KING GEORGE FLORIST. GEORGE FLORIST

KING GEORGE FLORIST. HALLS WHOLESALE FLOWERS

King George Florist


king george florist
    king george
  • George King may refer to: * George King (actor) best known for the role of Mr. Flak in the 2007 film version of Hairspray * George King (Aetherius Society) (1919 – 1997), British founder of the Aetherius Society new religious movement * George King (basketball) (1928 – 2006), American basketball
    florist
  • A person who sells and arranges plants and cut flowers
  • someone who grows and deals in flowers; "the florist made up an attractive bouquet"
  • (floral) resembling or made of or suggestive of flowers; "an unusual floral design"
  • a shop where flowers and ornamental plants are sold
king george florist - King George:
King George: The Triumphs And Tragedies In The Life Of George Strait (Volume 1)
King George: The Triumphs And Tragedies In The Life Of George Strait (Volume 1)
KING GEORGE The Triumphs and Tragedies In The Life of George Strait THE KING OF COUNTRY MUSIC THE TRAGEDIES ---George’s mother left him as a child when he was in the third grade. She took his little sister with her. His mother died in 2010 estranged from her famous son. ---George’s beautiful 13 year old daughter, Jennifer was killed in an automobile accident in 1986. ---George’s older brother, John “Buddy” Strait was found dead in a San Antonio, Texas motor inn in 2009. The Autopsy was immediately sealed. THE TRIUMPHS ---57 number one hit records…a record that may never be broken by any artist of any musical genre…more than Elvis, Michael Jackson or the Beatles. ---The 1981 birth of George’s namesake, George Harvey “Bubba” Strait, Jr., his rodeo-ridin son who is writing songs for a career of his own. ---George’s nearly 40 year marriage to his high school sweetheart, Norma Voss, the lady that keeps him coming back for more. “An amazing story of an amazing life!” ----Texas Music Magazine

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IMG 8789
IMG 8789
The Queen Victoria Building, or QVB, is a late nineteenth century building by the architect George McRae in the central business district of Sydney, Australia. The Romanesque Revival building is 190 metres long by 30 wide, and fills a city block, bounded by George, Market, York and Druitt Streets. Designed as a shopping centre, it was later used for a variety of other purposes until its restoration and return to its original use in the late twentieth century. The site of the Queen Victoria Building was the location of the George Street Markets, and was selected for the construction of a grand government building. Architect George McRae designed the QVB in the ornate Romanesque Revival style with the express purpose of employing a great number of skilled craftsmen who were out of work due to a severe recession. The building was completed in 1898 and named the Queen Victoria Building after the monarch. The completed building included coffee shops, showrooms and a concert hall. It provided a business environment for tradesmen such as tailors, mercers, hairdressers, and florists. The concert hall was later changed to a municipal library and the building was partitioned into small offices for Sydney City Council. The building steadily deteriorated and in 1959 was threatened with demolition. It was restored between 1984 and 1986 by Ipoh Ltd at a cost of $86 million, under the terms of a 99-year lease from the City Council and now contains mostly upmarket boutiques and "brand-name" shops. Ipoh finished a $26 million refurbishment in 2009 to keep pace with other commercial buildings in the 21st century. The changes include new shopfronts, glass signage, glazed balustrades, new escalators connecting ground, first and second levels and new colour schemes. The modern changes have been described by critics as kitsch and threatening the heritage values of the historic building. They believe that the new glass and mirrored escalators intrude into space of the original architecture and that the frameless shopfronts, glass signage and new colour schemes have lowered the heritage significance of the whole building. l dome, consisting of an interior glass dome and a copper-sheathed exterior, topped by a domed cupola. Smaller domes of various sizes are on the roofline, including a pair overtopping each end of the rectangular building. Stained glass windows, including a cartwheel window depicting the arms of the City of Sydney, allow light into the central area, and the roof itself incorporates arched skylights running lengthways north and south from the central dome. The intricate colonnades, arches, balustrades and cupolas make the exterior a visual feast of Victorian fussiness. Inside, the building consists of four main shopping floors, the top three pierced by voids protected by decorated cast-iron railings. Much of the tilework, especially under the central dome, is original, and the remainder is in keeping with this style. Underground passageways lead off to Town Hall Station at the southern end, and to a food court at the north. Two mechanical clocks, each one featuring dioramas and moving figures from moments in history, can be seen from the adjacent railed walkways. The Royal Clock, designed by Neil Glasser and made by Thwaites & Reed of Hastings in England, shows scenes of English royalty from King John signing the Magna Carta to the execution of King Charles I. Activating on the hour, the Royal Clock is accompanied by a trumpet voluntary written by Jeremiah Clarke. The Great Australian Clock, designed and made by Chris Cook, weighs four tonnes and stands ten metres tall. It includes 33 scenes from Australian history, seen from both Aboriginal and European perspectives. An Aboriginal hunter circles the exterior of the clock continuously, representing the never-ending passage of time. The building also contains many memorials and historic displays. Of these, two large glass cases stand out. The first display case contains an Imperial Chinese Bridal Carriage made entirely of jade and weighing over two tonnes, the only example found outside China. The second is a lifesize figure of Queen Victoria in a replica of her Coronation regalia, and surrounded by replicas of the British Crown Jewels. Her enthroned figure rotates slowly throughout the day, fixing the onlooker with her serene and youthful gaze. On the top level near the dome is displayed a sealed letter which is to be opened in 2085 by the future Lord Mayor of Sydney and read aloud to the People of Sydney. It is written by Queen Elizabeth II in 1986 and no one except her knows what is written. At the southern end of the building is the Bicentennial Plaza, facing the Sydney Town Hall across Druitt Street. Another statue of Queen Victoria can be found here, arrayed on a light grey stone plinth, the work of Irish sculptor John Hughes. This statue stood outside the legislative assembly of the Republic of Ireland - Dail Eireann in Leinster House, Dublin,
Weir Greenhouse (now McGovern-Weir Greenhouse)
Weir Greenhouse (now McGovern-Weir Greenhouse)
Sunset Park, Brooklyn, New York, New York City, United States The Weir Greenhouse is among the rarest of nineteenth-century survivors; it is the only Victorian commercial greenhouse known to be extant in New York City. Greenhouses are among the most fragile of building types and without constant maintenance they will quickly decay. The Weir Greenhouse has been in continuous use for almost a century, serving visitors to Greenwood Cemetery; lovingly cared for, it continues to grace the approach to this historic cemetery. The Wier Greenhouse - A History The Weir Greenhouse was built by James Weir, Jr., a member of a family that had long been active in local horticulture . The family business was established in Bay Ridge in 1850 by James Weir, a Scottish immigrant. In the 1870s James' sons John and Frederick joined the firm, which was renamed James Weir & Sons. By 1886 the company maintained twenty-five "well equipped" greenhouses at Bay Ridge and several "well-managed nurseries" at New Utrecht. James Weir's oldest son James Weir, Jr. (born in England in 1843) worked with his father for a few years, but established his own florist business in 1861. In 1866 he moved his business to 24th Street and Fifth Avenue near Greenwood Cemetery. This business soon moved to 25th Street between Fourth and Fifth Avenues, and in 1880 Weir commissioned a wood and glass greenhouse for the site at the corner of 25th Street and Fifth Avenue where the establishment is still located. This new building was designed, not by a commercial greenhouse manufacturer, but by the prominent local architect Mercein Thomas, who was responsible for a large number of extremely fine Romanesque Revival and Queen style residences in Brooklyn's choicest residential neighborhoods. This greenhouse, which was illustrated in Henry Stiles' History of Kings County and the City of Brooklyn, was a simple rectangular structure, 40 feet wide and 55 feet long. The entrance was contained within a corner tower which had a pyramidal roof capped by a weathervane (see illustration). Stiles described this greenhouse and its contents: /those/ who pass Mr. Weir's charming conservatory, redolent with the perfumes of the rarest exotics and native flowers, find this one of the chief attractions of the Cemetery, which never fails to elicit the warmest admiration... . In arrangement of the plants in Mr. Weir's conservatory one can not fail to observe the artistic skill in which each plant is so placed in relation to another as to produce the most exquisite harmony of color and form, enhanced by the fine arrangement of the grand center, composed of rock work. The small greenhouse remained un use until 1895 when Weir applied to the Brooklyn Buildings Department for a permit to alter the building. This alteration was so extensive that very little, if any, of the original greenhouse survives. As in 1880, Weir did not turn to a firm that specialized in greenhouse construction, but hired architect George Curtis Gillespie who had offices in Manhattan, but lived near the greenhouse. In addition, Gillespie is known to have designed an unidentified building known as the Weir Warehouse (1900). By the time the enlarged greenhouse was built, James Weir, Jr., had established the firm of James Weir, Jr. & Son with James E. Weir who became his father's partner in 1888. In 1894 Edward Weir, probably James E. Weir's son, entered the firm. In that year the firm opened a branch at the southern entrance to Greenwood Cemetery on Fort Hamilton Avenue near Gravesend Avenue. All three Weirs lived on 25th Street in houses located near the greenhouse. James Weir, Jr. lived at 236 25th Street for most of his adult life and James E. and Edward Weir lived at No. 228, which still stands. While the firm headed by James Weir, Jr. prospered near Greenwood Cemetery, the firm run by his father and brothers had moved into downtown Brooklyn. At various times in the 1890s and early twentieth century the business run by the two branches of the Weir family seem to have joined together, but it remains unclear exactly what the relationship was between James Weir & Sons and James Weir, Jr. & Son. The Weir family retained ownership of the greenhouse on Fifth Avenue and 25th Street until 1971 when it was sold to its present owners. The Weir florist was one of several greenhouses built in the nineteenth century near the entrances to Greenwood Cemetery. The cemetery,founded in 1838, had become by the mid-nineteenth century, an enormously popular attraction visited by thousands of people who came to attend funerals and visit gravesites, as well as simply to walk through the beautifully landscaped grounds. The celebration of death was an important feature of nineteenth-century American culture, and elaborate rituals developed which concerned the treatment of the dead and the conduct of the living. Flowers and wreaths played an important role in death ceremonies and could

king george florist
king george florist
The Madness of King George
Written by Alan Bennett from his stage play and featuring a towering performance by Nigel Hawthorne, and a stunning screen directorial debut (Variety) by Tony Award winner* Nicholas Hytner, this Academy AwardA(r)-winning** masterpiece of royal intrigue ispotent, engrossing and thrilling (Los Angeles Times). Just five years after losing the 'rebellious colonies, it appears that England's King George III (Hawthorne) is now losing his mind! Suddenly, the stately monarch is hallucinating, shouting obscenities, behaving lewdly towards the Queen's (Helen Mirren) comelylady-in-waiting and generally becoming a candidate for the lunatic asylum. The palace doctors are baffled, but the Prince of Wales (Rupert Everett), tired of playing the waiting game, conspires to take advantage of the situation. Will the King's supporters be able to restore their monarch's wits before he's stripped of his throne? *1994: Director (Musical), Carousel **1994: Art Direction

Nicholas Hytner had an international stage phenomenon with Alan Bennett's play The Madness of King George, starring Nigel Hawthorne as King George III, the British monarch who lost the American colonies. But in this film adaptation, Hytner unfortunately yields to the old temptation to "open up" the piece with lots of arbitrary exteriors, rushed set pieces, choppy editing, and so on, robbing Hawthorne's acclaimed stage performance of coherency and power on the big screen. Viewers are forced to fill in emotional gaps for themselves (and try to imagine what Bennett's work must have looked and felt like originally), and the whole enterprise has a pseudo-cinematic, self-congratulatory air. --Tom Keogh

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