WIRELESS FLOOD LIGHTS : WIRELESS FLOOD

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Wireless Flood Lights


wireless flood lights
    flood lights
  • (Flood light) Gas-discharge lamps are a family of artificial light sources that generate light by sending an electrical discharge through an ionized gas, i.e. a plasma.
  • (FLOOD LIGHT) A lighting unit for projecting a broad beam of light. Used in parking lots, sports fields, and other area lighting applications.
  • (Flood Light) A luminaire consisting of a reflector, lamp, and sometimes a single lens, used to direct a large amount of light on a relatively large area.
    wireless
  • Lacking or not requiring wires
  • having no wires; "a wireless security system"
  • transmission by radio waves
  • radio: medium for communication

Proboscis
Proboscis
The difference between this picture and the one that follows it in my photostream is that this one was taken first. I wasn't sure how tolerant the butterfly would be of having me so close to it and then having a flash go off, so the flash power output was dialed down for this shot. This resulted in the background not really showing up and the picture coming out a bit dark overall. A larger aperture was used in this shot as opposed to the other, resulting in a shallower depth of field. The other picture is arguably slightly better, as the depth of field is a bit greater, but the plane of focus is slightly off. While the majority of the butterfly's main body is slightly blurred here, the proboscis is sharply in focus. I found its overall "texture" and its coils to be rather interesting. Given that it's something we don't usually pay attention to, it's the reason this picture is being posted up in spite of the other one. The rest of the text is identical between both pictures: This was taken at the Museum of Natural History's live butterfly exhibit in New York. The exhibit had a single walking path that was flooded with people, and there were only a few downward-facing light sources. Lighting overall was poor, and it was difficult to approach butterflies from many angles or to get close to them. This particular butterfly was sitting on a leaf that was hanging over the walking path slightly, and so I was able to get very close to it. (It was likely either very tired, shell-shocked, or tamed, as it didn't fly away). In order to achieve this level of magnification with my equipment (the Zuiko Digital 50mm macro lens mounted to the Olympus EX-25 extension tube) I manually adjusted the focus out as far as it would go, and then moved until the image appeared to be in focus. I was likely well under two inches away from the butterfly. My swaying back and forth, combined with the shallow depth of field that results from this working distance, is what explains the difference in focus between the two pictures. Janelle held my flash unit (Olympus FL-50R) and aimed it at the butterfly; I believe she was to my left for this picture. The flash was bare, with no gels or diffusers used. If I could redo this picture, I'd consider increasing the flash output and using an even smaller aperture (somewhere in the f/18 to f/22 range) so as to greatly increase the depth of field. Shot with an Olympus E-520, Zuiko Digital 50mm macro lens, EX-25 extension tube, and Olympus FL-50R flash unit. The flash was triggered wirelessly and held off to the left of the camera, pointed at the butterfly. This was shot hand-held with IS mode 1 enabled. No cropping was performed to this image, but the maximum image resolution has been scaled down for upload. This is a RAW image that has not been subject to any post-processing.
Proboscis: Backdrop
Proboscis: Backdrop
The butterfly had proven that it was relatively gutsy. Whereas I'd used a lower power setting on the flash in the first picture, I set the flash to +/- 0 TTL here and also decreased the aperture size, so as to increase the depth of field. Unfortunately, the decreased aperture didn't make a terribly large difference, and I also swayed back a bit such that the focal plane didn't capture as many interesting things as I'd hoped (particularly the proboscis). There's a bit more color in this picture, though, and it looks a bit less like something out of a horror film compared to the first. The rest of the text is identical between both pictures: This was taken at the Museum of Natural History's live butterfly exhibit in New York. The exhibit had a single walking path that was flooded with people, and there were only a few downward-facing light sources. Lighting overall was poor, and it was difficult to approach butterflies from many angles or to get close to them. This particular butterfly was sitting on a leaf that was hanging over the walking path slightly, and so I was able to get very close to it. (It was likely either very tired, shell-shocked, or tamed, as it didn't fly away). In order to achieve this level of magnification with my equipment (the Zuiko Digital 50mm macro lens mounted to the Olympus EX-25 extension tube) I manually adjusted the focus out as far as it would go, and then moved until the image appeared to be in focus. I was likely well under two inches away from the butterfly. My swaying back and forth, combined with the shallow depth of field that results from this working distance, is what explains the difference in focus between the two pictures. Janelle held my flash unit (Olympus FL-50R) and aimed it at the butterfly; I believe she was to my left for this picture. The flash was bare, with no gels or diffusers used. If I could redo this picture, I'd consider increasing the flash output and using an even smaller aperture (somewhere in the f/18 to f/22 range) so as to greatly increase the depth of field. Shot with an Olympus E-520, Zuiko Digital 50mm macro lens, EX-25 extension tube, and Olympus FL-50R flash unit. The flash was triggered wirelessly and held off to the left of the camera, pointed at the butterfly. This was shot hand-held with IS mode 1 enabled. No cropping was performed to this image, but the maximum image resolution has been scaled down for upload. This is a camera-derived JPEG that has not received any additional post-processing. The following settings were used on-camera: contrast, saturation, and sharpness at +1; "vivid" color scheme; white balance set to auto.

wireless flood lights
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