred out the flavor in foods to make them more transportable and uniform, and how much energy is spent trucking foods from far away to places where it is out of season. There's a wealth of common sense in that book and I'm savoring every page, in no hurry to finish. The other one I've delved a bit into is "Two Meatballs in an Italian Kitchen". At first I thought the premise- two very different Italian cooks, one native to Italy and one brought up in Queens in New York, arguing about differing techniques and preferences- could get tedious. But the dialogue and mostly mock argumentativeness is really enlightening, and the recipes are fabulous. For instance, the other night we had a whole wheat pasta dish where the vegetable sauce was made by cutting several vegetables into quarter inch dice and then roasting them before finishing them in a saute pan, breaking the vegetables down until they become a slightly chunky but very creamy sauce, sans cream! Delicious! Stay tuned. I'll try to get shots of some of the recipes I try out of each of them as I race to read them all before the library won't let me renew them any more. :-)

whole foods for the whole family cookbook
whole foods for the whole family cookbook
Against the Grain: Delicious Recipes for the Whole Food and Grain-Free Diet (Modern Alternative Mama: In the Kitchen)
Are you grain-free? Whether it's due to allergy, weight loss, or doing the GAPS diet, grain-free eating isn't easy. In fact, it can get pretty boring: lots of plain baked or grilled meats and steamed veggies. Who wants to eat boring, bland food forever? Especially on long-term, family diets (like GAPS), family members are likely to balk and "fall off the wagon" if they're expected to eat so much of the same all the time.

But grain-free doesn't have to be boring. In fact, grain-free can include all kinds of interesting flavors, spices, and even sauces. Grain-free can be delicious and exciting. It can even include breads and desserts! That's how Against the Grain came to be: a cookbook full of grain-free (mostly dairy-free and GAPS-friendly) recipes that aren't boring, but are delicious and fun to eat.

Against the Grain is a 55-page guide to delicious grain-free eating. It contains 30 amazing recipes, including 6 "breads and desserts!" Yes, you can have dessert, even grain-free!

Against the Grain doesn't use any weird or unusual ingredients: instead, it focuses on fresh, delicious flavors that are easily found at any regular grocery store. It also focuses entirely on whole foods -- no weird, science-experiment-type ingredients! That's a major complaint among a lot of gluten- and grain-free families: strange, processed ingredients to replace the grains or dairy. But not in this book! Everything is based entirely in real food. That means you don't even have to adapt the recipes to be healthy!

Not grain-free? Against the Grain has delicious recipes that are an asset to any family's kitchen repertoire! See the Table of Contents for all the amazing foods.

If you're on GAPS, this book is perfect for you. While there are a couple of recipes that aren't quite suitable for GAPS, most are. In fact, our family was on GAPS during most of the creation and testing of this book! (Note that not all are suitable for intro, but the vast majority are for full GAPS.) There are 27 delicious GAPS-friendly recipes!

Are you grain-free? Whether it's due to allergy, weight loss, or doing the GAPS diet, grain-free eating isn't easy. In fact, it can get pretty boring: lots of plain baked or grilled meats and steamed veggies. Who wants to eat boring, bland food forever? Especially on long-term, family diets (like GAPS), family members are likely to balk and "fall off the wagon" if they're expected to eat so much of the same all the time.

But grain-free doesn't have to be boring. In fact, grain-free can include all kinds of interesting flavors, spices, and even sauces. Grain-free can be delicious and exciting. It can even include breads and desserts! That's how Against the Grain came to be: a cookbook full of grain-free (mostly dairy-free and GAPS-friendly) recipes that aren't boring, but are delicious and fun to eat.

Against the Grain is a 55-page guide to delicious grain-free eating. It contains 30 amazing recipes, including 6 "breads and desserts!" Yes, you can have dessert, even grain-free!

Against the Grain doesn't use any weird or unusual ingredients: instead, it focuses on fresh, delicious flavors that are easily found at any regular grocery store. It also focuses entirely on whole foods -- no weird, science-experiment-type ingredients! That's a major complaint among a lot of gluten- and grain-free families: strange, processed ingredients to replace the grains or dairy. But not in this book! Everything is based entirely in real food. That means you don't even have to adapt the recipes to be healthy!

Not grain-free? Against the Grain has delicious recipes that are an asset to any family's kitchen repertoire! See the Table of Contents for all the amazing foods.

If you're on GAPS, this book is perfect for you. While there are a couple of recipes that aren't quite suitable for GAPS, most are. In fact, our family was on GAPS during most of the creation and testing of this book! (Note that not all are suitable for intro, but the vast majority are for full GAPS.) There are 27 delicious GAPS-friendly recipes!

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