INVESTING IN NATURAL GAS COMPANIES - NATURAL GAS COMPANIES

Investing in natural gas companies - Magic johnson investment.

Investing In Natural Gas Companies


investing in natural gas companies
    gas companies
  • (gas company) a public utility that provides gas
  • (Gas Company) every person owning, leasing, maintaining, operating, managing or controlling mains, pipes or other fixtures for the transmission or distribution of gas for sale within the state, or engaged in the manufacture of gas for distribution except a municipal gas utility.
    investing
  • (invest) make an investment; "Put money into bonds"
  • Expend money with the expectation of achieving a profit or material result by putting it into financial schemes, shares, or property, or by using it to develop a commercial venture
  • (invest) endow: give qualities or abilities to
  • the act of investing; laying out money or capital in an enterprise with the expectation of profit
  • Devote (one's time, effort, or energy) to a particular undertaking with the expectation of a worthwhile result
  • Buy (something) whose usefulness will repay the cost
investing in natural gas companies - Oil and
Oil and Gas Royalties
Oil and Gas Royalties
With our nation's supply of domestic oil and gas reserves in decline, the frantic search for new supplies in previously unexplored areas means some landowners may share in sales proceeds. This short ebook provides just enough detail that anyone not familiar with the industry can still gain a working knowledge of the process.

If I suddenly find one day that I am now one of the fortunate few who have become a royalty owner, what can I expect?

Yes, companies are required by law to furnish royalty owners with certain information in a prescribed format, yet pitfalls for the unwary often still remain.

The author worked in the oil and gas industry for more than 40 years in a variety of capacities. His specialty was in the revenue and royalty disbursement area.

This short article by no means tells you everything that you may need to know concerning what it means to be a royalty owner, but it offers a concise explanation that arms the reader with at least a working knowledge of the basics.

Even if you never expect to be a royalty owner, read it to increase your knowledge of the subject. Or, just simply read it for entertainment value...

With our nation's supply of domestic oil and gas reserves in decline, the frantic search for new supplies in previously unexplored areas means some landowners may share in sales proceeds. This short ebook provides just enough detail that anyone not familiar with the industry can still gain a working knowledge of the process.

If I suddenly find one day that I am now one of the fortunate few who have become a royalty owner, what can I expect?

Yes, companies are required by law to furnish royalty owners with certain information in a prescribed format, yet pitfalls for the unwary often still remain.

The author worked in the oil and gas industry for more than 40 years in a variety of capacities. His specialty was in the revenue and royalty disbursement area.

This short article by no means tells you everything that you may need to know concerning what it means to be a royalty owner, but it offers a concise explanation that arms the reader with at least a working knowledge of the basics.

Even if you never expect to be a royalty owner, read it to increase your knowledge of the subject. Or, just simply read it for entertainment value...

79% (12)
Mansion Riverside
Mansion Riverside
Mansion located next to the Des Plaines river Riverside IL. Riverside is arguably one of the first planned communities in the United States, designed in 1869 by Frederick Law Olmsted. The village was incorporated in 1875 and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1970. In 1863 the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad was built heading southwest from downtown Chicago to Quincy, Illinois, passing through what is now the Near West Suburban area of Chicago in a western-southwestern direction. This new access to transportation and commerce brought about a significant housing and construction boom in what was once farmland far from the bustle of the city of Chicago. In 1868, an eastern businessman named Emery E. Childs brought together a group of associates to form the Riverside Improvement Company with the intent of purchasing and investing in land in the form of residential development. They turned to the economically booming Chicago area where they purchased a 1,600-acre (6.5 km?) tract of property along the Des Plaines River and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad line. The site was highly desirable due to its natural oak-hickory forest and its mere 11 mile distance from the Chicago Loop. Further, its position along the winding Des Plaines River cooled the area, and due to good drainage, the land was mosquito free. The Riverside Improvement Company commissioned well-known landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted and his partner, Calvert Vaux, to design a "rural" bedroom community. Olmsted and Vaux had already received widespread acclaim and fame for their design of New York City's Central Park. The Improvement Company wanted Riverside to combine the pleasures of suburban living with urban conveniences such as community-provided gas, water services, and maintained streets. Olmsted and Vaux went one step further in that regard. Instead of planning the community's streets in a grid fashion as Chicago and most of its suburbs at the time were, they planned the streets to follow the area's natural contours. Streets follow the Des Plaines River, and continue from there to wind all through the Village. The town's plan, which was completed in 1869, also accorded for a Grand Park system that uses several large parks as a foundation, with 41 smaller triangular parks and plazas located at intersections throughout town to provide for additional green spaces. Olmsted's reputation, plus the lovely curvilinear streets, open spaces, and attractive village center they designed for Riverside, attracted Chicago's elite. By the fall of 1871 a number of large, expensive houses were occupied or under construction and an elegant hotel had opened. Unfortunately for the developers, the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 drained away both construction crews and capital from the village. The financial Panic of 1873 compounded the company's troubles and it went bankrupt. The demise of the improvement company brought new construction nearly to a halt for some time. A village government was established in September 1875 and Olmsted's original development plan remained in force. In 1893 several wealthy local residents formed an association and opened the Riverside Golf Club, one of the oldest golf clubs in the Chicago area. Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, William Le Baron Jenney, and several other prominent local architects drew the plans for houses that still stand in the village. A striking Chateauesque Village Hall was built in 1895, and in 1901 the Burlington line constructed a charming brick railroad station.
Let's pursue alternatives.
Let's pursue alternatives.
An oil well pump in Colorado. These are called "horse heads" or "grasshoppers" by many. It's a shame that the oil companies have such a strong lobby and that our politicians are so beholden to them. T. Boone Pickens recently ask Congress for money to develop liquefied natural gas distribution and to develop cars that use it. The cost per mile driven would be about 25% of that of petroleum. Plus it's a lot cleaner. Plus the US has 250 years worth of the stuff. When the gas lobby heard about this they descended on congress like geese coming in for a landing. Needless to say, congress mysteriously decided not to help. I don't believe in subsidies but since the oil industry gets so much help (the highway system, for example), then T. Boone should have gotten some help, too. And the other alternatives like solar, wind, etc. Think of what the US could do if they were NOT dependent on foreign oil. We could invest in renewable in a big way. Using natural gas seems like a good way to do that. Regardless, the market should decide, not the lobbyist. I suspect they are also fighting against electric cars! A sensible energy policy would optimize the use of all. (BTW, electric cars must be charged with electricity which is generated from coal, nuclear, gas, or hydro plants. Most energy experts feel that natural gas is an important component in overall power generation because it's easily turned on and off to handle peak demand periods. Wind and solar are less reliable but have the advantage of being really clean. Keep in mind that the US still produces a lot of oil which is sold on the open market and these companies still make a lot of money. They have a lot of incentive to resists newer or better technologies and sources.... Can't we let these sources/technologies compete on a more level playing field without the backroom deals between campaign contributors and sleazy politicians (of both parties). Note: I accidentally had the white balance set to fluorescent when I took this. I liked the effect, though and decided to keep it.

investing in natural gas companies
investing in natural gas companies
The Canine Adventures of a Gas Meter Reader
You've heard the story of the mail man getting bit by a dog ... always good for a laugh. But what if the mailman decided to fight back? This is the gritty first-person account of a gas meter reader in Los Angeles and his daily engagements with the canine species. This semi-autobiographical account is told through visceral pen and ink drawings, accompanied by text hammered out on a broken-down typewriter. It is a darkly humorous and revealing account living somewhere between Charles Bukowski's "Post Office" and "In Me Own Words: The Autobiography of Bigfoot." The author and illustrator is a Los Angeles based artist, graduate of CalArts character animation program, who has happily moved back to full-time art making since creating this book.

You've heard the story of the mail man getting bit by a dog ... always good for a laugh. But what if the mailman decided to fight back? This is the gritty first-person account of a gas meter reader in Los Angeles and his daily engagements with the canine species. This semi-autobiographical account is told through visceral pen and ink drawings, accompanied by text hammered out on a broken-down typewriter. It is a darkly humorous and revealing account living somewhere between Charles Bukowski's "Post Office" and "In Me Own Words: The Autobiography of Bigfoot." The author and illustrator is a Los Angeles based artist, graduate of CalArts character animation program, who has happily moved back to full-time art making since creating this book.

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