SCHOOLHOUSE GLASS SHADE. SCHOOLHOUSE GLASS

SCHOOLHOUSE GLASS SHADE. HOW TO MEASURE FOR ROMAN SHADES. SHADES FOR DECKS

Schoolhouse Glass Shade


schoolhouse glass shade
    schoolhouse
  • A building used as a school, esp. in a small community or village
  • Named after their traditional use in old American colonial schoolhouses. They feature an octagonal or round dial mounted above a pendulum box.
  • school: a building where young people receive education; "the school was built in 1932"; "he walked to school every morning"
  • (Schoolhouses) One-room schools were commonplace throughout rural portions of various countries including the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, United Kingdom, Ireland and Spain in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
    glass
  • A thing made from, or partly from, glass, in particular
  • furnish with glass; "glass the windows"
  • a container for holding liquids while drinking
  • a brittle transparent solid with irregular atomic structure
  • A hard, brittle substance, typically transparent or translucent, made by fusing sand with soda, lime, and sometimes other ingredients and cooling rapidly. It is used to make windows, drinking containers, and other articles
  • Any similar substance that has solidified from a molten state without crystallizing
    shade
  • Screen from direct light
  • represent the effect of shade or shadow on
  • shadow: cast a shadow over
  • Cover, moderate, or exclude the light of
  • relative darkness caused by light rays being intercepted by an opaque body; "it is much cooler in the shade"; "there's too much shadiness to take good photographs"
  • Darken or color (an illustration or diagram) with parallel pencil lines or a block of color
schoolhouse glass shade - Schoolhouse 16-Inch
Schoolhouse 16-Inch Wide Powellhurst Glass Shade from Destination Lighting
Schoolhouse 16-Inch Wide Powellhurst Glass Shade from Destination Lighting
Opal glass finish. Fits fixtures with a 6-inch fitter. Offering unique collections from a consortium of designers, Design Classics features more than 1,300 elegantly styled yet affordable priced items; many of which are exclusive, signature designs. As a direct importer, the company provides the most competitive pricing without compromising quality or innovation. Hallmarks of Design Classic products include Energy Star-rated fixtures and the patented Clever Lever SwitchTM. Design Classics is an exclusive line of Destination Lighting. This period lighting piece is inspired by the Early American Schoolhouse style made popular during the first half of the 20th century. DL # 372421.

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Newtown High School
Newtown High School
90th Street, Elmhurst, Queens Newtown High School, one of Elmhurst's and Queen's most prominent buildings, is a reminder of the long history of commitment and dedication to public education by the people of Queens and New York City. The school is the result of several building campaigns, which began with the construction of a small, wooden school house in 1866 to serve children from the Village of Newtown and the surrounding farms. The school's first expansion took place in 1898-1900, when a much larger, brick building, designed by the architectural firm Boring & Tilton, was added to the site. The school accommodated both grammar and high school students until 1910, when the lower grades were moved out and this facility was renamed Newtown High School, in honor of Elmhurst's historic name. The 1866 and 1898-1900 buildings were subsequently demolished. As Elmhurst's population grew in the early twentieth century, Newtown High School needed to expand. In 191718, C.B.J. Snyder, the noted Superintendent of School Buildings for the Board of Education, designed an impressive Flemish Renaissance Revival-style addition to the school, which featured stepped gables and a dramatic 169-foot, centrally-placed tower topped by a cupola and turrets. Snyder's choice of the Flemish Renaissance Revival style showed his awareness of New York's, and particularly Elmhurst's, beginning as a Dutch colony, as well as his respect for Boring & Tilton's turn-of-the-century Flemish Renaissance Revival-style design. It is one of a handful of public schools in New York City executed in this style. The start of construction was delayed until 1920 by the First World War, a fire that destroyed the first set of blueprints, and problems with the contractor. The new wing opened in September 1921. Two handsome, but more simply-designed Flemish Renaissance Revival-style wings, designed by Walter C. Martin, were constructed in 1930-31. In 1956-58, Boring & Tilton's turn-of-the-century wing was replaced by an International Style addition, designed by the Manhattan architectural firm Maurice Salo & Associates. The remarkably intact Newtown High School now serves a diverse body of 4,500 students and more than 200 teachers. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS Public High Schools in Greater New York At the turn of the century, a unified public educational system, including secondary schools, was created in New York City from numerous independently administered school districts, which had a variety of curricula, grade divisions, educational policies, and standards for personnel selection. Several individuals and factors were responsible for developing this system: education reformers, such as Nicholas Murray Butler, whose efforts culminated in the School Reform Law of 1896; the consolidation of New York City in 1898; and the city charter revision of 1901. Prior to this time, New York City did not have any full-time public high schools, although some courses, including "manual training" (such as cooking, sewing, and woodworking), were offered in evening high schools beginning in the late 1880s. In contrast, the City of Brooklyn opened Central Grammar School in 1878 with two additional grades above the sixth (in 1891, it launched two separate schools, Boys' High and Girls' High); it organized the Manual Training High School in 1893; and Erasmus Hall Academy, established in 1786, became Erasmus Hall High School in 1896. High school courses were also offered in several early Staten Island schools. Some sections of Queens County also opened high schools in the nineteenth century: Flushing in 1875 and Long Island City in 1889. Elmhurst, however, did not get a separate high school until 1910. Faced with a tremendous shortage of school buildings, the Board of Education embarked on a vast program of school construction after consolidation. The need was exacerbated by the Compulsory Education Law of 1894, which mandated school attendance until age fourteen, and the huge increase in immigration at the end of the nineteenth century (between 1900 and 1910 alone the city's population grew by nearly 39 percent). Plans made to construct the first four new high school buildings -- a girls' school and a boys' school, both in Manhattan, a school in the Bronx, and, at a future date, a manual training school in Manhattan -- culminated in Wadleigh High School for Girls (1901-02), 215 West 114th Street, Manhattan; DeWitt Clinton High School (1903-05), 899 Tenth Avenue; Morris High School (1900-04), East 166th Street and Boston Road, the Bronx; and Stuyvesant High School (1905-07), 345 East 15th Street, Manhattan. Early History of Elmhurst, Queens, and Newtown High School At the time of the consolidation of Greater New York in 1898, the three westernmost townships of Queens County - Jamaica, Flushing, and Newtown (now Elmhurst) - voted to become part of New York City. The remaining towns formed Nassau County. Newtown, which bordered the Eas
Newtown High School
Newtown High School
90th Street, Elmhurst, Queens Newtown High School, one of Elmhurst's and Queen's most prominent buildings, is a reminder of the long history of commitment and dedication to public education by the people of Queens and New York City. The school is the result of several building campaigns, which began with the construction of a small, wooden school house in 1866 to serve children from the Village of Newtown and the surrounding farms. The school's first expansion took place in 1898-1900, when a much larger, brick building, designed by the architectural firm Boring & Tilton, was added to the site. The school accommodated both grammar and high school students until 1910, when the lower grades were moved out and this facility was renamed Newtown High School, in honor of Elmhurst's historic name. The 1866 and 1898-1900 buildings were subsequently demolished. As Elmhurst's population grew in the early twentieth century, Newtown High School needed to expand. In 191718, C.B.J. Snyder, the noted Superintendent of School Buildings for the Board of Education, designed an impressive Flemish Renaissance Revival-style addition to the school, which featured stepped gables and a dramatic 169-foot, centrally-placed tower topped by a cupola and turrets. Snyder's choice of the Flemish Renaissance Revival style showed his awareness of New York's, and particularly Elmhurst's, beginning as a Dutch colony, as well as his respect for Boring & Tilton's turn-of-the-century Flemish Renaissance Revival-style design. It is one of a handful of public schools in New York City executed in this style. The start of construction was delayed until 1920 by the First World War, a fire that destroyed the first set of blueprints, and problems with the contractor. The new wing opened in September 1921. Two handsome, but more simply-designed Flemish Renaissance Revival-style wings, designed by Walter C. Martin, were constructed in 1930-31. In 1956-58, Boring & Tilton's turn-of-the-century wing was replaced by an International Style addition, designed by the Manhattan architectural firm Maurice Salo & Associates. The remarkably intact Newtown High School now serves a diverse body of 4,500 students and more than 200 teachers. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS Public High Schools in Greater New York At the turn of the century, a unified public educational system, including secondary schools, was created in New York City from numerous independently administered school districts, which had a variety of curricula, grade divisions, educational policies, and standards for personnel selection. Several individuals and factors were responsible for developing this system: education reformers, such as Nicholas Murray Butler, whose efforts culminated in the School Reform Law of 1896; the consolidation of New York City in 1898; and the city charter revision of 1901. Prior to this time, New York City did not have any full-time public high schools, although some courses, including "manual training" (such as cooking, sewing, and woodworking), were offered in evening high schools beginning in the late 1880s. In contrast, the City of Brooklyn opened Central Grammar School in 1878 with two additional grades above the sixth (in 1891, it launched two separate schools, Boys' High and Girls' High); it organized the Manual Training High School in 1893; and Erasmus Hall Academy, established in 1786, became Erasmus Hall High School in 1896. High school courses were also offered in several early Staten Island schools. Some sections of Queens County also opened high schools in the nineteenth century: Flushing in 1875 and Long Island City in 1889. Elmhurst, however, did not get a separate high school until 1910. Faced with a tremendous shortage of school buildings, the Board of Education embarked on a vast program of school construction after consolidation. The need was exacerbated by the Compulsory Education Law of 1894, which mandated school attendance until age fourteen, and the huge increase in immigration at the end of the nineteenth century (between 1900 and 1910 alone the city's population grew by nearly 39 percent). Plans made to construct the first four new high school buildings -- a girls' school and a boys' school, both in Manhattan, a school in the Bronx, and, at a future date, a manual training school in Manhattan -- culminated in Wadleigh High School for Girls (1901-02), 215 West 114th Street, Manhattan; DeWitt Clinton High School (1903-05), 899 Tenth Avenue; Morris High School (1900-04), East 166th Street and Boston Road, the Bronx; and Stuyvesant High School (1905-07), 345 East 15th Street, Manhattan. Early History of Elmhurst, Queens, and Newtown High School At the time of the consolidation of Greater New York in 1898, the three westernmost townships of Queens County - Jamaica, Flushing, and Newtown (now Elmhurst) - voted to become part of New York City. The remaining towns formed Nassau County. Newtown, which bordered the East

schoolhouse glass shade
schoolhouse glass shade
White Frosted Schoolhouse Globe Ceiling Fan Glass Bowl Shade
G322WH Choose this shade to refine the style of your Fanimation ceiling fan. It will add a decorative dimension to your ceiling fan. This closed glass bowl should be used only with F421 fitter. Features: -White frosted schoolhouse globe closed glass -F421 (single fitter) required -Overall dimensions: 6'' H x 9'' W About Fanimation: Since Fanimation s inception in 1984, they have become an acknowledged leader in the industry by creating and producing refreshingly innovative ceiling fans for a wide variety of venues. Fanimation s founder, Tom Frampton, is well known for his creativity and entrepreneurial spirit. Tom began Fanimation in his garage, with three fan designs. From the start, their benchmark designs have set the standard for the industry. The growth of Fanimation s outstanding collection of fans has been nothing short of spectacular. Their collection now includes more than 16 fan designs. With numerous fan blade, lighting, finishing and accessory options, the number of ways these fans can be customized is practically limitless. Fanimation is dedicated to creating and manufacturing high-quality ceiling fans that are as functional as they are expressive. The development of their product line throughout their 20-year history reflects their number one priority the satisfaction of customers.

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