FLOWER SHOP NETWORK. FLOWER SHOP

Flower shop network. Wedding floral stands. Flower girl dress 7

Flower Shop Network


flower shop network
    flower shop
  • Floristry is the general term used to describe the professional floral trade. It encompasses flower care and handling, floral design or flower arranging, merchandising, and display and flower delivery. Wholesale florists sell bulk flowers and related supplies to professionals in the trade.
    network
  • Link (machines, esp. computers) to operate interactively
  • Interact with other people to exchange information and develop contacts, esp. to further one's career
  • communicate with and within a group; "You have to network if you want to get a good job"
  • Connect as or operate with a network
  • an interconnected system of things or people; "he owned a network of shops"; "retirement meant dropping out of a whole network of people who had been part of my life"; "tangled in a web of cloth"
  • (broadcasting) a communication system consisting of a group of broadcasting stations that all transmit the same programs; "the networks compete to broadcast important sports events"
flower shop network - Akro-Mils RZJMINI
Akro-Mils RZJMINI Mini Stack-A-Pot, 14-Quart
Akro-Mils RZJMINI Mini Stack-A-Pot, 14-Quart
The Mini Stack-A-Pot by Akro-Mils- is perfect for your deck, patio, front porch, balcony or inside your home. The multi-tiered planter is crafted from durable, U.V. protected plastic and can withstand all four seasons outdoors! With a 14-quart capacity, the Mini Stack-A-Pot is ideal for the creative gardener. You can even add more layers by purchasing multiple units! Your planter includes three layers plus a base; each layer holds three plants. Imagine your home cascading with colorful flowers, tasty herbs, succulent strawberries, or plump tomatoes. The layers stack upward, saving you valuable space, and collapse again for easy storage! The perfect gift for gardeners of all levels.

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M2 & Rev Al - May 10, 1991
M2 & Rev Al - May 10, 1991
"The Cacophony Society is a randomly gathered network of free spirits united in the pursuit of experiences beyond the pale of mainstream society." I got involved in with the Cacophony Society at its San Francisco inception in 1986. One of the first events I attended involved getting into a harness and having John Law hoist me up into a hidden alcove alongside a busy freeway in the middle of the night. I became a dedicated Cacophonist after that and started organizing events, which were listed in our monthly newsletter. In 1991, I was spending a lot of time working on a technology contract in Los Angeles and decided it was an opportunity to launch a chapter of the Cacophony Society there. I rented a PO box and got a phone number with messaging service. Then I published the 1st newsletter for the LA area. I called it THE ZONE because of a couple of surreal tourist excursion events that we had made to LA. These were called Zone Trips. A Zone Trip is an overnight excursion to a remote location. Load a bunch of people into a rented van and drive all night. About 3 am reality begins to change. You see things differently. Maybe it's the combination of sleep depravation and drugs. So anyway, I published The Zone #1. Since there wasn't really an LA group to do any events, I filled it with a few choice events from San Francisco past and put dates on them that already passed. Then put out several hundred copies in bookstores and coffee shops around LA. It was like fishing. Thats how I caught Alan Ridenour... with lies. He picked up a copy of The Zone and was completely intrigued and appalled that he had just missed those fun events las month. He called the number and left a message. We later arranged a meeting at classic greasy spoon diner. I explained Cacophony to him and we then planned an event together. "Close Encounters Of The 5th Kind" was listed in the 2nd issue of The Zone. We planned the event around a UFO convention that was to be held in a couple weeks at the Hilton Hotel at LAX. I think that LA is the only place where you could say 'UFO Convention' with a straight face. Al and I created a flyer for the Church of Magnetic Light, which reveals the truth of psychic evolution and the transformation of mankind. The flyer tells the story of a holy statue called the Magnetic Christ which was stolen from small church in South America. The flyer also tells about the ancient Indian burial ground which was bulldozed over to make way for the LA airport and also points out that the jet planes taking off are amplifying the lines of magnetic flux emanating from the earths core at the end of the runway. The flyer also said that Jesus is landing a UFO in Vista Del Mar park at 9:13 p.m. that evening. So the day of UFO Convention, we had printed up several hundred of these flyers. Al brought a couple friends with him. Thats when I met Richard- he calls himself Rich Polysorbnate- Rich has lots of spare time on his hands. He's on disability because he can't hold a job- some kind of mental condition. But the guy is a genius. The week before the UFO convention, I bought one entry badge. With the aid of a color copier, we had more badges than we needed. Once inside, we learned that UFOs are real and that a lot of people will pay to know the truth. We learned that UFO cosmology has gotten a lot more complex now that its merged with the New Age. The convention was an out-of-this-world consumption experience. You could buy books, video tapes, and real extraterrestrial artifacts. There were amulets to protect you from the bad aliens and amulets to attract the good aliens. There were doormats that said 'UFO Crews Welcome'. One booth had posted actual photos of the inside of a UFO. I was standing behind a guy looking at the photos who exclaimed "That doesn't look like the UFO that I was in." At the convention, we placed small stacks of our flyers on tables at the booths. We also decided that we should come back next year. We'll dress in black and just hang out in the lobby, looking sinister. Vista Del Mar park is located near the beach at the end of the LAX runway. That day Al & I had gone to a flower shop. There was dumpster out back, which we got into and hauled out enough long-dead funeral flowers to fill the trunk of a car. That evening around 8, we go to Vista Del Mar park. There is about 30 people assembled. At the top of the hill, by himself, is is a guy on crutches. I start to feel bad. I go over and ask him how he found out. The flyer? No. The Cacophony newsletter? No. He says that he just knows to be here. Al and I prepare the hallowed ground for the UFO landing. I have 2 rolls of aluminum foil, which I rolled out in a giant X. We pile the flowers in the middle. Al has this cheap plaster statue of Jesus in day-glo colors. The spray-painted lips and eyes are off register. I'm sure it was mass-produced in a Tijuana factory by 12-year old kids on cocaine. Al sets the statue of J
Why I Shed Bikini for Niqab: The New Symbol of Women's Liberation
Why I Shed Bikini for Niqab: The New Symbol of Women's Liberation
By Sara Bokker Posted: 20 Zulhijjah 1427, 10 January 2007 I am an American woman who was born in the midst of America's "Heartland." I grew up, just like any other girl, being fixated with the glamour of life in "the big city." Eventually, I moved to Florida and on to South Beach of Miami, a hotspot for those seeking the "glamorous life." Naturally, I did what most average Western girls do. I focused on my appearance and appeal, basing my self-worth on how much attention I got from others. I worked out religiously and became a personal trainer, acquired an upscale waterfront residence, became a regular "exhibiting" beach-goer and was able to attain a "living-in-style" kind of life. Years went by, only to realize that my scale of self-fulfillment and happiness slid down the more I progressed in my "feminine appeal." I was a slave to fashion. I was a hostage to my looks. As the gap continued to progressively widen between my self-fulfillment and lifestyle, I sought refuge in escapes from alcohol and parties to meditation, activism, and alternative religions, only to have the little gap widen to what seemed like a valley. I eventually realized it all was merely a pain killer rather than an effective remedy. By now it was September 11, 2001. As I witnessed the ensuing barrage on Islam, Islamic values and culture, and the infamous declaration of the "new crusade," I started to notice something called Islam. Up until that point, all I had associated with Islam was women covered in "tents," wife beaters, harems, and a world of terrorism. As a feminist libertarian, and an activist who was pursuing a better world for all, my path crossed with that of another activist who was already at the lead of indiscriminately furthering causes of reform and justice for all. I joined in the ongoing campaigns of my new mentor which included, at the time, election reform and civil rights, among others. Now my new activism was fundamentally different. Instead of "selectively" advocating justice only to some, I learned that ideals such as justice, freedom, and respect are meant to be and are essentially universal, and that own good and common good are not in conflict. For the first time, I knew what "all people are created equal" really means. But most importantly, I learned that it only takes faith to see the world as one and to see the unity in creation. One day I came across a book that is negatively stereotyped in the West--The Holy Qur'an. I was first attracted by the style and approach of the Qur'an, and then intrigued by its outlook on existence, life, creation, and the relationship between Creator and creation. I found the Qur'an to be a very insightful address to heart and soul without the need for an interpreter or pastor. Eventually I hit a moment of truth: my new-found self-fulfilling activism was nothing more than merely embracing a faith called Islam where I could live in peace as a "functional" Muslim. I bought a beautiful long gown and head cover resembling the Muslim woman's dress code and I walked down the same streets and neighborhoods where only days earlier I had walked in my shorts, bikini, or "elegant" western business attire. Although the people, the faces, and the shops were all the same, one thing was remarkably distinct--I was not--nor was the peace at being a woman I experienced for the very first time. I felt as if the chains had been broken and I was finally free. I was delighted with the new looks of wonder on people's faces in place of the looks of a hunter watching his prey I had once sought. Suddenly a weight had been lifted off my shoulders. I no longer spent all my time consumed with shopping, makeup, getting my hair done, and working out. Finally, I was free. Of all places, I found my Islam at the heart of what some call "the most scandalous place on earth," which makes it all the more dear and special. While content with Hijab I became curious about Niqab, seeing an increasing number of Muslim women in it. I asked my Muslim husband, whom I married after I reverted to Islam, whether I should wear Niqab or just settle for the Hijab I was already wearing. My husband simply advised me that he believes Hijab is mandatory in Islam while Niqab is not. At the time, my Hijab consisted of head scarf that covered all my hair except for my face, and a loose long black gown called "Abaya" that covered all my body from neck to toe. A year-and-a-half passed, and I told my husband I wanted to wear Niqab. My reason, this time, was that I felt it would be more pleasing to Allah, the Creator, increasing my feeling of peace at being more modest. He supported my decision and took me to buy an "Isdaal," a loose black gown that covers from head to toe, and Niqab, which covers all my head and face except for my eyes. Soon enough, news started breaking about po

flower shop network
flower shop network
Southern Enterprises Calyx Flower Wall Sculpture
A truly eye catching piece of art, this hand painted masterpiece of beautiful flowers is sure to be a welcome addition to your home. The punched metal construction features an assortment of patterns on scattered across the many flower pedals. Each piece is truly unique. All of your guests are sure to admire such a fun piece of art. Features: Hand Painted Can be hung vertical or horizontal Durable metal construction Hangs as easily as a picture No assembly required Specifications:Overall Dimensions: 28.75" W x 5" D x 64.5" H

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