HOTEL IN PIERRE - HOTEL IN

Hotel in pierre - Cheap accommodation melbourne.

Hotel In Pierre


hotel in pierre
    pierre
  • The capital of South Dakota, in the central part of the state, on the Missouri River; pop. 13,876
  • capital of the state of South Dakota; located in central South Dakota on the Missouri river
  • The following are characters from the PlayStation game Chrono Cross.
  • Pierre is an animated short made by John R. Dilworth in 1985. It is the first animated short produced by John R. Dilworth.
    hotel
  • An establishment providing accommodations, meals, and other services for travelers and tourists
  • a building where travelers can pay for lodging and meals and other services
  • In French contexts an hotel particulier is an urban "private house" of a grand sort. Whereas an ordinary maison was built as part of a row, sharing party walls with the houses on either side and directly fronting on a street, an hotel particulier was often free-standing, and by the eighteenth
  • A code word representing the letter H, used in radio communication
  • A hotel is an establishment that provides paid lodging on a short-term basis. The provision of basic accommodation, in times past, consisting only of a room with a bed, a cupboard, a small table and a washstand has largely been replaced by rooms with modern facilities, including en-suite
hotel in pierre - Marco Pierre
Marco Pierre White
Marco Pierre White
Marco was born of working-class parents on a bleak council estate in Leeds, and his Italian mother died when he was six years old. Today he has become a star chef of international renown, a controversial media celebrity, a national icon of the 1980s and 1990s, and a multimillionaire entrpreneur - all before the age of 40. How has this staggering rise to fame and fortune been achieved? MPW (as he calls himself and many of his new restaurants) is today widely regarded as the best cook in the country, but his astonishing talents and understanding of food are only part of the explanation. As this fascinating book reveals, there are many sides to this complex man which the massive media coverage he has received over the years have never revealed. Charles Hennessy tells the story with insight: the unpromising early life, his first job as a kitchen porter in Harrogate, the epiphany at the age of 17 when he went to work at the Box Tree restaurant in Ilkley, his arrival in London, learning under the Roux brothers, Pierre Koffmann and Raymond Blanc, and the opening of his own first restaurant, Harvey's from whence his fame and fortune grew.

Marco was born of working-class parents on a bleak council estate in Leeds, and his Italian mother died when he was six years old. Today he has become a star chef of international renown, a controversial media celebrity, a national icon of the 1980s and 1990s, and a multimillionaire entrpreneur - all before the age of 40. How has this staggering rise to fame and fortune been achieved? MPW (as he calls himself and many of his new restaurants) is today widely regarded as the best cook in the country, but his astonishing talents and understanding of food are only part of the explanation. As this fascinating book reveals, there are many sides to this complex man which the massive media coverage he has received over the years have never revealed. Charles Hennessy tells the story with insight: the unpromising early life, his first job as a kitchen porter in Harrogate, the epiphany at the age of 17 when he went to work at the Box Tree restaurant in Ilkley, his arrival in London, learning under the Roux brothers, Pierre Koffmann and Raymond Blanc, and the opening of his own first restaurant, Harvey's from whence his fame and fortune grew.

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Hôtel de Ville de Paris
Hôtel de Ville de Paris
Paris, Franca. About Hotel de Ville de Paris The Hotel de Ville (French for "City Hall") in Paris, France, is the building housing the City of Paris's administration. Standing on the place de l'Hotel de Ville (formerly the place de Greve) in the city's IVe arrondissement, it has been the location of the municipality of Paris since 1357. It serves multiple functions, housing the local administration, the Mayor of Paris, Bertrand Delanoe, (since 1977), and also being a venue for large receptions. In July 1357, Etienne Marcel, provost of the merchants (i.e. mayor) of Paris, bought the so-called maison aux piliers ("House of Pillars") in the name of the municipality on the gently sloping shingle beach which served as a river port for unloading wheat and wood and later merged into a square, the Place de Greve (French for "Square of the Strand"), a place where Parisians often gathered, particularly for public executions. Ever since 1357, the City of Paris's administration has been located on the same location where the Hotel de Ville stands today. Before 1357, the city administration was located in the so-called parloir aux bourgeois ("Parlour of Burgesses") near the Chatelet. In 1533, King Francis I decided to endow the city with a city hall which would be worthy of Paris, then the largest city of Europe and Christendom. He appointed two architects: Italian Dominique de Cortone, nicknamed Boccador because of his red beard, and Frenchman Pierre Chambiges. The House of Pillars was torn down and Boccador, steeped in the spirit of the Renaissance, drew up the plans of a building which was at the same time tall, spacious, full of light and refined. Building work was not finished until 1628 during the reign of Louis XIII. During the next two centuries, no changes were made to the edifice which was the stage for several famous events during the French Revolution (notably the murder of the last provost of the merchants Jacques de Flesselles by an angry crowd on 14 July 1789 and the coup of 9 Thermidor Year II when Robespierre was shot in the jaw and arrested in the Hotel de Ville with his followers). Eventually, in 1835, on the initiative of Rambuteau, prefet of the Seine departement, two wings were added to the main building and were linked to the facade by a gallery, to provide more space for the expanded city government. During the Franco-Prussian War, the building played a key role in several political events. On 30 October 1870, revolutionaries broke into the building and captured the Government of National Defence, while making repeated demands for the establishment of a communard government. The existing government was rescued by soldiers who broke into the Hotel de Ville via an underground tunnel built in 1807, which still connects the Hotel de Ville with a nearby barracks. On 18 January 1871, crowds gathered outside the building to protest against speculated surrender to the Prussians, and were dispersed by soldiers firing from the building, who inflicted several casualties. The Paris Commune chose the Hotel de Ville as its headquarters, and as anti-Commune troops approached the building, Commune extremists set fire to the Hotel de Ville destroying almost all extant public records from the French Revolutionary period. The blaze gutted the building, leaving only a stone shell. Reconstruction of the hall lasted from 1873 through 1892. The reconstruction of the building was directed by architects Theodore Ballu and Edouard Deperthes following an architectural contest. Ballu also built the Church of La Trinite in the IXe arrondissement and the belfry of the town hall of the Ier arrondissement, opposite the Louvre's east facade. He also restored the Saint-Jacques Tower, a Gothic church tower in a square 150 metres to the west of the Hotel de Ville. The architects rebuilt the interior of the Hotel de Ville within the stone shell that had survived the fire. While the rebuilt Hotel de Ville is, from the outside, a copy of the 16th century French Renaissance building that stood before 1871, the new interior was based on an entirely new design, with ceremonial rooms lavishly decorated in the 1880s style. The central ceremonial doors under the clock are flanked by allegorical figures of Art, by Laurent Marqueste, and Science, by Jules Blanchard. Some 230 other sculptors were commissioned to produce 338 individual figures of famous Parisians on each facade, along with lions and other sculptural features. The sculptors included prominent academicians like Ernest-Eugene Hiolle and Henri Chapu, but easily the most famous was Auguste Rodin. Rodin produced the figure of the 18th Century mathematician Jean le Rond d'Alembert, finished in 1882. The statue on the garden wall on the south side is of Etienne Marcel, the most famous holder of the post of prevot des marchands (provost of merchants) which predated the office of mayor. Marcel came to a sticky end, lynched in 1358
Hotel Plaza Athénée, New York
Hotel Plaza Athénée, New York
Plaza Athenee New York 37 East 64th Street at Madison Ave, New York, NY 10065 The hotel’s brick and terra cotta facade, limestone lintels and sills, and exterior appurtenances. --------- Built in 1927 as the Hotel Alrae, the landmark building became the Hotel Plaza Athenee, New York in 1984. The architect was George F. Pelham. The hotel has undergone two multi-million dollar refurbishment projects in recent years – the first was completed in 1994, and the second in 2010. Felix Rohatyn, the powerful partner at Wall Street firm, Lazard Freres & Co., lived at the Hotel Alrae for five years in the 1970s. The blond actress Miriam Hopkins died in her room at the Hotel Alrae in 1972 In June 1981 - Trusthouse Forte whose holdings included the Westbury on East 69th Street, and the TraveLodge chain, bought and renovated the elderly Alrae Hotel. According to Albert Gelardi, president of Trusthouse Forte’s American subsidiary, the decision to acquire the Alrae was prompted by its loss of the lease to manage the luxury Pierre Hotel. The Alrae was owned by Richard Berger. Following the reconstruction, the 161-room 16-story hotel opened in 1984 and was named the Plaza Athenee, after Trusthouse Forte’s Paris hotel of the same name, and was expected to have room rates of $150 and up. The Alrae’s former restaurant – Chateau Henry IV – was transformed by Chef Daniel Boulud into the opulent and critically acclaimed Le Regence. Boulud arrived at the Plaza Athenee from the Westbury Hotel’s Polo Lounge which at that time was also owned by Forte Hotels. Waiters used silver domes, silver rolling carts and chariot carts to serve the nouvelle cuisine. In 1995 Trusthouse Forte managed the following hotels in the U.S.: Hotel Plaza Athenee, New York, The Iberville, New Orleans. The Palace, Philadelphia. The Pavillon, Miami. Plaza of the Americas, Dallas. The Westbury, New York. In January 1996 The Forte Group faced a hostile takeover from the British TV company Granada. In 1997 the 153-room Plaza Athenee was sold by Forte Hotels PLC to the Plaza Athenee Hotel Corp. Ltd. For $68,800,000 ($450,000 per room). As of March 1997 the Plaza Athenee New York is owned and operated by the Plaza Athenee Hotel Company Limited, a subsidiary of TCC Property Management Company Limited – which also owns the Hotel Plaza Athenee Bangkok. TCC Property Management is owned by Charoen Sirivadhanabhakdi, a billionaire Thailand liquor distributor. Jones Lang La Salle Hotels is the asset management at the Hotel Plaza Athenee. Arabelle is the Hotel Plaza Athenee’s in-house restaurant serving modern American cuisine focused on quality ingredients from local and certified organic farms. The hotel has undergone two multi-million dollar refurbishment projects in recent years – the first was completed in 1994, and the second in 2010. The latest renovation used the architectural firm of Stephen B. Jacobs Group and affiliate interior design firm of Andi Pepper Interior Design. The were given the task of reinterpreting the French Classic style in a younger and more contemporary idiom. Great care was taken to ensure that the renovation respected the architectural tradition of the 1927 masterpiece, including the restoration of the elegant canvas mural that dominates the hotel’s lobby.

hotel in pierre
hotel in pierre
Eclipse Series 19: Chantal Akerman in the Seventies (La Chambre / Hotel Monterey / News from Home / Je Tu Il Elle / Les Rendez-Vous d'Anna) (The Criterion Collection)
Over the past four decades, Belgian director Chantal Akerman (Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles) has created one of cinema’s most distinctive bodies of work—formally daring, often autobiographical films about people and places, time and space. In this collection, we present the early films that put her on the map: intensely personal, modernist investigations of cities, history, family, and sexuality, made in the 1970s in the United States and Europe and strongly influenced by the New York experimental film scene. Bold and iconoclastic, these five films pushed boundaries in their day and continue to have a profound influence on filmmakers all over the world.

La Chambre (1972, Silent, 11min) : In this early short film, we see the furniture and clutter of one small room in an apartment become the subject of a moving still life—with Akerman herself staring back at us. This breakthrough formal experiment is the first film the director made in New York.

Hotel Monterey (1972, Silent, 62 min): Under Akerman’s watchful eye, a cheap New York hotel glows with mystery and unexpected beauty, its corridors, elevators, rooms, windows, and occasional tenants framed as though part of an Edward Hopper tableau.

News From Home (1976, French w/ English Subs, 89 mins): Letters from Akerman’s mother are read over a series of elegantly composed shots of 1976 New York, where our (unseen) filmmaker and protagonist has relocated. Akerman’s unforgettable time capsule of the city is also a gorgeous meditation on urban alienation and personal and familial disconnection.

Je, Tu, Il, Elle (1974, B/W, French w/ English Subs, 86 min): In her sexually provocative first feature, Akerman stars as a nameless, rootless young woman who leaves self-imposed isolation to embark on a road trip that leads to lonely love affairs with a male truck driver and a former girlfriend. With its famous real-time sexual encounter and its daring minimalist plot, Je Tu Il Elle is Akerman’s most audaciously erotic film.

Les Rendez-vous d'Anna (1978, French w/ English Subs, 127 min): In one of Akerman’s most penetrating character studies, Anna, an accomplished filmmaker (played by Aurore Clement), makes her way through a series of anonymous European cities to promote her latest movie. Through a succession of eerie, exquisitely shot brief encounters—with men and women, family and strangers—we come to see her emotional and physical detachment from the world.

Eclipse is a selection of lost, forgotten, or overshadowed classics in simple, affordable editions. Each series is a brief cinematheque retrospective for the adventurous home viewer.

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