THE GROWING NOTES


NOTES ON GENDLIN


///

NOTES ON THE TEXT

APPROACHING the text

The shape of the text -- mud map of overall structure/contents
The style of the text -- the textual qualities of the text

THINKING WITH/IN the model


GRIPPING the whole model


THREADING THROUGH the text -- tracing various themes/terms/facets

Key concepts
    occurring
    stoppage / stop-ons / leafing through to pausing

Comparison of new and old model
    Quotes: Gendlin's many comparisons of New model vs Old Model 
    Table: Comparison of models 

Examples and anedotes
    Quotes: Gendlin's many Examples and Anecdotes 

Methodological comments
    Quotes: Gendlin's occasional methodological comments 

///

NOTES ON RELATED TEXTS

GENDLIN'S OTHER TEXTS -- SUMMARISING CORE ASPECTS OF HIS PROCESS MODEL

'Implicit Precision' is a recent and very helpful paper by Gendlin, which outlines many of the central key concepts and issues found in A Process Model, giving some very pithy definitions and arguments. NB: The paper was written for an edited book on approaches to 'the background' in contemporary philosophy, so some of the paper is inflected with this concern (in Z. Radman (Ed.) Knowing without thinking: The theory of the background in philosophy of mind, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.)

    Implicit Precision by Gene Gendlin (2012)

Other relevant articles by Gene, outlining aspects of his process model, include:

    The Implicitly Functioning Body (2008). NB: this is not found on the Gendlin Online LIbrary; it is something found on Mike Finch's website.
    A changed ground for precise cognition (2009). Unpublished manuscript (35 pp.).
    What first and third person processes really are (2009). Journal of Consciousness Studies, 16, No. 10–12, 2009, pp. 332–62.
    Process generates structures: Structures alone don't generate process (2012). The Folio, 23 (1), 3-13.

GENDLIN'S OTHER TEXTS -- ON PHILOSOPHY / THINKING


OTHER GUIDES (short articles) ON 'A PROCESS MODEL'

    How I read the structure of the PM text (1999) by Greg Walkerden
    A brief guide to A Process Model (2004) by Campbell Purton