FREE PEOPLE MAKEUP : PEOPLE MAKEUP

Free people makeup : Make up for dark blue eyes : Almay pure blends makeup.

Free People Makeup


free people makeup
    free people
  • free: people who are free; "the home of the free and the brave"
  • Free People is a women's clothing store operated by Urban Outfitters, which also operates the brand Anthropologie. The brand started out as an online shop only. As it grew in fame stores began to pop up everywhere.
    makeup
  • The combination of qualities that form a person's temperament
  • cosmetics applied to the face to improve or change your appearance
  • an event that is substituted for a previously cancelled event; "he missed the test and had to take a makeup"; "the two teams played a makeup one week later"
  • The composition or constitution of something
  • constitution: the way in which someone or something is composed
  • Cosmetics such as lipstick or powder applied to the face, used to enhance or alter the appearance
free people makeup - Monistat Soothing
Monistat Soothing Care Chafing Relief Powder-Gel, 1.5-Ounce Tube
Monistat Soothing Care Chafing Relief Powder-Gel, 1.5-Ounce Tube
This powder-gel provides on-the-go daily prevention and relief from chafing and skin irritation in intimate and delicate areas like the inner thigh, bikini area, under the arms and breasts. Made especially for women, the exclusive Powder-Gel formula combines the protective benefits of lotion and powder by forming a silky, breathable moisture-control barrier to fight friction; the breakthrough formula dries to a silky finish. Delicate skin feels healthy and protected from the uncomfortable irritation caused by moisture, heat, movement and shaving. Also helps reduce the appearance of redness that can develop after shaving or waxing the bikini area. Works with just one application and is gentle enough to use every day. Non-greasy, fragrance free, non-irritating and non-staining.
NOTE: This product is not intended to treat yeast infections.

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What Women Should Know About Makeup - Jet Magazine September 8, 1955
What Women Should Know About Makeup - Jet Magazine September 8, 1955
Click the "All Sizes" button above to read an article or to see the image clearly. These scans come from my rather large magazine collection. Instead of filling my house with old moldy magazines, I scanned them (in most cases, photographed them) and filled a storage area with moldy magazines. Now they reside on an external harddrive. I thought others might appreciate these tidbits of forgotten history. Please feel free to leave any comments or thoughts or impressions... Thanks in advance!
Free People Makeup Box
Free People Makeup Box
Inspired by the message on the back of the Free People catalog, to recycle it creatively! I collaged my makeup box with the catalog and some dried flowers :)

free people makeup
free people makeup
Taboo : Why Black Athletes Dominate Sports and Why We're Afraid to Talk About It
A sure-to-be-controversial argument, based on the latest scientific research, that blacks are inherently better athletesand a searing investigation into why were so uncomfortable with that conclusion.. Drawing on the latest scientific research, journalist Jon Entine makes an irrefutable case for black athletic superiority. We learn how scientists have used numerous, bogus scientific methods to prove that blacks were either more or less superior physically, and how racist scientists have often equated physical prowess with intellectual deficiency. Entine recalls the long, hard road to integration, both on the field and in society. And he shows why it isnt just being black that mattersit makes a huge difference as to where in Africa your ancestors are from. In virtually every sport in which they are given opportunity to compete, people of African descent dominate. East Africans own every distance running record. Professional sports in the Americas are dominated by men and women of West African descent. Why have blacks come to dominate sports? Are they somehow physically better? And why are we so uncomfortable when we discuss this?Drawing on the latest scientific research, journalist Jon Entine makes an irrefutable case for black athletic superiority. We learn how scientists have used numerous, bogus scientific methods to prove that blacks were either more or less superior physically, and how racist scientists have often equated physical prowess with intellectual deficiency. Entine recalls the long, hard road to integration, both on the field and in society. And he shows why it isnt just being black that mattersit makes a huge difference as to where in Africa your ancestors are from.Equal parts sports, science and examination of why this topic is so sensitive, Taboo is a book that will spark national debate.

Is there a genetic reason that African-Americans dominate professional sports? Even raising the question seems tantamount to heresy. Jon Entine not only raises the question, he strives to answer it in Taboo: Why Black Athletes Dominate Sports and Why We're Afraid to Talk About It.
Entine is no stranger to controversy, having worked with Tom Brokaw on the award-winning NBC News documentary Black Athletes: Fact and Fiction in 1989. He's also willing to ask tough questions--and come up with answers that anger people on all sides of the issue. Entine starts off with some statistics indicating that African-American athletes are disproportionately represented in professional sports: for example, 13 percent of the U.S. population is black, but the NFL is 65 percent black, the NBA is nearly 80 percent black, and the WNBA is 70 percent black. He also examines cultural issues, laying to rest the long-held idea that blacks excel in sports because it is the only avenue open for advancement.
Some scholars cry foul at the idea that blacks are physically gifted, seeing this as a subtle way of saying that they are therefore intellectually stunted. Entine carefully argues that historically athletic ability and intellectual prowess were linked--with a positive bias. The "dumb jock" stereotype is a relatively recent construct--perhaps a defensive mechanism that arose when blacks began to participate on a level playing field and gain prominence in the sporting world. There's no reason to suppose athleticism and intelligence are inversely related; Entine quotes respected sports reporter Frank Deford: "[W]hen Jack Nicklaus sinks a 30-foot putt, nobody thinks his IQ goes down." The issue of physical superiority is further complicated by fears that a genetic explanation results in a belief that blacks don't succeed because of hard work, dedication, and drive, but rather (in the words of Brooks Johnson, who doesn't believe Entine's claims) "because God just gave 'em the right gene."
Is the fear of sounding racist hindering legitimate scientific inquiry? Entine believes so, noting that, "Anyone who attempts to breach this taboo to study or even discuss what might be behind the growing performance gap between black and white athletes must be prepared to run a gauntlet of public scorn, survival not guaranteed." Taboo is destined to make most of its readers uncomfortable. Hopefully this discomfort will serve as a wedge to open up discussion of an issue too long avoided. --Sunny Delaney

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