CANTILEVER GATE WHEELS - CANTILEVER GATE

CANTILEVER GATE WHEELS - BEHIND THE WHEEL DRIVING TRAINING.

Cantilever Gate Wheels


cantilever gate wheels
    cantilever
  • project as a cantilever
  • Project as or like a cantilever
  • construct with girders and beams such that only one end is fixed; "Frank Lloyd Wright liked to cantilever his buildings"
  • projecting horizontal beam fixed at one end only
  • Support by a cantilever or cantilevers
    wheels
  • steering wheel: a handwheel that is used for steering
  • A circular object that revolves on an axle and forms part of a machine
  • A circular object that revolves on an axle and is fixed below a vehicle or other object to enable it to move easily over the ground
  • Used in reference to the cycle of a specified condition or set of events
  • (wheel) change directions as if revolving on a pivot; "They wheeled their horses around and left"
  • (wheel) a simple machine consisting of a circular frame with spokes (or a solid disc) that can rotate on a shaft or axle (as in vehicles or other machines)
    gate
  • A hinged barrier used to close an opening in a wall, fence, or hedge
  • A means of entrance or exit
  • supply with a gate; "The house was gated"
  • a movable barrier in a fence or wall
  • A gateway
  • a computer circuit with several inputs but only one output that can be activated by particular combinations of inputs
cantilever gate wheels - Cantilever Gate
Cantilever Gate Wheels Cantilever Slide Gates Cantilever Gate Rollers 1 Wheel with cover
Cantilever Gate Wheels Cantilever Slide Gates Cantilever Gate Rollers 1 Wheel with cover
Roller - 2" Square graphite impregnated nylon roller is UV stabilized and a full 7" in diameter. Post 4" Square. The precision machined low friction surface helps extend the life of the gate coating. The high density of the nylon roller allows gates to roll with minimum effort. A perfect match for automated gates to extend the life expectancy of expensive gate operators Cover - Pre-installed covers are included with every roller saving installation time and insuring that you always have them when you need them. UV stabilized black plastic covers are vented to allow moisture to drain so they work on either the top or bottom roller. FOR 4" POST

75% (14)
Carroll Street Bridge
Carroll Street Bridge
Gowanus, Brooklyn, New York, New York City, United States The Carroll Street Bridge over the Gowanus Canal, built in 1888-89, is one of the oldest bridges in New York City and the oldest of four known extant late-nineteenth/early-twentieth century American bridges of the "retractile" type. This unusual movable bridge functions by rolling back horizontally on wheels set on steel rails, thus providing clear passage through the canal channel. The Carroll Street Bridge was designed by engineers of the Brooklyn Department of City Works? the superstructure was constructed by the New Jersey Steel and Iron Company, a subsidiary of the prominent firm of Cooper, Hewitt & Company. It continues to operate essentially as it has since its completion. Gowanus Canal In 1847, developer-businessman Col. Daniel Richards petitioned the Brooklyn Common Council for permission to open streets in South Brooklyn. Richards had initiated the planning for the Atlantic Docks and Basin (begun 1840), and the Erie and Brooklyn Basins, Red Hook, which were the first of the major improvements to transform the Brooklyn commercial waterfront. As the port of New York expanded in the nineteenth century, the entire shoreline of Brooklyn from Greenpoint down to Red Hook was built up with docks and warehouses. To further spur commerce and development in South Brooklyn, Richards envisioned at the same time the creation of a mile-long barge canal fashioned out of Gowanus Creek, and the draining of the adjacent marshlands. It was not until 1866-69, however, that state legislation was passed to improve the Gowanus Canal, through dredging, the construction of docks, and rebuilding of bridges. The Gowanus Canal Improvement Commission was appointed to oversee the projects, while the Brooklyn Improvement Company was to perform construction work. As completed the canal extended the mile between Hamilton Avenue and Baltic Street, and five branches with docks extended for an additional two-thirds of a mile. One hundred feet wide and varying in depth from twelve to sixteen feet, the Gowanus Canal became lined with such industrial concerns as lumber, coal, brick, and stone yards, and flour and plaster mills. Six bridges crossed the canal, one of which was at Carroll Street. Carroll Street Bridge When the old Carroll Street Bridge was closed in 1887, a replacement was needed. But as reported by George Ingram, Assistant Engineer of the Brooklyn Department of City Works, it was as yet undecided what type of bridge was to be chosen: ...no progress has been made on the detail plans for the new bridge over Gowanus Canal at Carroll street, and no work can be done until the proper authority shall decide upon the form of bridge, whether centre-channel [retractile] or swing bridge; the property owners favor the centre-channel form of bridge as originally recommended by this bureau, but its construction will involve the use of a strip of land now belonging to private owners, and thus far the Common Council has failed to authorize its purchase. Ultimately the retractile type was used for the Carroll Street Bridge, as noted in February 1889, by the Department's Chief Engineer, Robert Van Buren: I am glad to report that the construction for the substructure of the Carroll Street bridge over the Gowanus Canal is making satisfactory progress, and that this long delayed work will now proceed with all possible dispatch. I am satisfied that the form of bridge which has been selected for this point, and whose construction Mr. Ingram has always advocated, and which is now made possible through the efforts of the Commissioner of this department, will reflect credit upon this bureau, and establish a type for all future bridges in this vicinity; the proposal of the well-known firm of Cooper, Hewitt and Co. has been accepted for the superstructure designed by this bureau, and the known reputation of that firm assures a prompt and thorough compliance with the terms of the contract, and a bridge which will be a credit to the city, and a relief to the people interested in its use. The bridge was completed by the end of 1889, at a total cost of $29,600. The Engineers of Carroll Street Bridge and Cooper, Hewitt & Company The design and construction of the Carroll Street Bridge was the responsibility of several individuals and organizations. Robert Van Buren was Chief Engineer of the Carroll Street Bridge project, with George Ingram as Engineer-in-Charge. Charles O. H. Fritzche participated in the design of the original mechanical system. The bridge superstructure was manufactured by the New Jersey Steel and Iron Company, a subsidiary of Cooper, Hewitt & Company. Robert Van Buren (1843-1919) was Chief Engineer, Bureau of Construction, of the Brooklyn Department of City Works from around 1877 until 1894. A descendant of President Martin Van Buren, he was educated at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. In 1898 he became Chief Engineer of the Brooklyn Depar
Carroll Street Bridge
Carroll Street Bridge
Gowanus, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States The Carroll Street Bridge over the Gowanus Canal, built in 1888-89, is one of the oldest bridges in New York City and the oldest of four known extant late-nineteenth/early-twentieth century American bridges of the "retractile" type. This unusual movable bridge functions by rolling back horizontally on wheels set on steel rails, thus providing clear passage through the canal channel. The Carroll Street Bridge was designed by engineers of the Brooklyn Department of City Works? the superstructure was constructed by the New Jersey Steel and Iron Company, a subsidiary of the prominent firm of Cooper, Hewitt & Company. It continues to operate essentially as it has since its completion. Gowanus Canal In 1847, developer-businessman Col. Daniel Richards petitioned the Brooklyn Common Council for permission to open streets in South Brooklyn. Richards had initiated the planning for the Atlantic Docks and Basin (begun 1840), and the Erie and Brooklyn Basins, Red Hook, which were the first of the major improvements to transform the Brooklyn commercial waterfront. As the port of New York expanded in the nineteenth century, the entire shoreline of Brooklyn from Greenpoint down to Red Hook was built up with docks and warehouses. To further spur commerce and development in South Brooklyn, Richards envisioned at the same time the creation of a mile-long barge canal fashioned out of Gowanus Creek, and the draining of the adjacent marshlands. It was not until 1866-69, however, that state legislation was passed to improve the Gowanus Canal, through dredging, the construction of docks, and rebuilding of bridges. The Gowanus Canal Improvement Commission was appointed to oversee the projects, while the Brooklyn Improvement Company was to perform construction work. As completed the canal extended the mile between Hamilton Avenue and Baltic Street, and five branches with docks extended for an additional two-thirds of a mile. One hundred feet wide and varying in depth from twelve to sixteen feet, the Gowanus Canal became lined with such industrial concerns as lumber, coal, brick, and stone yards, and flour and plaster mills. Six bridges crossed the canal, one of which was at Carroll Street. Carroll Street Bridge When the old Carroll Street Bridge was closed in 1887, a replacement was needed. But as reported by George Ingram, Assistant Engineer of the Brooklyn Department of City Works, it was as yet undecided what type of bridge was to be chosen: ...no progress has been made on the detail plans for the new bridge over Gowanus Canal at Carroll street, and no work can be done until the proper authority shall decide upon the form of bridge, whether centre-channel [retractile] or swing bridge; the property owners favor the centre-channel form of bridge as originally recommended by this bureau, but its construction will involve the use of a strip of land now belonging to private owners, and thus far the Common Council has failed to authorize its purchase. Ultimately the retractile type was used for the Carroll Street Bridge, as noted in February 1889, by the Department's Chief Engineer, Robert Van Buren: I am glad to report that the construction for the substructure of the Carroll Street bridge over the Gowanus Canal is making satisfactory progress, and that this long delayed work will now proceed with all possible dispatch. I am satisfied that the form of bridge which has been selected for this point, and whose construction Mr. Ingram has always advocated, and which is now made possible through the efforts of the Commissioner of this department, will reflect credit upon this bureau, and establish a type for all future bridges in this vicinity; the proposal of the well-known firm of Cooper, Hewitt and Co. has been accepted for the superstructure designed by this bureau, and the known reputation of that firm assures a prompt and thorough compliance with the terms of the contract, and a bridge which will be a credit to the city, and a relief to the people interested in its use. The bridge was completed by the end of 1889, at a total cost of $29,600. The Engineers of Carroll Street Bridge and Cooper, Hewitt & Company The design and construction of the Carroll Street Bridge was the responsibility of several individuals and organizations. Robert Van Buren was Chief Engineer of the Carroll Street Bridge project, with George Ingram as Engineer-in-Charge. Charles O. H. Fritzche participated in the design of the original mechanical system. The bridge superstructure was manufactured by the New Jersey Steel and Iron Company, a subsidiary of Cooper, Hewitt & Company. Robert Van Buren (1843-1919) was Chief Engineer, Bureau of Construction, of the Brooklyn Department of City Works from around 1877 until 1894. A descendant of President Martin Van Buren, he was educated at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. In 1898 he became Chief Engineer of the Brooklyn Depar

cantilever gate wheels
cantilever gate wheels
Cantilever Gate Wheels Cantilever Slide Gates Cantilever Gate Rollers - SET OF 4
Roller - 2 3/8" (2 1/2") round graphite impregnated nylon roller is UV stabilized and a full 7" in diameter. The precision machined low friction surface helps extend the life of the gate coating. The high density of the nylon roller allows gates to roll with minimum effort. A perfect match for automated gates to extend the life expectancy of expensive gate operators Cover - Pre-installed covers are included with every roller saving installation time and insuring that you always have them when you need them. UV stabilized black plastic covers are vented to allow moisture to drain so they work on either the top or bottom roller.

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