SEND FLOWERS TO CZECH : TO CZECH

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Send Flowers To Czech


send flowers to czech
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  • Send Flowers is the debut album release from Black Lungs, the side project of Alexisonfire guitarist and backing vocalist Wade MacNeil. MacNeil's sound has been described as "the soundtrack for punk rockers, hip hoppers, pill poppers, young ladies and show stoppers."
    czech
  • Of or relating to the Czechs or their language
  • a native of inhabitant of the Czech Republic
  • of or relating to Czechoslovakia or its people or their language; "The Czech border"; "Czechoslovak nationalists"; "The Czechoslovakian population"
  • the Slavic language of Czechs
send flowers to czech - Czech-English/English-Czech Dictionary
Czech-English/English-Czech Dictionary and Phrasebook (Hippocrene Dictionary & Phrasebooks)
Czech-English/English-Czech Dictionary and Phrasebook (Hippocrene Dictionary & Phrasebooks)
Located in the heart of Europe, the Czech Republic boasts distinctive language spoken by over 10 million natives. The country of Milos Forman, Antonin Dvorak, and Milan Kundera is a popular tourist destination, due to its many historic villages and castles, as well as ski resorts and mineral-springs spas. This conveniently sized volume contains essential words and phrases for the traveller and student in both Czech and English. Its basic grammar, pronunciation guide, and two-way dictionary make it the ideal tool for English speakers who wish to learn this language at home or abroad.

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Martyr
Martyr
This candid shot was taken of a young man alone with his thoughts at the John Lennon Peace Wall in Prague. Since posting this photo I've received a couple of messages identifying him as Lucien Zell, a poet originally from the US but now living in Prague. It stands in a quiet square amidst the baroque architecture of Prague's diplomatic quarter. Though Lennon never visited the Bohemian capital, he was a pacifist hero for the Czech subculture during the totalitarian era. In the decade following the collapse of Communism, the Lennon Wall came to represent not only a memorial to Lennon and his ideas, but also a monument to free speech and the non-violent rebellion of Czech youth against the repressions of neo-Stalinism. Shortly after Lennon's death in 1980, under the ever watchful eyes of the Communist secret police, an anonymous group of Prague youth set up a mock grave for the ex-Beatle. The event was spontaneous, much in the same way that fans in New York City had gathered at Central Park upon hearing of Lennon's death. But unlike the gathering in New York, mourners in Prague risked prison for what authorities called "subversive activities against the state." Prague's mock tombstone was, in fact, a recess within a garden wall that forms the backside of a 14th century churchyard. At the time of Lennon's death, western pop songs were banned by Communist authorities and some Czech musicians who played the music were sent to jail for the offense. But the threat of prison couldn't keep people from slipping into the square at night to scrawl graffiti epitaphs in honor of their underground hero. The Communist police tried repeatedly to whitewash over the graffiti but they could never manage to keep the wall clean. Paintings of Lennon began to appear along with lyrics of his songs. The wall quickly took on a political focus and, inevitably, developed into a forum for grievances against the Communist state. Even the installation of surveillance cameras and the posting of an overnight guard couldn't stop the opinions from being expressed. Lennon marches also started to take place each year on Dec. 8. Those marches ultimately became linked to dissident protests on International Human Rights Day -- December 10. Participants in those early marches say they were channeled through a gauntlet of uniformed and plain-clothes police. Many were jailed or beaten for joining the marches. Some of the writing on the Lennon wall during the 1980s was inane but much of it was quite profound. A running battle developed between the police whitewashers and dissident graffiti writers until November, 1989 when Communism collapsed in the former Czechoslovakia's non-violent "Velvet Revolution." It has been reported that the French ambassador, whose office looks directly upon the colorful wall, telephoned Prague's municipal authorities late in 1989 and asked them not to paint over or interfere with the graffiti. Long after the Velvet Revolution, new writing continued to turn up regularly. The potent political messages of the 1980s became buried under lightweight graffiti, much of it written by western tourists, and the layers of paint continued to thicken with thousands of tourists visiting the site each year. In 1998, the local "John Lennon Peace Club" and the restituted owners of the wall -- a religious order dating from the 11th century called the Knights of the Maltese Cross -- worked together to reconstruct its crumbling facade. There has been much criticism of the work. The stone recess that had formed Lennon's original mock grave was covered by a larger cement "tombstone" with the painted words: "John Winston Lennon: October 9 1940 - Dec. 8, 1980." The wall's original plaster, which was being picked off in chunks by souvenir-hunting tourists, was replaced by a solid white surface, and a "happening" was organized where young Czechs and western backpackers added new messages -- none of them as powerful as the scrawlings of dissidents in the days of neo-Stalinism. James, a long-time expatriate American who lived near the wall during the July, 1998 "happening," described the event as retro nostalgia. "I saw all these wanna be hippies," he said. "Some of them weren't even alive in the 70s, much less the 60s. They were trying to be a part of a time that they'll never be able to understand. They were painting flowers and butterflies and lame cliches with brushes they'd been handed by the (Maltese) church. And they were all using from the same paint!!! I thought, 'Where are the punks? Where are the anarchists'?" James concluded that it will merely be a matter of time before "real" graffiti covers the sanitized wall so that it regains its original spirit. But others question whether this will happen. The Maltese Knights have already taken steps to paint over slogans that they've deemed to be too large, or expressions that their order do
Production of Brundibar in Theresianstadt, Czechoslovakia
Production of Brundibar in Theresianstadt, Czechoslovakia
Pictured: Honza Treichtlinger, chorus members of "Brundibar" How The Nazis Conned The World : Used A Children's Opera To Deceive International Observers By Mr. Bob Simon How did the Nazis manage to kill six million Jews and keep so much of the world in the dark? Part of the answer can be found when looking at the history of a concentration camp called Theresienstadt, in what was Czechoslovakia. Near the end of the war, the Nazis used the camp to con the world. Reports had begun circulating in allied capitals that the Nazis were exterminating Jews. The Nazis wanted to refute those reports, so they took this one camp and turned it, if ever so briefly, into a model town. They shot a movie there to prove how good they treated the Jews and invited the Red Cross to inspect it. Central to the deception was the performance of a children's opera called "Brundibar." The opera survived the war and so did a few members of its cast. They are in their mid-70s now and a few months ago, they invited 60 Minutes correspondent Bob Simon to spend some time with them. Every summer, a remarkable reunion takes place in the Czech Republic. A group of friends come together from all over the world, who all have one thing in common: they grew up in the shadow of death in a concentration camp in the lush mountains outside of Prague. They grew up quickly. Helga Kinsky couldn’t speak about the horror for a full 40 years. "Because actually whatever you did, you didn't have the right to live. You were sentenced to death. And it is something you can't get over," she explains. The survivors' friendship began in Theresienstadt, a transit camp. From here, a garrison town before the war, Jews were sent off to the gas chambers of Auschwitz. Nearly 140,000 Jews from all over central Europe passed through the camp, including many of Europe’s most prominent artists who left a record of what it was like. Much of the art has survived, some of it by children. They portrayed how cold and crowded they were, sleeping 30 to a room, how typhus epidemics swept through the camp. The dead were brought to catacombs before being incinerated. Bodies were carried on the same wagons used for bread. Jews weren’t gassed at Theresienstadt but more than 30,000 died of disease and hunger. Music flourished in the camp—it was like a Julliard for Jews. There were classes and concerts in cellars and attics. The hottest ticket in town was Brundibar, written by a Czech Jew and smuggled into the camp. "It wasn't easy to get tickets," remembers Dita Krause, who was in the choir in Brundibar. She says tickets were printed for every performance and were maybe the most difficult to get. The opera was performed 55 times by children in Theresienstadt. It’s a fairy tale of sorts, the story of a young brother and sister who with the help of a cat, a dog, a bird and the children of the village defeat an evil organ grinder named Brundibar. The opera ends with a victory song. Back in the camp, the Nazis filmed the performance in 1944. The lead role, the part of Brundibar, was played by a boy named Honza Treichlinger, who wore a fake mustache. "Everybody loved him. And everybody adored him," remembers Ella Weissberger, who played the cat. "I wore my sisters ski pants and my mothers sweater. Black sweater, this was my costume," she recalls. Wearing a costume was a relief from what Ella and the other kids had to wear all the time in the camp. "This was the only time that they said we don’t have to put on the Jewish star. A couple of minutes of freedom," she explains. A couple of minutes of freedom for Ella the cat. "All I can hear and see is Ella, never stopping to sing the cat. So we all sang the cat in the end," remembers Eva Gross, who was 20 at the time. She taught the children. "It was lovely this was very nice, very liberating. Very—and of course the whole—not only the whole room, the whole house, the whole town sang the victory song afterwards," Gross remembers. The whole town was mesmerized by the opera, the story of an evil man with a mustache. An evil man with a moustache? Did the kids have any idea what the opera was really about? "Oh, yes, they knew exactly the symbolic meaning. I'm sure they did. The whole thing was of course symbolic, you know? Brundibar was Hitler. So, oh yes, they knew," says Gross. "It was our way to fight the evil. The Germans, maybe," says Handa Drori, who was a member of the chorus. Once, she got a chance to play the dog. Brundibar is a story of defiance. Asked if the Germans didn't realize that or whether they worried about it, Drori tells Simon, "Yeah that what we wondered all the time. If they don't understand that what we are singing is against them. If they don't understand it. Or if they just don't care, because they knew what we didn't know. That we are meant all to go to the gas chambers

send flowers to czech
send flowers to czech
Czech Seed Beads Mix Lot 11/0 Lagoon Blue Aquas 1/2 Hank
Czech 11/0 Seed Beads. Fabulous Czech Glass Seed Bead Mix. Elegant Shades Of Blue, Aqua, Citrine In A Variety Of Finishes. One Half Hank Of Delicate Seed Beads Size 11/0. Wonderful LAGOON mix of little 11/0 seed beads, one half hank, prestrung, mixed just as in photo, in shades of Blue, Aqua, Citrine, some with AB finish. Czech seed beads are some of the highest quality, most uniformly sized beads in use today. Quantity: - One half hank. Hanks are sometimes called 24 string, sometimes called 12 string, but they all have twelve loops of strung beads, resulting in 24 thread ends being tied together. PLEASE NOTE: THESE ARE SOLD BY HALF HANK, 6 long strings. There are approximately 2,000 beads per half hank, approximate weight.65 ounce. Measurements: Bead size 2.1mm, 17 beads per inch. Recommended English beading needle sizes 11 and smaller.

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