HIGH YIELD INVESTMENT FRAUD : INVESTMENT FRAUD

High yield investment fraud : Investment plans for 2011.

High Yield Investment Fraud


high yield investment fraud
    investment fraud
  • Securities fraud, also known as stock fraud and investment fraud, is a practice that induces investors to make purchase or sale decisions on the basis of false information, frequently resulting in losses, in violation of the securities laws.
  • Any offers for investment opportunities that appear to be legitimate, but are actually fraudulent. Most of these offers promise high returns on investments for oil, new technologies, or gold, but victims who fall for them end up losing all of their money.
    high yield
  • In the context of hedge funds, a style of management that focuses on low rated fixed income securities.
  • yielding a large amount of agricultural or industrial production
  • In finance, a high-yield bond (non-investment-grade bond, speculative-grade bond, or junk bond) is a bond that is rated below investment grade at the time of purchase.
high yield investment fraud - Foreign Exchange
Foreign Exchange (Forex) AND High-Yield Investment Program (HYIP) , Fraud
Foreign Exchange (Forex) AND High-Yield Investment Program (HYIP) , Fraud
If you are a consumer or investor of stocks or precious metals, dabble in foreign currency trading, or trade commodity futures and options on the Internet, then you can't afford to miss this up-to-the-minute Investor Alert and Fraud Advisory issued by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) itself! Protect your money from financial fraud and learn how to spot the "real deal" versus get scammed by get-rich-quick schemes that offer high-return, low-risk investment opportunities. For the latest on consumer advice and alerts, what's safe and what's risky, what's legit and what's not, and what the regulators are doing to protect your investments from the many types of commodities fraud that exist in today's financial markets, this book is a must-read!

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W.T.F. IS GOING ONE HERE!!---ARE YOU KIDDING ME--- NOW HE'S BAILING OUT AN AFGAN BANK?? WHAT HAPPENED TO THE SPEECH TWO OR THREE DAYS AGO WHERE "IT WAS TIME TO CONCENTRATE ON THINGS AT HOME"???? ----
W.T.F. IS GOING ONE HERE!!---ARE YOU KIDDING ME--- NOW HE'S  BAILING OUT AN AFGAN BANK?? WHAT HAPPENED TO THE SPEECH TWO OR THREE DAYS AGO WHERE "IT WAS TIME TO CONCENTRATE ON THINGS AT HOME"???? ----
KABUL, Afghanistan — In a bid to fend off the threat of a nationwide financial crisis, the Afghan and United States governments tentatively agreed Saturday to bail out Afghanistan’s largest bank, according to Afghan and American officials. Details of the deal, including how much each government would contribute, were still being worked out on Saturday between the Central Bank of Afghanistan and the United States Treasury Department, officials said. Meanwhile, thousands of nervous Afghan depositors, unaware of the bailout and unconvinced of the bank’s solvency, stampeded the central branch of the beleaguered Kabul Bank to withdraw their savings. But the teller drawers were largely empty and most customers left empty-handed. The planned injection of cash into Kabul Bank is meant to slow the run on the bank by its customers, who have withdrawn more than $200 million in the past few days amid fears of a wider economic collapse. The panic began last week when the Central Bank ousted the chairman and the chief executive officer of Kabul Bank, after discovering that the bank had acted recklessly, lending millions of dollars to allies of President Hamid Karzai and pouring money into risky investments. Top officials at Kabul Bank and a senior leader at the Central Bank declined to comment publicly on the proposed bailout, which was still being negotiated. However a manager at the Central Bank and a senior American official confirmed what the American official called an “intervention.” A major shareholder in the bank, Mahmoud Karzai, the brother of the Afghan president, said Saturday that he was unaware of a bailout. He said such intervention would be unnecessary considering that the bank still retained half of its $600 million in assets. The official at the Afghan Central Bank, who requested anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the news media, said that the bank’s risk management department was taking over operations at Kabul Bank, and that Kabul’s existing management would be purged. The American official, who also requested anonymity, said that the United States contribution would not be large. The bailout comes several days after President Karzai and other top government officials pledged that they would guarantee deposits. But those assurances failed to curtail the rush of withdrawals. The government has blamed the international and local news media for inciting fears. Officials at Kabul Bank said they had not yet calculated how much money customers withdrew on Saturday, but that they believed that the figure was less than in previous days. On Thursday, one of the bank’s principal owners said depositors had withdrawn $180 million in the previous two days. Khalilullah Frozi, one of the two largest shareholders of Kabul Bank, said the bank retrieved $17 million in loans from borrowers on Saturday. But according to a bank employee distributing tickets for a place in line to bank patrons, the crowds on Saturday were higher than ever. The first customers showed up as early as 6 a.m. with several hundred customers adding to the line each hour. Nearly 2,000 clients had joined the line by 1 p.m. Inside the bank, customers waited tirelessly in saunalike conditions, as crowds made it impossible to discern where lines started and ended. Most of them left without cash. “What should I give you when I have nothing to give?” a teller who was out of cash told an agitated customer. One of the customers was a Central Bank employee, who said that the bailout would prevent a long-term crisis but that it did little to ease his short-term fears. “I don’t want to lose my money,” said the man, who refused to give his name because of his position at the Central Bank. The bank’s troubles began last week after a change in leadership and allegations that tens of millions of dollars were borrowed by political elites for risky real estate investments in Dubai. The crisis threatened to undermine confidence in Afghanistan’s fledgling financial system, which was built under American guidance after the collapse of the Taliban government in 2001. Among the clients of the bank is the government, which pays about 250,000 public employees through the bank. Mahmoud Karzai, the president’s brother, said the government “will absolutely guarantee” the salaries of public servants. He said the government was transferring money to Kabul Bank each day and that half of the bank’s assets were still solvent. Mahmoud Siakal, a former deputy foreign minister, said the bank’s problems reflected deeper problems with the government and the financial system. “What’s happening with Kabul Bank shows an advanced level of the weakening of rule of law since 2002,” said “We beg the world to invest here, and on the other hand, our own wealth is disappearing from the country. The fact that government is guaranteeing the bank won’t collapse, who gave them the right to inject all that money into Kabul Bank?” Some econ
THE LITTLE MAN SAYS: FLYYYY LITTLE DOLLARS FLYYYYY AWAY
THE LITTLE MAN SAYS:  FLYYYY LITTLE DOLLARS FLYYYYY AWAY
Americans' long journey to regain the wealth they lost in the recession is stalled. Households failed even to run in place during the April-June quarter Net worth — the value of assets like homes and investments, minus debts like mortgages and credit cards — fell 2.7 percent last quarter, or $1.5 trillion, the Federal Reserve said Friday. It now stands at $53.5 trillion. That's above the bottom hit during the recession, $48.8 trillion in the first quarter of 2009. But it's far below the pre-recession peak in wealth of $65.8 trillion. The drop from April to June was the first quarterly decline in America's wealth since early 2009. Before then, net worth had risen slowly for four straight quarters. Economists generally think household wealth has ticked up in the July-to-September quarter so far, because of higher stock prices. Yet given last quarter's setback and expectations of scant gains ahead, some economists have pushed back their forecast for when Americans will regain all their lost wealth: Not until the middle of this decade. Their stagnant wealth is likely to keep Americans reluctant from spending freely — and the struggling economy from picking up strength. Consumers tend to spend according to how wealthy they feel. And their spending accounts for about 70 percent of the economy. THANK YOU DEMOCRATS

high yield investment fraud
high yield investment fraud
Scam Artists and Seniors: How to Protect Yourself and Those You Love From Investment Fraud
As we age we become choice prospects for scam artists who target seniors with fraudulent schemes. They sound so convincing over the phone, they seem like such nice people who have our best interests in mind, and the investment they’re presenting appears quite promising. Sadly, having a good financial head on our shoulders isn't necessarily enough to prevent us from falling victim to investment fraud. It happens far more often than you may realize, and to those who you would least expect to fall prey to such things. Scam artists and the companies they work for continue to become more and more sophisticated, and the perpetrators continue to get better and better at what they do. This guide provides concrete steps for protecting yourself and those you love from ever falling victim to scam artists, as well as steps to take if you believe you have already been a victim of investment fraud. It provides you with contact information to investigate a company, a salesperson, and an investment offer, as well as instructions on reporting suspected fraud. You owe it to yourself to invest in a little reading before investing in anything else.

As we age we become choice prospects for scam artists who target seniors with fraudulent schemes. They sound so convincing over the phone, they seem like such nice people who have our best interests in mind, and the investment they’re presenting appears quite promising. Sadly, having a good financial head on our shoulders isn't necessarily enough to prevent us from falling victim to investment fraud. It happens far more often than you may realize, and to those who you would least expect to fall prey to such things. Scam artists and the companies they work for continue to become more and more sophisticated, and the perpetrators continue to get better and better at what they do. This guide provides concrete steps for protecting yourself and those you love from ever falling victim to scam artists, as well as steps to take if you believe you have already been a victim of investment fraud. It provides you with contact information to investigate a company, a salesperson, and an investment offer, as well as instructions on reporting suspected fraud. You owe it to yourself to invest in a little reading before investing in anything else.

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