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Astoria Hotel In


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  • Hotel Astoria (гости?ница «Асто?рия») is a five-star hotel in Saint Petersburg, Russia. It is located on Saint Isaac's Square, next to Saint Isaac's Cathedral and across from the historic Imperial German Embassy.
astoria hotel in - Grand Hotels
Grand Hotels of the Jazz Age: The Architecture of Schultze & Weaver
Grand Hotels of the Jazz Age: The Architecture of Schultze & Weaver
The Breakers, the Waldorf, the Biltmore, the Sherry, the Pierrethese landmark hotels are synonymous with grand luxury and style. When they were built, in the 1920s, their refined elegance and grandeur set the bar for hotels and resorts the world over. Responsible for creating these and countless other hotels throughout the United States, were the partners of a single architectural firm: Schultze & Weaver. Together, this duoan architect and an engineervirtually invented the glamorous lifestyle made famous in films like Grand Hotel. Catering to the social elite of which they were themselves a part, Schultze & Weaver synthesized the Old World style of Renaissance Italy, Moorish Spain, and Georgian England with all of the modern amenities that made hotel living luxurious.
This book presents portfolios of fifteen of the firms most spectacular hotels, culminating in the Art Moderne masterpiece of the Waldorf-Astoria. Over two hundred period photographs and hand-colored architectural renderings chart the ascent of the American hotel in all its glory and glamour, before the Great Depression forever changed the lifestyles of America's rich and famous. Essays address the cultural and technological developments that underpin the creation of resort and residential hotels, including the elemental role played by Schultze & Weaver.
This book is published in conjunction with an exhibition at the Wolfsonian-Florida International University, Miami, held in celebration of their tenth anniversary.

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Waldorf-Astoria Hotel
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel
Park Avenue The Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and Towers, which recently celebrated its 60th anniversary on Park Avenue, was built in 1929-31 to be the second home of an internationally known, hundred-year-old New York establishment. Unlike its palatial predecessor on Fifth Avenue at 34th Street, the new Waldorf combined a transient hotel and a related but separate residential tower into a 625-foot-high skyscraper, one of the city's tallest at the time, located in the major new skyscraper office building district developing around Park Avenue near Grand Central Terminal. The architect of the hotel and towers, Lloyd Morgan of the firm of Schultze & Weaver, designed the complex in a sedate but handsome version of the modernistic style now generally referred to as Art Deco, adapting the skyscraper form and an up-to-date look to a conservative traditional establishment. The chief elements of the Waldorf s design include its modernistic massing as a twin-towered skyscraper; the gray limestone base with matching, specially made "Waldorf Gray" brick above; vertical rows of windows and modernistic spandrels; and bronze entryways, marquees, lanterns, and other ornament. Since opening, the hotel and the Towers have been home to some of the world's most famous figures, including presidents, kings and other potentates. The Waldorf-Astoria, continuing to serve as "New York's Unofficial Palace" (as it was once dubbed by the New York Times), remains one of the city's great hotels and major social establishments, and among the handsomest, if most sedate, of the city's Art Deco skyscrapers. Its great modernistic twin towers still form a very visible part of the skyline of midtown Manhattan. The Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and Towers form a 625-foot tall twin-towered skyscraper occupying the entire block bounded by Park and Lexington Avenues and East 49th and 50th Streets. The hotel's massing is arranged as 2O-story slabs with set-hacks (at the 18th floor on Park Avenue; at the 13th and 16th floors on Lexington) on Park and Lexington avenues, with a tower rising to twin peaks sandwiched between the slabs (the towers have 42 stories of residential space, above which sit the peaks, approximately equivalent to another ten stories). Though the hotel slabs are much the shorter, they occupy the prominent avenue facades; the towers, much the larger element, meet the ground on the more discreet side streets. The lower stories of the hotel and towers are faced in gray limestone, the upper stories of the towers in a matching gray brick. The modernistic twin-tower massing of the building is emphasized by the verticality of its bays of recessed windows and spandrels. Chief among the building's applied ornament are the abstract geometric patterns in the spandrels, in three patterns alternating across the facades on Park and Lexington Avenues. The other major ornamental detail is to be found on such decorative bronze work on all the building's facades as marquees, lanterns, flag-pole bases in the shape of eagles, announcement boards, store-front and window trim, stylized figures and floral motifs in the door surrounds, and an enormous geometrically patterned metal screen over the central windows on the avenue facades. The hotel is identified on both the Park and Lexington A venue facades by gilded letters spelling out its name; on Park the latter are framed by reliefs of classically-inspired figures. Though the interior has undergone many changes, and more recently a major restoration, the exterior has changed little over the decades. Noticeable changes include: air-conditioner sleeves which have been unsympathetically cut through many of the spandrels; canopies that have been erected over windows and doors; new marquees over both the Park and Lexington Avenue entries (those over the Towers entrances on East 49th and 50th Street appear to be original); new aluminum windows replacing the steel originals throughout the building (though a few originals survive); minor alterations to storefronts; the closing of an entrance formerly leading to the mid-block driveway on East 50th Street; and a pseudo-Japanese front that has been added to the 49th Street facade for a Japanese restaurant located there. - From the 1993 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report
Waldorf=Astoria Hotel
Waldorf=Astoria Hotel
Park Avenue view of the Waldorf=Astoria Hotel. Completed in 1931. The Waldorf-Astoria is a 47-story, Art Deco landmark, designed by architects Schultze and Weaver. Other New York City hotels by Schultz and Weaver include the Sherry Netherland and Hotel Pierre. Its name is derived from Walldorf, a the town in Germany and the birthplace of John Jacob Astor. Conrad Hilton bought the Waldorf=Astoria in 1949.

astoria hotel in
astoria hotel in
When the Astors Owned New York: Blue Bloods and Grand Hotels in a Gilded Age
In this marvelous anecdotal history, Justin Kaplan—Pulitzer Prize–winning biographer of Mark Twain—vividly brings to life a glittering, bygone age.

Endowed with the largest private fortunes of their day, cousins John Jacob Astor IV and William Waldorf Astor vied for primacy in New York society, producing the grandest hotels ever seen in a marriage of ostentation and efficiency that transformed American social behavior.

Kaplan exposes it all in exquisite detail, taking readers from the 1890s to the Roaring Twenties in a combination of biography, history, architectural appreciation, and pure reading pleasure.

In this marvelous anecdotal history, Justin Kaplan—Pulitzer Prize–winning biographer of Mark Twain—vividly brings to life a glittering, bygone age.

Endowed with the largest private fortunes of their day, cousins John Jacob Astor IV and William Waldorf Astor vied for primacy in New York society, producing the grandest hotels ever seen in a marriage of ostentation and efficiency that transformed American social behavior.

Kaplan exposes it all in exquisite detail, taking readers from the 1890s to the Roaring Twenties in a combination of biography, history, architectural appreciation, and pure reading pleasure.

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