INSTRUMENTS USED IN COUNTRY MUSIC : INSTRUMENTS USED IN

Instruments Used In Country Music : Cool Saxophone Music : Yamaha Saxophone.

Instruments Used In Country Music


instruments used in country music
    country music
  • Country Music is the twelfth studio album of American country singer Marty Stuart. With his previous album The Pilgrim, Stuart had established himself as a serious recording artist and an accomplished musician. For this album, he formed a new backing band, called the Fabulous Superlatives.
  • Country music (or country and Western) is a blend of traditional and popular musical forms traditionally found in the Southern United States and the Canadian Maritimes that evolved rapidly beginning in the 1920s.Peterson, Richard A. (1999). Creating Country Music: Fabricating Authenticity, p.9.
  • A form of popular music originating in the rural southern US. It is traditionally a mixture of ballads and dance tunes played characteristically on fiddle, guitar, steel guitar, drums, and keyboard
  • a simple style of folk music heard mostly in the southern United States; usually played on stringed instruments
    instruments
  • (instrument) equip with instruments for measuring, recording, or controlling
  • (instrument) the means whereby some act is accomplished; "my greed was the instrument of my destruction"; "science has given us new tools to fight disease"
  • A person who is exploited or made use of
  • A tool or implement, esp. one for delicate or scientific work
  • A thing used in pursuing an aim or policy; a means
  • (instrument) a device that requires skill for proper use
    used in
  • The object class definitions which require or allow an attribute of this type when creating that class of object.
instruments used in country music - The Real
The Real Book: Sixth Edition
The Real Book: Sixth Edition
The Real Books are the best-selling jazz books of all time. Since the 1970s, musicians have trusted these volumes to get them through every gig, night after night. The problem is that the books were illegally produced and distributed, without any regard to copyright law, or royalties paid to the composers who created these musical masterpieces. Hal Leonard is very proud to present the first legitimate and legal editions of these books ever produced. You won't even notice the difference, other than that all of the notorious errors have been fixed: the covers and typeface look the same, the song list is nearly identical, and the price for our edition is even cheaper than the original! Every conscientious musician will appreciate that these books are now produced accurately and ethically, benefitting the songwriters that we owe for some of the greatest tunes of all time! Includes 400 songs: All Blues * Au Privave * Autumn Leaves * Black Orpheus * Bluesette * Body and Soul * Bright Size Life * Con Alma * Dolphin Dance * Don't Get Around Much Anymore * Easy Living * Epistrophy * Falling in Love with Love * Footprints * Four on Six * Giant Steps * Have You Met Miss Jones? * How High the Moon * I'll Remember April * Impressions * Lullaby of Birdland * Misty * My Funny Valentine * Oleo * Red Clay * Satin Doll * Sidewinder * Stella by Starlight * Take Five * There Is No Greater Love * Wave * and hundreds more!

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Country and Western Music Hall of Fame Nashville (TN) July 2011
Country and Western Music Hall of Fame Nashville (TN) July 2011
The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum is located at 222 Fifth Avenue South in Nashville (TN). Its mission is to document the history of country music and to honor its major figures. Within the building lies the Hall of Fame itself, which consists of plaques honoring the most famous of country and western music-related personalities as designated by the Country Music Association (CMA). In May, 2001, the non-profit Country Music Foundation held the grand opening of its new $37 million facility in downtown Nashville. Featured exhibits include "Sing Me Back Home: A Journey through Country Music", with a collection of original recordings, instruments, costumes, and photographs, as well as the Hall of Fame Rotunda, which displays the plaques of all the inductees to the Country Music Hall of Fame. An intimate concert venue, the Ford Theatre, is also located within the building. The new building's exterior is laced with symbolic images. As shown above, the most obvious of these are the windows that look like the black keys of a piano. More conspicuous images include the diamond-shaped radio mast, which is a miniaturized replica of the WSM tower a few miles south of Nashville. The round discs surrounding the tower symbolize the different size records and CDs country music has been recorded upon. When viewed from the air, the building is in the shape of a bass clef. The north-west corner of the building juts out like the tail fin of a '57 Chevy. Image by Ron Cogswell on Friday July 22, 2011, using a Nikon D80 and a Photoshop photocopy filter. DSC_0040 V2
The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum -- Nashville (TN) July 2011
The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum -- Nashville (TN) July 2011
The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum is located at 222 Fifth Avenue South in Nashville (TN). Its mission is to document the history of country music and to honor its major figures. Within the building lies the Hall of Fame itself, which consists of plaques honoring the most famous of country and western music-related personalities as designated by the Country Music Association (CMA). In May 2001, the non-profit Country Music Foundation held the grand opening of its new $37 million facility in downtown Nashville. Featured exhibits include "Sing Me Back Home: A Journey through Country Music", with a collection of original recordings, instruments, costumes, and photographs, as well as the Hall of Fame Rotunda, which displays the plaques of all the inductees to the Country Music Hall of Fame. An intimate concert venue, the Ford Theatre, is also located within the building. The new building's exterior is laced with symbolic images. As shown above, the most obvious of these are the windows that look like the black keys of a piano. More conspicuous images include the diamond-shaped radio mast, which is a miniaturized replica of the WSM tower a few miles south of Nashville. The round discs surrounding the tower symbolize the different size records and CDs country music has been recorded upon. When viewed from the air, the building is in the shape of a bass clef. The north-west corner of the building juts out like the tail fin of a '57 Chevy. Image by Ron Cogswell on July 22, 2011, using a Nikon D80 and a Photoshop photocopy filter. DSC_0040 V1

instruments used in country music
instruments used in country music
Alison Krauss & Union Station Live
ALISON KRAUSS & UNION STATION LIVE - DVD Movie

If you love concert DVDs that offer first-rate music, excellent sound and picture, a beautiful setting, and substantial bonus features, then Alison Krauss and Union Station Live is destined to become your new favorite. It's not just for bluegrass fans either, as proven by Krauss's crossover success on the smash soundtrack of O Brother, Where Art Thou? as well as her pop-oriented hits such as "Now That I've Found You." That song plus "The Lucky One," "When You Say Nothing at All," and others are the perfect showcase for Krauss's meltingly gorgeous voice, and admirers of the concert's two-CD set will also find out how funny she is in her between-songs banter. AKUS has never been all about Krauss, however, so there are also instrumental jams plus featured spots for other members, including Dan Tyminski on O Brother's rousing "I Am a Man of Constant Sorrow."
The second DVD offers 50 minutes of interviews in which all five members plus drummer Larry Atamanuik discuss their influences, their instruments, and their favorite songs. There's also backstage and road footage, baby pictures, and more. Perhaps the only disappointment is that two songs from the CDs are not included in the concert: "Down to the River to Pray," which is heard over the end credits but not shown on stage--presumably because the CD version was not taken from this 2002 Louisville show--and "There Is a Reason." --David Horiuchi

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