BED AND BREAKFAST WESTERN MARYLAND : BREAKFAST WESTERN MARYLAND

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Bed And Breakfast Western Maryland


bed and breakfast western maryland
    western maryland
  • Western Maryland is the portion of U.S. state of Maryland that consists of Frederick, Washington, Allegany, and Garrett counties. The region is bounded by the Mason-Dixon line to the north, Preston County, West Virginia to the west, and the Potomac River to the south.
    breakfast
  • Have this meal
  • the first meal of the day (usually in the morning)
  • eat an early morning meal; "We breakfast at seven"
  • provide breakfast for
    bed
  • furnish with a bed; "The inn keeper could bed all the new arrivals"
  • A place or article used by a person or animal for sleep or rest
  • a piece of furniture that provides a place to sleep; "he sat on the edge of the bed"; "the room had only a bed and chair"
  • A piece of furniture for sleep or rest, typically a framework with a mattress and coverings
  • The time for sleeping
  • a plot of ground in which plants are growing; "the gardener planted a bed of roses"
bed and breakfast western maryland - Western Maryland-End
Western Maryland-End of an Era
Western Maryland-End of an Era
In the mid 70's, Emery Gulash brought his 16mm camera to West Virginia and lovingly photographed the Western Maryland before its total absorption by the B&O and Chessie. Here is mountain railroading in the east at its best. Multi-unit lash-ups of F7's and Geeps were the mainstay of the WM.

On three successive days, Emery shot considerable footage of the struggle through the Appalachians of these vintage trains. The photography--well what can you say...typical Gulash. With incredible composition, many in twilight add to this outstanding DVD of one of America's most beautiful railroads.
Green Frog has added Synced sound of real EMD's of the period. (No sound of locos that don't fit--only the real spectacular sound you expect from the Frog!)

Approx. 70 Minutes
This product is manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.

82% (16)
Western Maryland Railway Station (Cumberland, Maryland)
Western Maryland Railway Station (Cumberland, Maryland)
Western Maryland Railway Station is a historic railway station in Cumberland, Allegany County, Maryland. It was built in 1913 as a stop for the Western Maryland Railway (WM), and is a large commercial-style building that expresses the architectural functionalism of the turn of the 20th century. The brick structure is nine bays long and three bays wide, with two monumental stories on the west facade and three stories on the east. A one-story porch runs along the west facade and extends out toward the tracks.[2] The WM began daily through-train passenger service between Baltimore and Chicago, by way of Cumberland, on June 15, 1913. For several years the premier trains on the route, the Chicago Limited and Baltimore Limited, featured Pullman sleeping car service. Other WM trains ran between Cumberland and Elkins, West Virginia. The number and variety of passenger trains decreased through the years of the Great Depression and aftwerward. The WM ended its passenger train service between Cumberland and Baltimore in 1953, and the Cumberland to Elkins trains ended in 1959.[3]:239-266 Today the building is part of a preservation district called Canal Place, a facility operated by the National Park Service. The station houses offices of the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad and a visitors center for the C&O Canal National Historic Park. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. From Wikipedia
Western Maryland Railway in the mist.
Western Maryland Railway in the mist.
The original mainline of the Western Maryland (now CSX) at Penn Mar where the AT crosses the tracks. Last day of my AT hike and it rained.

bed and breakfast western maryland
bed and breakfast western maryland
T. H. Paul and J.A. Millholland Master Locomotive Builders of Western Maryland
This book describes two men whose careers intersected at the Mount Savage Locomotive Works in Western Maryland. T.H. Paul was Master Mechanic of the Works. But left to form his own business based in Frostburg. He focused on narrow gauge locomotives. His break with the Cumberland & Pennsylvania Railroad, owner of the Mount Savage Shops, was amicable. He sent business to Mount Savage, and they sent him business concerning narrow gauge and mining equipment, which they did not manufacture. Its was a win-win. When the Mount Savage Locomotive Works Catalog came out in 1889, Paul's engines were featured prominently.
James A. Millholland had come to Mount Savage with his father, also James Millholland, in 1866. He worked at the Mount Savage Locomotive Works and the Cumberland & Pennsylvania Railroad, then for the Georges Creek & Cumberland Railroad.
Paul's father was a Mill Wright, and Millholland's was a railroad man. Both Paul & Millholland became Master Mechanics of the Cumberland & Pennsylvania Railroad. And, both men contributed to the state-of-the-art in 19th century railroads, and both had patents granted to them. Both were key figures in the Industrialization that was taking place in western Maryland and the Nation as a whole in the 19th century.

This book describes two men whose careers intersected at the Mount Savage Locomotive Works in Western Maryland. T.H. Paul was Master Mechanic of the Works. But left to form his own business based in Frostburg. He focused on narrow gauge locomotives. His break with the Cumberland & Pennsylvania Railroad, owner of the Mount Savage Shops, was amicable. He sent business to Mount Savage, and they sent him business concerning narrow gauge and mining equipment, which they did not manufacture. Its was a win-win. When the Mount Savage Locomotive Works Catalog came out in 1889, Paul's engines were featured prominently.
James A. Millholland had come to Mount Savage with his father, also James Millholland, in 1866. He worked at the Mount Savage Locomotive Works and the Cumberland & Pennsylvania Railroad, then for the Georges Creek & Cumberland Railroad.
Paul's father was a Mill Wright, and Millholland's was a railroad man. Both Paul & Millholland became Master Mechanics of the Cumberland & Pennsylvania Railroad. And, both men contributed to the state-of-the-art in 19th century railroads, and both had patents granted to them. Both were key figures in the Industrialization that was taking place in western Maryland and the Nation as a whole in the 19th century.

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