CHAPEL OF FLOWERS FUNERAL HOME : CHAPEL OF FLOWERS

Chapel of flowers funeral home : Boys before flower dramawiki.

Chapel Of Flowers Funeral Home


chapel of flowers funeral home
    funeral home
  • a mortuary where those who knew the deceased can come to pay their last respects
  • A funeral home, funeral parlor or mortuary, is a business that provides burial and funeral services for the deceased and their families. These services may include a prepared wake and funeral, and the provision of a chapel for the funeral.
  • An establishment where the dead are prepared for burial or cremation
  • A place for dealing with dead bodies, viewing and funeral services.
    flowers
  • Induce (a plant) to produce flowers
  • (of a plant) Produce flowers; bloom
  • (flower) reproductive organ of angiosperm plants especially one having showy or colorful parts
  • Be in or reach an optimum stage of development; develop fully and richly
  • (flower) bloom: produce or yield flowers; "The cherry tree bloomed"
  • (flower) a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
    chapel
  • Chapel (real name Bruce Stinson) is a fictional comic book character in the Image Comics universe. He started out as a supervillain but later became a superhero.
  • A small building for Christian worship, typically one attached to an institution or private house
  • A chapel is a building used by Christians, members of other religions, and sometimes interfaith communities, as a place of fellowship and worship.
  • a place of worship that has its own altar
  • Regular services held in such a building
  • A part of a large church or cathedral with its own altar and dedication
chapel of flowers funeral home - Funeral Home
Funeral Home (1980)
Funeral Home (1980)
A young woman arrives at her grandmother's place to help convert it over to a bed and breakfast inn from the funeral home which was operated by her recently departed grandfather. After completing the change and guests begin to arrive, the granddaughter hears strange noises from the basement and finds some of the guests have disappeared. Getting nowhere with the police, the granddaughter decides to get to the bottom of the mystery by going down to the locked cellar to see what's inside.
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Roma - La Pietà di Michelangelo nella Basilica di San Pietro
Roma - La Pietà di Michelangelo nella Basilica di San Pietro
La Pieta (1499) is a masterpiece of Renaissance sculpture by the renowned artist Michelangelo Buonarroti, housed in St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City. It is the first of a number of works of the same theme by the artist. The statue was commissioned for the French cardinal Jean de Billheres, who was a representative in Rome. The statue was made for the cardinal's funeral monument, but was moved to its current location, the first chapel on the right as one enters the basilica, in the 18th century. This famous work of art depicts the body of Jesus on the lap of his mother Mary after the Crucifixion. The theme is of Northern origin, popular by that time in France but not yet in Italy. Michelangelo's interpretation of the Pieta is unique to the precedents. It is an important work as it balances the Renaissance ideals of classical beauty with naturalism. The statue is one of the most highly finished works by Michelangelo. The structure is pyramidal, and the vertex coincides with Mary's head. The statue widens progressively down the drapery of Mary's dress, to the base, the rock of Golgotha. The figures are quite out of proportion, owing to the difficulty of depicting a fully-grown man cradled full-length in a woman's lap. Much of Mary's body is concealed by her monumental drapery, and the relationship of the figures appears quite natural. Michelangelo's interpretation of the Pieta was far different from those previously created by other artists, as he sculpted a young and beautiful Mary rather than an older woman around 50 years of age. The marks of the Crucifixion are limited to very small nail marks and an indication of the wound in Jesus' side. The Madonna is represented as being very young, and about this peculiarity there are different interpretations. One is that her youth symbolizes her incorruptible purity, as Michelangelo himself said to his biographer and fellow sculptor Ascanio Condivi: Do you not know that chaste women stay fresh much more than those who are not chaste? How much more in the case of the Virgin, who had never experienced the least lascivious desire that might change her body? Another explanation suggests that Michelangelo's treatment of the subject was influenced by his passion for Dante's Divina Commedia: so well-acquainted was he with the work that when he went to Bologna he paid for hospitality by reciting verses from it. In Paradiso (cantica 33 of the poem) Saint Bernard, in a prayer for the Virgin Mary, says "Vergine madre, figlia del tuo figlio" (Virgin mother, daughter of your son). This is said because, being that Christ is one of the three figures of Trinity, Mary would be his daughter, but it is also she who bore him. A third interpretation is that suggested by Condivi shortly after the passage quoted above: simply that "such freshness and flower of youth, besides being maintained in by natural means, were assisted by act of God". Yet another exposition posits that the viewer is actually looking at an image of Mary holding the baby Jesus. Mary's youthful appearance and apparently serene facial expression, coupled with the position of the arms could suggest that she is seeing her child, while the viewer is seeing an image of the future. Finally, one modern interpretation suggests that the smaller size of Christ helps to illustrate his feebleness while in his state of death; no longer living, he now appears small in his mother's arms. Interpreting the sculpture in terms of its name, one might trace the origin: "The duty children owed their parents, termed pietas, was associated by Romans with the duty humans owed their gods" (James S. Jeffers, The Greco-Roman World of the New Testament Era: Exploring the Background of Early Christianity, Downers Grove, Ill. InterVarsity Press, 1999). While there was a precedent for painted depictions of Mary grieving over the dead Christ in Florentine art, the subject appears to have been novel to Italian sculpture. There was, however, a tradition of sculptured pietas in Northern art, particularly in Germany, Poland and the Cardinal's native France. In addition, the church of San Domenico in Bologna had a German sculpted pieta. This has led some to believe that the donor had these statues in mind when the work was commissioned. The process took less than two years. The Pieta's first home was the Chapel of Santa Petronilla, a Roman mausoleum near the south transept of St. Peter's, which the Cardinal chose as his funerary chapel. The chapel was later demolished by Bramante during his rebuilding of the basilica. According to Giorgio Vasari, shortly after the installation of his Pieta Michelangelo overheard someone remark that it was the work of another sculptor, Cristoforo Solari. Michelangelo then carved MICHAELA[N]GELUS BONAROTUS FLORENTIN[US] FACIEBA[T] (Michelangelo Buonarroti, Florentine, made it) on the sash running across Mary's breast. It was the only work he ever signed. La Pieta vaticana e una delle pri
Kessel Funeral Home
Kessel Funeral Home
Kessel Funeral Home. St. Elmo Illinois. Owned and operated by licensed Embalmer and Funeral Director Valerie J. Kessel-Worley The Kessel Funeral Home is located in St. Elmo Illinois, a small town where in 1935 oil was discovered. The oil boom is all but gone but the town and surrounding rural areas still flourish today. In the fall of 1939, this lovely brick colonial home began construction and was completed in the spring of 1940. The building was originally built by B.B. and his son Revis Brown, who had founded the Brown Funeral Home in 1921. The funeral home was constructed by Mautz Construction of Effingham, IL who used bricks made at the local brickyard. The May family purchased the funeral home in 1970 from the Moeller family and then sold it the Kessel Corporation in April of 1996. The corporation now owns the business under the name of Kessel Funeral Home. Valerie J Kessel-Worley is the licensed funeral director and embalmer who fully operates the business and lives within the residence of the funeral home with her husband Craig. The Funeral home consists of a main chapel which seats 65 and an additional private family room which accommodates up to 25. The chapel features a hand crafted stained glass window of an angel above the casket area. All of the original wood remains which includes the chair rail, baseboards and detail design curved overhead shadow boxes. This unique vintage design is carried throughout the funeral home and residence down to the detail on the fireplaces. The main entrance foyer features a very large curved walnut staircase that separates the funeral home from the private residence. The staircase opens the lower foyer to the upper foyer, and gives the room the detail of extraordinary craftsmanship of the era in which it was constructed. By the entrance near the side walk as you approach the front entry way, families can hear the trickling of water from the exquisite fountain that was purchased in Rome in the 1970's. The funeral home includes 17 rooms and a full basement which was hand dug by early generations of residents that still live in the area. These characteristics uphold the present values of the people of St. Elmo. The building also features two fireplaces, four bedrooms, a large Master bath, and 2 other full baths, living room, kitchen with a breakfast nook. The side gardens and decorative fish pond along with arranged flowers, brick paved sidewalks and wonderfully unique statues provide a peaceful and relaxing atmosphere to enjoy. The funeral home has been under extensive refurbishing since it's purchase in 1996 and was completed in late spring of 2005. All details are reproduced to maintain the original beauty and craftsmanship of this lovely estate. The small town of St. Elmo keeps up with the all traditional morals of past generations. The Kessel Funeral Home strives to keep the past an important part of the future

chapel of flowers funeral home
chapel of flowers funeral home
Tales from Kentucky Funeral Homes
In Tales from Kentucky Funeral Homes, William Lynwood Montell has collected stories and reminiscences from funeral home directors and embalmers across the state. These accounts provide a record of the business of death as it has been practiced in Kentucky over the past fifty years. The collection ranges from tales of old-time burial practices, to stories about funeral customs unique to the African American community, to tales of premonitions, mistakes, and even humorous occurrences. Other stories involve such unusual aspects of the business as snake-handling funerals, mistaken identities, and in-home embalming. Taken together, these firsthand narratives preserve an important aspect of Kentucky social life not likely to be collected elsewhere. Most of these funeral home stories involve the recent history of Kentucky funeral practices, but some descriptive accounts go back to the era when funeral directors used horse-drawn wagons to reach secluded areas. These accounts, including stories about fainting relatives, long-winded preachers, and pallbearers falling into graves, provide significant insights into the pivotal role morticians have played in local life and culture over the years.

In Tales from Kentucky Funeral Homes, William Lynwood Montell has collected stories and reminiscences from funeral home directors and embalmers across the state. These accounts provide a record of the business of death as it has been practiced in Kentucky over the past fifty years. The collection ranges from tales of old-time burial practices, to stories about funeral customs unique to the African American community, to tales of premonitions, mistakes, and even humorous occurrences. Other stories involve such unusual aspects of the business as snake-handling funerals, mistaken identities, and in-home embalming. Taken together, these firsthand narratives preserve an important aspect of Kentucky social life not likely to be collected elsewhere. Most of these funeral home stories involve the recent history of Kentucky funeral practices, but some descriptive accounts go back to the era when funeral directors used horse-drawn wagons to reach secluded areas. These accounts, including stories about fainting relatives, long-winded preachers, and pallbearers falling into graves, provide significant insights into the pivotal role morticians have played in local life and culture over the years.

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