CONTRACTORS MEASURING WHEEL - CONTRACTORS MEASURING

Contractors Measuring Wheel - Purple Rota Wheels.

Contractors Measuring Wheel


contractors measuring wheel
    measuring wheel
  • A piece of field equipment designed to measure distances; generally composed of a small wheel and calibrated meter mounted on the end of a handle
    contractors
  • A person or company that undertakes a contract to provide materials or labor to perform a service or do a job
  • (contract) a binding agreement between two or more persons that is enforceable by law
  • (contract bridge) the highest bid becomes the contract setting the number of tricks that the bidder must make
  • (contract) enter into a contractual arrangement
contractors measuring wheel - Keson RRT12
Keson RRT12 Top Reading Center Line Measuring Wheel
Keson RRT12 Top Reading Center Line Measuring Wheel
The RRT12 offers a counter reset on the handle and on the unit housing. No more beding over, lifing the wheel or stepping on it to reset it to zero. Additionally, the reset on the housing is reinforced to protect it when resetting the counter with your foot. The brake on the pistol grip stops counting instantly. Stop adding lengths accidently by putting the brake on exactly when you need it. The collapsing hinge snaps into extended lock with the flick of a wrist and it disconnects if you forget to press the unlock trigger. Center line handle design with counter balance of top of the wheel aligns for perfect balance. This makes measuring easier and more accurate. Compact fold down allows the wheel to easily reduce to 1/2 its size for storage and portability. The flip down kickstand keeps the wheel upright when you need your hands free to perform other tasks and stays out of the way as you measure. Gear and shaft transmisssion for highest measurement accuracy and strength. No belts to stretch or fail. Lock your handle in place when you're not using the wheel. Our clamp protects the extension hinge from breaking.

83% (19)
gaula river
gaula river
chorgalia OF CHORGALIA, O. HENRY AND A RIVER ABUSED Rajshekhar Pant Woven round a small village with the name Lakeland -“situated on a low spur of Cumberland range of mountains on a little tributary of the Clinch river” –there is a rather lesser talked about story of O Henry ‘The Church With An Overshot Wheel’. It is the story of a “contended village of two dozen houses situated on a forlorn, narrow-gauge railroad line” which, having lost itself in the neighbouring woods “ran into Lakelands from fright and loneliness.” O Henry never visited Chorgalia- a small village on the foot of rather less prominent Shivaliks in the Kumaon Himalayas, close to the foothill city of Haldwani –and yet all that he wrote for Lakelands is equally true to Chorgalia. “There are no lakes, and you wonder again why it was named Lakelands” and Chorgalia also never had the reputation of being the ‘corridor of thieves’. A somnolent settlement on a submontane road, right at the mouth of a pass where the river Nandhor debouches from hills on to the open country of ‘Bhabar’, it in the early British days happened to be the only irrigated pocket in the entire eastern Bhabar region that now constitutes the grain bowel of the state of Uttarakhand. Waters of Nandhor splashing the verdant Shivaliks on one side have been brought to the gradually widening expanse of green fields on the other through numerous channels still constituting the lifeline of Chorgalia and scores of other settlements that have cropped round it over he decades. The rich flora and fauna it harboured round its banks, the alluvial soil it would invariably bring in rains and off-load at the paddy-fields, the rich piscine-stock it once had and the sustenance it gave to those who chose to settle, live and die along its course –had earned for it a motherly respect and affection. Janki Devi a septuagenarian still remembers the halcyon days, when ritual worship was offered to ‘Jhupua’ the local river-god to protect the village from the wrath of flash-floods that at times would sweep the new cultivation along the banks of the river. No one worships ‘Jhupua’ now. Nandhor –the bestower as it is, has now earned the reputation of being a harbinger of direct prosperity and that too in terms of cash, -thanks to the efforts put-up by the Government departments and a handful of high-ups in Chorgalia. The fear of floods is best exploited here to bring a windfall of annual govt grants for building boulder spurs, retentions, bank pitching, revetments and a host of other flood control measures which are often swept away in the first flush of monsoon. The river is abused right left and in the centre for the whole year to be used for petty personal gains. In the past ten years around Rs 250 millions have reportedly been spent by departments like Watershed Management, Forest and Irrigation in the name of flood control in a stretch of a few Km downstream from the point called Machali-Bandh at Chorgaluia. At Machali Bandh, located parallel to the Chorgalia market towards the Shivalik range at a distance of around half a km from Sitarganj highway, which bisects the settlement, the bed of the river widens suddenly and starts bifurcating itself into two distributaries by the name Kailash and Devaha. Flowing close to the easterly flanks of the Shivalik for a couple of Km Devaha finally feeds the Nanaksagar Dam while Kailash eventually joins Ramganga near Shajahanpur. For the past few decades much of the water of Nandhor has been flowing towards Kailash side, offloading the gravel and sand towards the Devaha. Old-timers of Chorgalia say that it is the normal course as the river has a history of shifting in its bed (which widens gradually as it flows downstream) towards one side or the other in an interval of ten to twelve years. The bed of Nandhor -falling within the precincts of reserve forest -has been encroached upon by the new settlers in connivance with the corrupt govt officials and politicians. “Upholding the cause of these encroachers” says Dr GC Sharma an archaeologist and painter of repute from Chorgalia, “the govt officials make huge proposals every year and the politicians ensure that they are cleared well in time.” It is interesting to note that over Rs three crores have reportedly been spent in pre-monsoon season in previous years in erecting boulder-spurs, wire craters and retentions etc in and around Machli-Bandh area alone. For the said taming of Nandhor river at the same spot and a few villages downstream in Chorgalia region itself, (like Kutaliya, Pachonia, Sunardhara, Aamkheda etc) projects worth over Rs Seven Crores are reported to have been sent to the govt for sanctioning. “To the recurring benefits of a handful of contractors in league with politicians the government keeps on spending large sums of public-funds leaving the banks further expanded and barren enough for the lobby of the same contractors and their mentors to exploit the situation the next year,” says Ra
Canon de 75 modèle 1897
Canon de 75 modèle 1897
was a quick-firing field artillery piece adopted in March 1898 after 5 years of research and secret trials. It saw widespread service in World War I including in the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF). It also served during World War II in various but more limited capacities. It was commonly known as the French 75, simply the 75 and Soixante-Quinze (French for 75). Its official French designation was: Materiel de 75mm Mle 1897. It introduced, for the first time in the history of field artillery, a hydro-pneumatic long recoil mechanism which kept the gun's trail and wheels perfectly still during the firing sequence. Since it did not need to be re-aimed after each shot, the French 75 could deliver fifteen rounds per minute on its target, either shrapnel or high-explosive, up to about 5 miles (8,500 meters) away. The French 75 was entirely researched, developed and manufactured at State-controlled arsenals, principally at Atelier de Construction de Puteaux (APX) near Paris for its hydro-pneumatic recoil mechanism. Other parts of the gun were sub-contracted to other arsenals including MAS (an abbreviation of Manufacture d'Armes St. Etienne ) Tarbes and Bourges. It is not to be confused with the Schneider manufactured "Canon de 75mm Mle 1912" used by French cavalry and the Serbian army, and its 1914 modification. Although they used the original French 75's ammunition, these privately manufactured Schneider guns were lighter, smaller, and mechanically different The French artillery entered the war in August 1914 with more than 4,000 Mle 1897 75mm field guns (1,000 batteries of 4 guns each). Each Mle 1897 75mm field gun battery (4 guns) was manned by highly trained crews led by 4 officers recruited among graduates of engineering schools. Enlisted men from the countryside took care of the 6 horses that pulled each gun and its first limber. Another 6 horses pulled each additional limber and caisson which were assigned to each gun. A battle ready French 75 battery was manned by 170 men led by 4 officers. It included 160 horses, most of them pulling ammunition as well as repair and supply caissons. Over 17,500 Mle 1897 75mm field guns were produced during World War I, over and above the 4,100 French 75's which were already deployed by the French Army in August 1914. All the essential parts, including the gun's barrel and the oleo-pneumatic recoil mechanisms were manufactured by French State arsenals: Puteaux, Bourges, Chatellerault and St Etienne. A truck-mounted anti-aircraft version of the French 75 was assembled by the automobile firm of De Dion-Bouton and adopted in 1913. The total production of 75mm shells during World War I exceeded 200 million rounds, mostly by private industry. In order to ramp-up shell production from 20,000 rounds per day to 100,000 in 1915, the government turned to civilian contractors and, as a result, shell quality deteriorated. This led to an epidemic of burst barrels which afflicted 75mm artillery during 1915. Colonel Sainte-Claire Deville confronted the crisis ( leaky microfissures in the bases of the shells, due to shortcuts in manufacturing ) and the problems were corrected. Shell quality came back by September 1915, but never to the full exacting standards of pre-war manufacture. The French 75 gave its best performances during the Battle of the Marne in August-September 1914 and at Verdun in 1916. The contribution of 75mm artillery in these two battles, and thus to the French victories that ensued, was perceived at the time as quantitatively important.[citation needed] In the case of Verdun, over 1,000 French 75's (250 batteries) were constantly in action, night and day, on the battlefield during a period of nearly nine months. The total consumption of 75mm shells at Verdun during the period February 21 to September 30, 1916, is documented by the public record at Service Historique de l'Armee de Terre to have been in excess of 16 million rounds, or nearly 70% of all shells fired by French artillery during that battle. The French 75 was a devastating anti-personnel weapon against waves of infantry attacking in the open, as at the Marne and Verdun. However its shells were comparatively light and lacked the power to obliterate trench works, concrete bunkers and deeply buried shelters. Thus, eventually, the French 75 batteries became routinely used to cut corridors, with high-explosive shells, across the belts of German barbed wire. Finally, after 1916, the 75 batteries became the carriers of choice to deliver toxic gas shells, including mustard gas and phosgene. The French Army had to wait until 1917 to receive the modern heavy field artillery (e.g. the 155 mm Schneider howitzer and the long range Canon de 155mm GPF) that was virtually absent in 1914. In the meantime it had to do with the old de Bange 155mm converted siege artillery, without recoil brakes, that was inferior in rate of fire and mobility to the more modern and numerous German heavy artillery. The excessive rel

contractors measuring wheel
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