FREE BLUES GUITAR SCALES. GUITAR SCALES

Free blues guitar scales. Clarinet family instruments

Free Blues Guitar Scales


free blues guitar scales
    guitar scales
  • (Guitar scale) In a string instrument, the scale length (often simply called the "scale") is the sounding length of the strings. On instruments with strings which are not stopped (harp, piano) and on most fretless instruments it is the length of string between the nut and the bridge.
    blues
  • a state of depression; "he had a bad case of the blues"
  • a type of folksong that originated among Black Americans at the beginning of the 20th century; has a melancholy sound from repeated use of blue notes
  • A piece of such music
  • Blues is the name given to both a musical form and a music genre that originated in African-American communities of primarily the Deep South of the United States at the end of the 19th century from spirituals, work songs, field hollers, shouts and chants, and rhymed simple narrative ballads.
  • Feelings of melancholy, sadness, or depression
  • Melancholic music of black American folk origin, typically in a twelve-bar sequence. It developed in the rural southern US toward the end of the 19th century, finding a wider audience in the 1940s as blacks migrated to the cities. This urban blues gave rise to rhythm and blues and rock and roll
    free
  • Without cost or payment
  • loose: without restraint; "cows in India are running loose"
  • able to act at will; not hampered; not under compulsion or restraint; "free enterprise"; "a free port"; "a free country"; "I have an hour free"; "free will"; "free of racism"; "feel free to stay as long as you wish"; "a free choice"
  • With the sheets eased
  • grant freedom to; free from confinement
free blues guitar scales - The 5
The 5 Important Patterns of Guitar Scales and Arpeggios
The 5 Important Patterns of Guitar Scales and Arpeggios
It is crucial to learn this scale in all 5 patterns, thereby bringing about the ability to play the scale in all areas of the guitar neck rather than just one. The first scale is master is the G Minor Pentatonic. After discovering the five patterns of this scale in G Minor Pentatonic , it becomes conceivable then to improvise lead anyplace on the neck over any rock tunes in the key of G Minor (such as the famous riff from “Smoke On The Water” by Deep Purple). The Minor Pentatonic scale is the 1st and most critical scale to learn, especially for blues and rock n’ roll. This scale is indeed utilized by blues guitar players as well, though far less often compared to rock and jazz players.

It is crucial to learn this scale in all 5 patterns, thereby bringing about the ability to play the scale in all areas of the guitar neck rather than just one. The first scale is master is the G Minor Pentatonic. After discovering the five patterns of this scale in G Minor Pentatonic , it becomes conceivable then to improvise lead anyplace on the neck over any rock tunes in the key of G Minor (such as the famous riff from “Smoke On The Water” by Deep Purple). The Minor Pentatonic scale is the 1st and most critical scale to learn, especially for blues and rock n’ roll. This scale is indeed utilized by blues guitar players as well, though far less often compared to rock and jazz players.

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Patrice at Couleur café
Patrice at Couleur café
Patrice Babatunde Bart-Williams (born July 9, 1979 in Kerpen, Germany), better known as Patrice, is an Afro-German reggae artist. He also often uses his second name: Babatunde (Yoruba: return of the father), which his parents gave him since Patrice was born on the same day that his grandfather died. His music is influenced by Jimi Hendrix and Bob Marley. Patrice is biracial, being the son of a German mother and the Sierra Leonean writer-activist Gaston Bart-Williams. Rewind: The release of his documentary DVD, Raw & Uncut, in 2006 marked “the end of an era”, as PATRICE says today. What followed counts among the most important chapters in PATRICE’s musical and personal development. Following three internationally successful albums and tours of truly biblical dimensions, PATRICE has found himself again, opening doors which have liberated him on a grand scale, and his fourth studio album, FREE-PATRI-ATION, allows his audience to share this newly found freedom for the first time. Since the very early days of his career, PATRICE has been the type of universal musician who resents being restricted to specific pigeonholes; just feeling that people expected certain things from him used to cause spontaneous tensions. These days, he looks back with amusement on ideas like releasing a blues album just to defy all expectations, and has to laugh just talking about that episode. He is enjoying a new kind of casualness and self-awareness, and part of his current serenity is based on this self-awareness, which he earned himself in the course of the ten years since the release of his legendary debut EP, “Lions”. You could say that PATRICE has arrived at last - but somebody like him never arrives anywhere without having a new destination in mind. FREE-PATRI-ATION confirms on the one hand that PATRICE doesn’t have to prove anything; he has already found his true voice. And on the other hand, his new songs leave no doubt that he is determined to surpass himself again and again in the future. “I can only say that I am at a different place, and I feel much better, also in terms of my music,” PATRICE describes those basic changes, pointing out a thoroughly positive development in terms of the album’s production: “In Commissioner Gordon, I have found somebody who really is a good friend, and it was great fun to record the album with him. I always felt that he understood me completely.” Commissioner Gordon has been in the music industry for more than 25 years. He received one of three Grammies for his “The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill” mix. Gordon has worked with the likes of KRS-One and the Marley family, and with artists such as Alicia Keys, Joss Stone and Amy Winehouse. The man has seen and heard it all, yet he goes into raptures on the subject of Patrice: “He’s a great songwriter, and we get on really well. That’s the most important thing. When you want to create music, there’s got to be the right feel between the people involved. Before you can talk about a successful album, the connection between the people who want to create music together is crucial. Only if the chemistry and the connection between them are right, can they create good music. Patrice and I connected ...” PATRICE agrees, stressing to which extent the album was influenced by the recording situation at the Commissioner’s studio in New Jersey. “Especially when we were not recording, the conversations we had, our discussions and how they left their mark on the lyrics I wrote - somehow it was all very real, had more relevance to what is currently going, was very immediate ...” Still FREE-PATRI-ATION is more than the testament of an unusual cooperation which has turned into a friendship. As Commissioner Gordon hinted, this is the kind of collaboration that produces successful albums - if not necessarily in financial terms. Away from commercial considerations, for the artist this kind of success is based on a feeling of inner satisfaction - which is a little like a homecoming. And so, the ambiguous title amplifies that overtone of returning home. FREE-PATRI-ATION includes a number of different allusions. Freetown in Sierra Leone, his father’s native city, which was founded by liberated slaves, is just as much present in the title as “(re)patriation”, the liberation and return of former slaves; and last but not least there’s an element of a self-empowered PATRICE finding his very own home country. Everything has come together. Very much in the same way as everything has come together in his music. And so it is also that specific quality of the new PATRICE which allows him to bring things together in a way that creates a unit, combining classic Jamaican riddims with African 6/8 time elements, a classic folk paraphrasing meeting funk guitars. “I was looking for a constant element in all the musical genres that I like, and I found it in the groove,” PATRICE explains this fusion, and at last he realises the secret is disclosed, and with an almost embarrassed ai
scales
scales
sitting in amber's house her parents hug me and call me daughter number two it's a fresh home, a home with instruments and plants and photos that make me laugh evan is here for a few days, he uses a photograph i took of his band for their new cd cover he talks and plays and sits with us before flying to idaho and his national park job for the summer so many people i know are working in national parks, it's a good idea for people who don't want to be anywhere but in nature. i considered it but i know that i would miss people way too much. even if i don't feel connected to people, even if i'm not talking to them or playing an active role in their lives i just want to be around them, i love them so much and it's complicated and it ends up being in the way of living the way i know i ought to sometimes, living in a way that doesn't interrupt other people, or startle them or scare them. i'm pretty paranoid about freaking people out about how intense i am, i've been afraid of that forever, because it happens sometimes, it happens in front of my face and part of me just wants everyone else to just be more honest and to love harder, and then my self-consciousness kicks in and i realize this will never, ever happen, and i probably should employ at least an ounce of self-preservation instead of throwing myself at everything it takes so much self control every day to not write letters to everyone i love or everyone i think of so often or people i even just like, telling them why, telling them why they are gorgeous to me it would make them feel good yeah for a while but i think it would just end up creeping people out and it goes back, always, to that time noreen said no one will ever love me as much as i love them for the simple fact that i just do it and don't question it fuck fuck fuck fuck fuck i don't need it back really i've been working so hard to be the kind of person who doesn't need it back i just still get shaky knees, so nervous all the time i just want people to know how much i like them, but i know it will never happen in general, maybe, will never happen evan is teaching amber what chords are they are made up of three basic notes, he says i can play dozens of chords, i think to myself, and i don't know this, really i think he is funny trying to use math to explain music is it redundant? perhaps, perhaps not, it is not my place to say i just cannot feel it in that way i cannot freak out on an instrument and worry about perfect notes and worry worry about sound i just have to let it fall out my mouth or hands and hope i don't feel too sore in an hour or so when i'm done

free blues guitar scales
free blues guitar scales
The Everything Guitar Scales Book with CD: Over 700 scale patterns for every style of music (Everything (Music))
Once guitar players learn the basics, they need to take the next step in their musical education. Scales are the musical grammar they?re looking for, and this book is a one-stop shop for every scale guitar lovers could ever imagine! Highlights of this valuable reference book include: easy-to-follow fret board diagrams (no music reading required); thousands of scale shapes; scales for every style of music, including world/ethnic music; the basic theory behind the scales and tips on how to use them; and more. Musicians at all levels will enjoy the new sounds and possibilities these scales provide, and the accompanying audio CD demonstrates how to use the scales in real-life musical situations. This oversized volume contains everything guitarists need to know about scales in a fun, down-to-earth package!

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