TWIG OUTDOOR FURNITURE : OUTDOOR FURNITURE

Twig Outdoor Furniture : Modus Furniture Quality

Twig Outdoor Furniture


twig outdoor furniture
    outdoor furniture
  • Beach Chairs Garden Sets Outdoor Tables Garden Chairs
  • Garden furniture, also called patio furniture and outdoor furniture, is a type of furniture specifically designed for outdoor use. It is typically made of weather resistant materials. The oldest surviving examples of garden furniture were found in the gardens of Pompeii.
    twig
  • branch out in a twiglike manner; "The lightning bolt twigged in several directions"
  • catch on: understand, usually after some initial difficulty; "She didn't know what her classmates were plotting but finally caught on"
  • Understand or realize something
  • branchlet: a small branch or division of a branch (especially a terminal division); usually applied to branches of the current or preceding year
  • Perceive; observe
twig outdoor furniture - Making Twig
Making Twig Garden Furniture 2 Ed
Making Twig Garden Furniture 2 Ed
Home gardens have become increasingly important both for socializing and for retreating from the hectic pace of modern life. In Making Twig Garden Furniture, Abby Ruoff shows how to embellish these spaces with everything from simple birdhouses and planters to elaborate benches and trellises - all made from twigs and bentwood. Now in its second edition and greatly expanded, the book introduces 10 new unique designs, and 61 projects altogether. Complete plans for all projects are included, with skill levels ranging from beginner to expert. Old favorites cover both the startling (Scarecrow) and the serene (Robin's Nesting House). New projects include a Revamped Red Rocker, a Rustic Plant Trainer, and a Canopy Bench with a Bluestone Seat. Designs such as the Herb Gathering Basket and the Picnic Cover (to protect outside meals) will inspire readers to bring back some charming but useful traditions.

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Gypsy Moth
Gypsy Moth
Aperture- F4.3 Focal length- 60 mm Shutter speed- 1/200 sec. ISO- 250 The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, is a moth in the family Lymantriidae of Eurasian origin. Originally ranging from Europe to Asia, it was introduced to North America in the late 1860s and has been expanding its range ever since. Gypsy moth egg masses are typically laid on branches and trunks of trees, but egg masses may be found in any sheltered location. During outbreaks they have been known to fly to ships in port and lay their eggs on the ships. Four to six weeks later, embryos develop into larvae. The egg is the overwintering stage. After an acclimation stage, eggs can withstand freezing temperatures. The longer they are chilled in winter, the less heating is required for their hatch in spring. The hatching of gypsy moth eggs coincides with budding of most hardwood trees. Larvae (caterpillars) emerge from egg masses from early spring through mid-May. Gypsy moths are dispersed in two ways. Natural dispersal occurs when newly hatched larvae hanging from host trees on silken threads are carried by the wind for a distance of up to about 1 mile, although most go less than 50 meters. The larvae reach maturity between mid-June and early July. They enter the pupal stage. This is the stage during which larvae change into adults or moths. Pupation lasts from 7 to 14 days. The brown male gypsy moth emerges first, flying in rapid zigzag patterns searching for females. The male gypsy moths are active throughout night and even daytime as well, unlike most moths, which are only nocturnal. Gypsy moths (at least of the introduced American population) fly all day and night, with the possible exception of the late morning. They are most active soon after dusk and in the latter hours of the night. The gypsy moth was introduced into the United States in 1868 by a French scientist, Leopold Trouvelot, living in Medford, Massachusetts. The native silk spinning caterpillars were proving to be susceptible to disease. So Trouvelot brought over gypsy moth eggs to try to make a caterpillar hybrid, that could resist diseases. When some of the moths escaped from his lab, they found suitable habitat and started to multiply. Gypsy moth is now one of the most notorious pests of hardwood trees in the eastern United States. The first outbreak there occurred in 1889. By 1987, the gypsy moth had established itself throughout the northeast USA and southern Quebec and Ontario. The insect has spread south into Virginia and West Virginia, and west into Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. Small, isolated infestations have also occurred sporadically in Utah, Oregon, Washington, California and British Columbia, but these have all been successfully eradicated. Since 1980, the gypsy moth has defoliated over 1 million acres (4,000 km?) of forest each year. In 1981, a record 12.9 million acres (52,200 km?) were defoliated. This is an area larger than Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and Connecticut combined. In wooded suburban areas, during periods of infestation when trees are visibly defoliated, gypsy moth larvae crawl up and down walls, across roads, over outdoor furniture, and even inside homes. During periods of feeding they leave behind a mixture of small pieces of leaves and frass, or excrement. During outbreaks, the sound of chewing and frass dropping is a continual annoyance. This phenomenon sounds eerily like a light to moderate rain. Gypsy moth populations usually remain at very low levels, but occasionally increase to very high levels which can result in partial to total defoliation of host trees for 1–3 years. Gypsy moth larvae generally prefer oaks, but may feed on several hundred different species of trees and shrubs, both hardwood and conifer. In the East the gypsy moth prefers oaks, aspen, apples, sweetgum, speckled alder, basswood, gray and paper birch, poplars, willows, and hawthorns, although other species are also affected. The list of hosts will undoubtedly expand as the insect spreads south and west. The gypsy moth avoids ash trees, tulip-tree, American sycamore, butternut, black walnut, catalpa, flowering dogwood, balsam fir, cedar, American holly, and shrubs such as mountain laurel and rhododendrons, but will feed on these in late instars when densities are extremely high. Older larvae feed on several species of hardwood that younger larvae avoid, including cottonwood, hemlock, Atlantic white cypress, and the pines and spruces native to the East. The effects of defoliation depend primarily on the amount of foliage that is removed, the condition of the tree at the time it is defoliated, the number of consecutive defoliations, available soil moisture, and the species of host. If less than 50 percent of their crown is defoliated, most hardwoods will experience only a slight reduction (or loss) in radial growth. If more than 50 percent of their crown is defoliated, most hardwoods will refoliate or produce a second flush of foliage by midsummer. Healthy trees
Twig and the Lady Bug
Twig and the Lady Bug
Kelly and I traveled to Scarborough Faire today and spent a wonderful afternoon wandering around enjoying the festivities. It was truly like walking through a time warp seeing so many different people in costume. I'm not sure who was having more fun, those visiting or those who were all decked out in regalia. Above is the infamous "Twig" the fairy. She is a professional renaissance person who travels to the different faires throughout the country. She even has her own website, but of course. Of all the people I have seen there in the last several years, she is by far the most interesting and entertaining for young and old. Captured with: D80, 70-200mm @ f/3.2, 1/250, ISO 400, 125mm. Of note, my D700 was involved in a mishap involving asphalt and has been shipped to the Nikon hospital for repair.....it will be sorely missed for awhile I suspect.

twig outdoor furniture
twig outdoor furniture
Rustic Garden Furniture & Accessories: Making Chairs, Planters, Birdhouses, Gates & More
Rustic woodworking is a hot topic, and a technique that continues to attract both novice and experienced craftspeople. Through thirty attractive outdoor projects, two experts in this traditional art teach the pleasures of working with sticks, twigs, and other found wood. No experience is required to construct many of the pieces, and the many illustrations and color photos provide help throughout the process. A beginner could easily make the simple woven twig birdhouse. The Birch Bark Planter Folding Twig Screen adds decorative flair to a porch or deck. Other favorites include an Adirondack Chair, a Rustic Loveseat for Two, and a beautiful Diamond Rose Trellis.

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