WEST COAST REFRIGERATION. WEST COAST

West Coast Refrigeration. Amana Refrigerator Door.

West Coast Refrigeration


west coast refrigeration
    refrigeration
  • the process of cooling or freezing (e.g., food) for preservative purposes
  • (refrigerant) any substance used to provide cooling (as in a refrigerator)
  • deliberately lowering the body's temperature for therapeutic purposes; "refrigeration by immersing the patient's body in a cold bath"
    west coast
  • West Coast is a former New Zealand Parliamentary electorate, from 1972 to 1996.
  • The western seaboard of the US from Washington to California
  • the western seaboard of the United States from Washington to southern California
  • The West Coast (Maori: Te Tai Poutini) is one of the administrative regions of New Zealand, located on the west coast of the South Island, and is one of the more remote and most sparsely populated areas of the country. It is made up of three districts: Buller, Grey and Westland.
west coast refrigeration - Lucky Brand
Lucky Brand "West Coast BFF Necks" Gold-Tone Love Pendant Necklace
Lucky Brand "West Coast BFF Necks" Gold-Tone Love Pendant Necklace
The Lucky Brand "West Coast BFF Necks" Gold-Toned Love Pendant Necklace is a sweet accessory with a trendy bohemian look. The double-stranded necklace consists of two chains that can be worn separately or clipped together for a layered look. The gold-toned chains are antiqued with a light oxidized finish and accented with tiny flower charms on the side. One chain holds a delicate blue faceted stone pendant, while the other features an oval tag with "love" stamped on its surface. Measuring 17.75 inches, the chains each have a clasp and extender chain to customize their design and length. Keep one for yourself and give one to your best bud, so you can go out together in style.

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Entering Tombstone, Arizona
Entering Tombstone, Arizona
Tombstone is a city in Cochise County, Arizona, United States, founded in 1879 by Ed Schieffelin in what was then the Arizona Territory. According to 2006 Census Bureau estimates, the population of the city was 1,569. In the summer of 1877 prospector Ed Schieffelin was working the hills east of the San Pedro River in the southeast portion of the Arizona Territory, when he came across a vein of very rich silver ore in a high plateau called Goose Flats. When Schieffelin filed his mining claim he named it "The Tombstone", after a warning given him by a passing soldier. While telling the soldier about his rock collecting experiences, the soldier told him that the only rock he was likely to collect among the waterless hills and warring Apaches of the area would be his own tombstone. The town of Tombstone was founded in 1879, taking its name from the mining claim, and soon became a boomtown. Fueled by mineral wealth, Tombstone was a city of 1000 by the beginning of 1881, and within another year Tombstone had become the seat of a new county (Cochise County) with a population between 5,000 and 15,000, and services including refrigeration (with ice cream and later even ice skating), running water, telegraph and limited telephone service. Capitalists and businessmen moved in from the eastern U.S. Mining was carried out by immigrants from Europe, chiefly Ireland and Germany. An extensive service industry (laundry, construction, restaurants, hotels, etc.) was provided by Chinese and other immigrants. Without railroad access the increasingly sophisticated Tombstone was relatively isolated, deep in a Federal territory that was largely unpopulated desert and wilderness. Tombstone and its surrounding countryside also became known as one of the deadliest regions in the West. Uncivilized southern gangs from the surrounding countryside, known as "cow-boys", were at odds with the northern capitalists and immigrant miners who ran the city and mines. On October 26, 1881 this situation famously exploded in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, leading to a continued family and political feud that resulted in multiple deaths. On December 25, 1881 the Bird Cage Theater opened, and in 1882 the New York Times reported that "the Bird Cage Theatre is the wildest, wickedest night spot between Basin Street and the Barbary Coast."[3] Since Tombstone was in the desert, a company built a pipeline to supply the town with water. No sooner was this pipeline built than Tombstone's silver mines struck water. As a result of relative lack of water and quick wooden construction, Tombstone experienced major fires in June 1881 and May 1882. The second fire was particularly destructive and signaled the end of the classic old boomtown mining city. After the mid-1880s, when the silver mines had been tapped out, the main pump failed, causing many mines to be flooded with deep groundwater, and Tombstone declined rapidly. The U.S. census found it had fewer than 1900 residents in 1890, and fewer than 700 residents in 1900. The 1900 census was a minimum, however, and Tombstone was saved from becoming a ghost town after the decline of silver mining, partly by its status as the Cochise County seat. Even the county seat was later moved by popular vote to nearby Bisbee in 1929. However, the classic Cochise County Courthouse and adjacent gallows yard in Tombstone is preserved as a museum. Tombstone is home to perhaps the most famous graveyard of the Old West, Boot Hill. Buried at the site are various victims of violence and disease in Tombstone's early years, including those from the O.K. Corral. Boot Hill (also known as the old city cemetery) was also the destination for bad-men and those lynched or legally hanged in Tombstone. Admission to this historic site is free and donations are accepted. The lot in which the historic gunfight at the O.K. Corral occurred in 1881 is also preserved, but this has been walled off, and admission is charged. However, since much of this streetfight occurred in Tombstone's Fremont Street (modern Highway 80), much of this site is also viewable without admission charge. According to Guinness, the world's largest rosebush was planted in Tombstone in 1885 and still flourishes today in the city's sunny climate. This Lady Banksia rose now covers 8,000 square feet (740 m2) of the roof on an inn, and has a 12-foot (3.7 m) circumference trunk. Currently, tourism and western memorabilia are the main commercial enterprises; a July 2005 CNN article notes that Tombstone receives approximately 450,000 tourist visitors each year. This is about 300 tourists/year for each permanent resident. In contrast to its heyday, when it featured saloons open 24 hours and numerous houses of prostitution, Tombstone is now a staid community with few businesses open late. From 1957-1960, Tombstone received national attention through the ABC and later syndicated western television series Tombstone Territory starring Pat Conway
Profile of Ilo-ilo
Profile of Ilo-ilo
Iloilo is the largest province on Panay and occupies the fertile alluvial plains of the southeast. High mountains form natural boundaries with the provinces of Antique to the west and Capiz to the north. There are many small islands that lie along its irregular coast along the Guimaras Strait. There are two pronounced seasons, wet from July to November and dry from December to June. Determined to regain its position as the economic center of the Visayas, Iloilo is harnessing the potentials of its strategic location, abundant resources and established facilities to attain revitalized growth. Centrally located in the archipelago, Iloilo serves as the gateway to Southern Philippines and holds an unparalleled advantage of being a center of trade, commerce and industry. The province sprawls over a land area of 4,719 square kilometers and occupies the southeast end of Panay Island. Its population of 1.7 million provides not only a pool of highly skilled workforce but also a growing consumer market. Iloilo takes pride in being the "Food Basket and Rice Granary of the Philippines." Aside from being one of the leading producers of palay, its agricultural crops include various legumes, rootcrops and fruits like mangoes, pineapple and citrus. Iloilo’s fishing grounds are also some of the richest in the country and teem with grouper, sea bass, tuna, blue marlin, prawn, milkfish and shrimps. Iloilo also plays hosts to two research institutes, the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center and the University if the Philippines in the Visayas. The province also has rich deposits of metallic and non-metallic minerals.The province of Iloilo is only 50 minutes plane ride from Manila and is linked to many provinces by major shipping routes. The local road network has a length of 885 kilometers that reaches major production areas and market centers of the province. The Iloilo Commercial Port Complex is located on 20.8 hectares of land and is equipped with modern facilities and hosts a Fishing Port Complex. The fish port offers processing and storage facilities for the province’ thriving fishing industry. It is one of the country’s busiest ports; a fine natural harbor that has three entry points, two of which are utilized for domestic and international operations. The Iloilo airport has modern facilities that can handle both day and night time flights. Various airlines offer daily flight services to Cebu, Manila and other cities. The supply of power exceeds the current demands, while the supply of water is handled by 14 water districts spread throughout the province. Iloilo has state-of-the-art communication facilities that offer landline and mobile telephone services, and paging systems. The province is also one of the country’s major financial hubs with are 107 banking institutions and 101 financial intermediaries.The Regional Agro-Industrial Center (RAIC) in Pavia, is a special economic zone that already has the vital infrastructure facilities in place. Located approximately 10 kilometers from Iloilo airport, the RAIC could easily accommodate industries and businesses in gifts, toys and houseware items production garments manufacturing, metal products, machinery and equipment manufacturing, agriculture and aquamarine-based industries, electronics, and chemical product manufacturing. The Iloilo Fishing Port and Food Processing Complex has the facilities such as modern 300 tons cold storage room, refrigeration facilities and support systems that will allow investors to operate immediately. Other viable investment opportunities include the production and processing of shrimps, fin fishes, mussels and oysters, seaweeds and other fish products; production and processing of fruits, nuts, vegetables, pina fiber and other agricultural crops. Non-agricultural investment opportunities include production of furniture, metal craft, ceramics and earthenware, and marble. All of these have strong support from the growing local consumer market and established export markets. Land area: 4,767 sq. kms.; Major Dialects/ Languages:Ilonggo, Hiligaynon, Cebuano, Tagalog; No. of Barangays:1,901 City/ies: ILOILO; Municipalities: (42) Ajuy, Alimodian, Anilao, Badiangan, Balasan, Banate, Barotac Nuevo, Barotac Viejo, Batad, Bingawan, Cabatuan, Calinog, Carles, Concepcion, Dingle, Duenas, Dumangas, Estancia, Guimbal, Igbaras, Janiuay, Lambunao, Leganes, Lemery, Leon, Maasin, Miag-ao, Mina, New Lucena, Oton, Passi City, Pavia, Pototan, San Dionisio, San Enrique, San Joaquin, San Miguel, San Rafael, Sta. Barbara, Sara, Tigbauan, Tubungan, Zarraga.

west coast refrigeration
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