ITALIAN ICE FREEZERS - ICE FREEZERS

ITALIAN ICE FREEZERS - COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION TRAINING - COLD SPOT FREEZER.

Italian Ice Freezers


italian ice freezers
    italian ice
  • Italian ice, also known as water ice, is a frozen dessert made from either concentrated syrup flavoring or fruit purees. Italian ice is not shaved ice that is flavored; rather, it is made by the same process by which ice cream is made: mixing ingredients and pouring them into a batch freezer.
    freezers
  • A refrigerator is a cooling apparatus. The common household appliance (often called a "fridge" for short) comprises a thermally insulated compartment and a heat pump—chemical or mechanical means—to transfer heat from it to the external environment (i.e.
  • (Freezer (Pokemon)) Pokemon has 493 (as of Pokemon Diamond and Pearl) distinctive fictional species classified as the titular Pokemon.
  • A device for making frozen desserts such as ice cream or sherbet
  • A refrigerated compartment, cabinet, or room for preserving food at very low temperatures
  • (freezer) deep-freeze: electric refrigerator (trade name Deepfreeze) in which food is frozen and stored for long periods of time
italian ice freezers - Wyler's Authentic
Wyler's Authentic Italian Ice - 16 Pack of 2oz Freeze & Serve Bars
Wyler's Authentic Italian Ice - 16 Pack of 2oz Freeze & Serve Bars
Have you ever tasted authentic Italian Ice? Take a bite and close your eyes and you'd think you were in Little Italy! This 16 pack of freeze and serve Italian Ice bars contains an equal assortment of kiwi watermelon, raspberry, lemon, and orange creme. Made with real fruit juice, fat free and cholesterol free. You would think these would be in your local grocery store freezer, but chances are they're not, so get a box today and get ready to cool off! At only 50 calories per bar, your whole family can enjoy them!

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The Concrete Ship - The wreckage of SS Atlantus (commissioned in 1919, sunk in 1926)
The Concrete Ship - The wreckage of SS Atlantus (commissioned in 1919, sunk in 1926)
Sunset Beach in Cape May 7-5-09 Concrete ships are ships built of steel and ferrocement (reinforced concrete) instead of more traditional materials, such as steel or wood. The advantage of ferrocement construction is that materials are cheap and readily available, while the disadvantages are that construction labor costs are high, as are operating costs. (Ferrocement ships require thick hulls, which means extra mass to push and less space for cargo.) During the late 19th century, there were concrete river barges in Europe, and during both World War I and World War II, the US military ordered the construction of small fleets of ocean-going concrete ships. Few concrete ships were completed in time to see wartime service during World War I, but during 1944 and 1945, concrete ships and barges were used to support U.S. and British invasions in Europe and the Pacific. Since the late 1930s, there have also been ferrocement pleasure boats. History The oldest known ferrocement watercraft was a dinghy built by Joseph-Louis Lambot in Southern France in 1848. Lambot's boat was featured in the Exposition Universelle held in Paris in 1855. Beginning in the 1860s, ferrocement barges were built in Europe for use on canals, and around 1896, an Italian engineer, Carlo Gabellini, began building small ships out of ferrocement. The most famous of his ships was the Liguria.[1] Between 1908 and 1914, larger ferrocement barges began to be made in Germany, United Kingdom, [2] Holland, Norway, and California. [3] The remains of a British ship of this type, the auxiliary coaster Violette (built 1919), can be seen at Hoo, Kent, England.[4] On August 2, 1917, Nicolay Fougner of Norway launched the first self-propelled ferrocement ship intended for ocean travel. This was an 84-foot vessel of 400 tons named Namsenfjord. With the success of this ship, additional ferrocement vessels were ordered, and in October 1917, the U.S. government invited Fougner to head a study into the feasibility of building ferrocement ships in the United States.[5][6] About the same time, the California businessman W. Leslie Comyn took the initiative to build ferrocement ships on his own. He formed the San Francisco Ship Building Company (in Oakland, California), and hired Alan Macdonald and Victor Poss to design the first American ferrocement ship, a 6,125-ton steamer named the SS Faith. Faith was launched March 18, 1918. She cost $750,000 to build. She was used to carry bulk cargo for trade until 1921, when she was sold and scrapped as a breakwater in Cuba.[1] On April 12, 1918, President Woodrow Wilson approved the Emergency Fleet Corporation program which oversaw the construction of 24 ferrocement ships for the war. However, when the war ended in November 1918, only 12 ferrocement ships were under construction and none of them had been completed. These 12 ships were eventually completed, but soon sold to private companies who used them for light-trading, storage, and scrap.[1] Other countries that looked into ferrocement ship construction during this period included Canada, Denmark, Italy, Spain, Sweden[3] and the United Kingdom. Between the world wars, there was little commercial or military interest in concrete ship construction. The reason was that other shipbuilding methods were cheaper and less labor intensive, and other kinds of ships were cheaper to operate. However, in 1942, after the U.S. entered World War II, the U.S. military found that its contractors had steel shortages. Consequently, the U.S. government contracted McCloskey & Company[7] of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to build 24 self-propelled cement ships. Construction started in July 1943. The shipyard was at Hookers Point in Tampa, Florida, and at its peak, it employed 6,000 workers.[8] The U.S. government also contracted with two companies in California for the construction of concrete barge ships.[8] Barge ships were large vessels that lacked engines to propel them. Instead, they were towed by tugs. In Europe, ferro cement barges (FCBs) played a crucial role in World War II operations, particularly in the D-Day Normandy landings, where they were used as part of the Mulberry harbour defenses, for fuel and munitions transportation, and as floating pontoons. Some were fitted with engines and used as mobile canteens and troop carriers. Some of these vessels survive as abandoned wrecks in the Thames Estuary; two remain in civil use as moorings at Westminster. One notable wartime FCB, previously beached at Canvey Island, was destroyed by vandals on May 22, 2003.[9] Concrete barges also served in the Pacific during 1944 and 1945.[10] From the Charleroi, Pennsylvania, Mail, February 5, 1945: “ Largest unit of the Army's fleet is a BRL, (Barge, Refrigerated, Large) which is going to the South Pacific to serve fresh frozen foods – even ice cream – to troops weary of dry rations. The vessel can keep 64 carloads of frozen meats and 500 tons of fresh produce indefinitely at 12F. Equipmen
gelato
gelato
Gelato, or the plural Gelati, is Italian ice cream made from a liquid, milk or water; a solid, sugar, fats or sweeteners; flavorings, pastes, fruit powders; stabilizers, guar gum, locust bean, etc.; emulsifiers, mono- and digylcerides; and air. The process in which gelato is made varies on the ingredients used as it can be made using a hot process, which includes pasteurization or as a cold process which doesn't require pasteurization. Both processes require a gelato batch freezer, which makes the end product by mixing the ingredients and incorporating air. Like high-end ice cream, gelato generally has less than 55% air, resulting in a denser and more flavorful product.

italian ice freezers
italian ice freezers
Whynter ICM-15LS Ice Cream Maker, Stainless Steel
With the WHYNTER ICM-15LS stainless steel frozen dessert ice cream maker, you can make a spread of delectable desserts in about 30-40 minutes. This versatile self –freezing ice cream maker allows you to not only make premium ice cream but also refreshing sorbets, Italian gelato, sherbets, fresh frozen yogurts and other treats. Our professional standard ice-cream maker offers premium features not found in budget ice cream makers. A built-in powerful compressor freezer allows for continuous use without the inconvenience of having to pre-freeze the mixing bowl. Not only is it so much easier, it also tastes a whole lot better. The gorgeous stainless steel exterior and soft touch LCD control panel will make this your favorite kitchen electric. You will never again have to wait hours or use any freezer space before being able to make your favorite frozen dessert. This unit includes an electronic timer, temperature display, ice cream scoop, and we'll even send you some secret recipes!

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