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west houston attorney
    attorney
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  • A person appointed to act for another in business or legal matters
  • In the United States, a lawyer; one who advises or represents others in legal matters as a profession; An agent or representative authorized to act on someone else's behalf
    houston
  • An inland port in Texas, linked to the Gulf of Mexico by the Houston Ship Canal; pop. 1,953,631. Since 1961, it has been a center for space research and manned space flight; it is the site of the NASA Space Center
  • the largest city in Texas; located in southeastern Texas near the Gulf of Mexico; site of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
  • United States politician and military leader who fought to gain independence for Texas from Mexico and to make it a part of the United States (1793-1863)
  • Houston is the fourth-largest city in the United States of America and the largest city in the state of Texas. As of the 2009 U.S. Census estimate, the city had a population of 2.3 million within an area of .
    west
  • The western part of the world or of a specified country, region, or town
  • situated in or facing or moving toward the west
  • The direction toward the point of the horizon where the sun sets at the equinoxes, on the left-hand side of a person facing north, or the part of the horizon lying in this direction
  • The compass point corresponding to this
  • the countries of (originally) Europe and (now including) North America and South America
  • to, toward, or in the west; "we moved west to Arizona"; "situated west of Boston"
west houston attorney - Jagged Rocks
Jagged Rocks of Wisdom: Professional Advice for the New Attorney
Jagged Rocks of Wisdom: Professional Advice for the New Attorney
A new job is scary for anyone. A new job as an attorney is scary times two: the challenges are both substantive (as in actually knowing the law), as well as procedural (as in knowing how to act like an attorney). In this professional transition, many new attorneys fall by the wayside. This book is a guide to keep the new attorney on track. It includes advice for the new law firm associate, written by a Yale Law School graduate who made partner in a national law firm. Written in a first- and second-person tense and filled with no-nonsense guidance from someone actually in the mentorship role in a real-world law firm.

This is the first book in a Jagged Rocks of Wisdom series to help the new attorney. The second book, Jagged Rocks of Wisdom-The Memo: Mastering the Legal Memorandum, focuses on the many challenges of one of the major task for a new attorney - the law memo - for the highly demanding world of partners and clients. A third book, Jagged Rocks of Wisdom -Negotiation, is expected in 2011.

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5 West 16th Street Building
5 West 16th Street Building
Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The bow-fronted house at No. 5 West 16th Street, constructed c. 1846, serves as a distinctive reminder of the period when this section of Manhattan, near Union Square, was a fashionable neighborhood filled with handsome residences. This brick house with its generous width and elegant curved front is a finely-designed example Of thfi Greek Revival Style; the unusual bow front is a feature more carnraonly found on houses in Boston dating from earlier in the nineteenth century. The eared and battered entrance surround, executed in stone, is a distinguishing architectural feature initially derived from Egyptian sources that was popular in Greek Revival rowhouse designs during the 1840s. This house is one of a group of nine residences (four extant1) constructed under the terms of a restrictive agreement which governed the use and overall design of the buildings to ensure that this block of West 16th Street would develop as a fine residential street. During the late-nineteenth century and early-twentieth century the character of the area changed from purely residential to one of mixed commercial and residential use. This house has maintained its simple elegance and residential character, though adapted to meet the commercial requirements of the neighborhood. Development of the Union Square Neighborhood The block of West 16th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues lay-within the original boundaries of a farm belonging to Simon Congo, a free black man in seventeenth-century New York. This property was later incorporated into the holdings of the esteemed landowner Henry Brevoort of the Bowery, a New York civic leader. The northernmost tract of the Brevoort farm was sold to Thomas and Samuel Burling in 1799, and in 1825 John Cowman purchased the section of land now roughly bounded by Fifth and Sixth Avenues and West 16th and 17th Streets. The land remained rural into the 1830s, despite the fact that Fifth and Sixth Avenues were opened to traffic in this area a decade earlier. The development of this and the surrounding blocks was tied to New York's inexorable march northward. The fact that this area became a prime residential neighborhood was due to its proximity to Union Square. Union Place (as Union Square was originally known) located just over one block to the east, appears on the New York City Commissioners Map of 1807-11, which formalized the street grid of Manhattan above Houston Street. It was formed by the unplanned convergence or "union" of the Bowery Road (Fourth Avenue), and Bloomingdale Road (Broadway), and initially extended from 10th to 17th Streets, on land owned by the Manhattan Bank. In 1815, however, the state legislature reduced the size of Union Place by marking the cross-town artery of 14th Street as its southern boundary. The site was at times used as a potters' field, and as late as 1833 was covered with crude shanties. laid out by attorney and landowner Samuel B. Ruggles, the new Union Place became an integral part of the city plan in the early 1830s to improve vehicular traffic patterns while providing the amenities of a formal park within the expanding city. After the square was cleared, graded, and paved it was formally opened to the public on July 19, 1839, and sometime thereafter became known as Union Square. The perimeter of the square was soon lined with fine residential buildings, a development pattern which gradually spread to the surrounding blocks as well. The Residential Development of West 16th Street As older residential districts further downtown declined or were displaced by mercantile development, the Union Square area, then bordering on the city' s northernmost urban 1 imits, acted as a magnet for new residential development in the 1840s, and soon became a prosperous neighborhood of mansions and Greek Revival rowhouses. John Cowman, who owned extensive real estate throughout this area, died in 1832. His will provided that, after a ten year period, his property was to be divided equally among his three children, but only his son Augustus T. Cowman and his son-in-law Edward S. Mesier (widower of John Cowman's daughter Susan) were still living when the terms of the will were carried out in 1842. Augustus T. Cowman (1814?-1854) owned a contracting firm in Manhattan and lived in Hyde Park, while Mesier (1803-1854) was a partner in the firm of Mesier & Rich, book publishers and stationery merchants. In 1842, Cowman and Mesier divided the estate of John Cowman, a portion of which extended as far as Union Square. On the north side of West 16th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues, Augustus Cowman received the lots from No. 23 to the west and Mesier acquired the property to the east. Mesier proceeded to reorganize eleven of the twenty-five foot wide lots into nine lots, each thirty-three feet, four inches wide (lots 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35, 37, 39, 41). He kept the other two twenty-five foot wide
19 West 16th Street Building
19 West 16th Street Building
Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States Located on the north side of West 16th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues, No. 19 West 16th Street is a distinctive Greek Revival ^rowhouse constructed about 1846, at a time when the Union Square area was developing as a fashionable neighborhood. As the city expanded northward in the 1840s, the area west of Union Square and north of 14th Street, then bordering on the city's northernmost urban limits, became a prosperous neighborhood of mansions: and fine rowhouses. Characteristic of the Greek Revival style, this brick-fronted house, with its elegant design and proportions, is trimmed in finely detailed stone, ironwork, and wood, exemplified by the original wood door enframement with its slender Corinthian pilasters supporting an entablature and transom above. The eared and battered entrance surround, executed in stone, is a distinguishing architectural feature initially derived from Egyptian sources that was popular in Greek Revival rowhouse designs during the 1840s. This rowhouse is one of at least twelve on this block planned and probably built by speculator and businessman Edward S. Mesier, under a restrictive agreement that determined the appearance and use of the buildings in order to ensure that West 16th Street, like the surrounding neighborhood, develop as a block of fine residences. In the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century, the area changed in character from residential to one of mixed use, as commercial buildings replaced most of the older rowhouses. Remarkably intact, No. 19 West 16th Street maintains its simple elegance and serves as a significant reminder of the former residential character of the neighborhood to the west of Union Square. The Development of the Union Square Neighborhood The site of 19 West 16th Street originally laid within the original boundaries of a farm belonging to Simon Congo, a "free black man" and property owner in seventeenth-century New York. This property was later incorporated into the holdings of esteemed landowner Henry Brevoort of the Bowery, a New York civic leader. The northernmost tract of the Brevoort farm was sold to Thomas and Samuel Burling in 1799 and in 1825 the section of land now roughly bounded by Fifth and Sixth Avenues and West 16th and 17th Streets was purchased from them by John Cowman. The land remained rural into the 1830s, despite the fact that Fifth and Sixth Avenues were opened to traffic in this area a decade earlier. The development of this and the surrounding blocks was tied to New York's inexorable march northward. The fact that this area became a prime residential neighborhood was due to its proximity to Union Square. Union Place (later known as Union Square), located a little over one block to the east of 19 West 16th Street, appears on the New York City Commissioners Map of 1807-11, which formalized the street grid of Manhattan above Houston Street. It was formed by the unplanned convergence or "union" of the Bowery Road (Fourth Avenue), and Bloomingdale Road (Broadway), and initially extended from 10th to 17th Streets, on land owned by the Manhattan Bank. In 1815, however, the state legislature reduced the size of Union Place by marking the cross-town artery of 14th Street as its southern boundary. The site was at times used as a potters' field, and as late as 1833 was covered with crude shanties. Laid out by attorney and landowner Samuel B. Ruggles, the new Union Place became an integral part of the city plan in the early 1830s to improve vehicular traffic patterns while providing the amenities of a formal park within the expanding city. After the square was cleared, graded, and paved it was formally opened to the public on July 19, 1839, and sometime thereafter became known as Union Square. The perimeter of the square was soon lined with fine residential buildings. Beginning in the 1860s, Union Square underwent a commercial transformation, first predominated by theaters, hotels and luxury retailers, and later by office and loft buildings. The Residential Development of West 16th Street As older residential districts further downtown declined or were displaced by mercantile development, the Union Square area, then bordering on the city's northernmost urban limits, acted as a magnet for new residential development in the 1840s, and soon became a prosperous neighborhood of mansions and Greek Revival rowhouses. Although Fifth and Sixth Avenues in this area were open to traffic in the 1820s, the land between them remained largely rural through the 1830s, with sporadic development in the early 1840s. John Cowman, who had acquired much of the north side of West 16th Street by 1825, died in 1832. His will provided that, after a ten year period, his property was to be divided equally between his three children, but only his son Augustus T. Cowman (18147-1854) and his son-in-law Edward Sebring Mesier (widower of John Cowman's daughter Sus

west houston attorney
west houston attorney
The E-Myth Attorney: Why Most Legal Practices Don't Work and What to Do About It
The complete guide to the business of running a successful legal practice
Many attorneys in small and mid-size practices are experts on the law, but may not have considered their practice as much from a business perspective.
Michael Gerber’s The E-Myth Attorney fills this void, giving you powerful advice on everything you need to run your practice as a successful business, allowing you to achieve your goals and grow your practice. Featuring Gerber's signature easy-to-understand, easy-to-implement style, The E-Myth Attorney features:
A complete start-up guide you can use to get your practice off the ground quickly, as well as comprehensive action steps for maximizing the performance of an existing practice
Industry specific advice from two recognized legal experts that have developed a highly successful legal practice using Gerber’s principles
Gerber’s universal appeal as a recognized expert on small businesses who has coached, taught, and trained over 60,000 small businesses
The E-Myth Attorney is the last guide you'll ever need to make the difference in building or developing your successful legal practice.

The complete guide to the business of running a successful legal practice
Many attorneys in small and mid-size practices are experts on the law, but may not have considered their practice as much from a business perspective.
Michael Gerber’s The E-Myth Attorney fills this void, giving you powerful advice on everything you need to run your practice as a successful business, allowing you to achieve your goals and grow your practice. Featuring Gerber's signature easy-to-understand, easy-to-implement style, The E-Myth Attorney features:
A complete start-up guide you can use to get your practice off the ground quickly, as well as comprehensive action steps for maximizing the performance of an existing practice
Industry specific advice from two recognized legal experts that have developed a highly successful legal practice using Gerber’s principles
Gerber’s universal appeal as a recognized expert on small businesses who has coached, taught, and trained over 60,000 small businesses
The E-Myth Attorney is the last guide you'll ever need to make the difference in building or developing your successful legal practice.

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