INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT CHLORINE. INTERESTING FACTS

Interesting Facts About Chlorine. Muscle Facts For Kids

Interesting Facts About Chlorine


    interesting facts
  • (Interesting Fact) During the days in which exploration of the states was prominent, the lechuguila species created a deadly obstacle for those who were exploring the southwest by ways of horses, because when riding, the leaves which were very sharp would puncture the horses' legs.
  • (Interesting Fact) A reference to the fire side of Hailfire Peaks was made by Gobi in Banjo-Kazooie (when you meet him at Click Clock Woods).
  • (Interesting Fact(s)) It is estimated that enough straw is incinerated each year in the U.S. to build 5 million 2000 square foot homes.
    chlorine
  • The movie was mainly filmed in Madison, New Jersey and Wayne, New Jersey.
  • a common nonmetallic element belonging to the halogens; best known as a heavy yellow irritating toxic gas; used to purify water and as a bleaching agent and disinfectant; occurs naturally only as a salt (as in sea water)
  • The chemical element of atomic number 17, a toxic, irritant, pale green gas
  • Chlorine (from the Greek word 'χλωρóς' (khlôros, meaning 'pale green')) is the chemical element with atomic number 17 and symbol Cl. It is a halogen, found in the periodic table in group 17 (formerly VII, VIIa, or VIIb).
interesting facts about chlorine
interesting facts about chlorine - Pandora's Poison:
Pandora's Poison: Chlorine, Health, and a New Environmental Strategy
Pandora's Poison: Chlorine, Health, and a New Environmental Strategy
Pandora's Poison presents a solution to one of the most insidious environmental problems of our time: the global build-up of toxic chemicals. Everywhere on the planet, hundreds of industrial chemicals called organochlorines are accumulating in the environment, the food supply, and our bodies. These substances--such infamous pollutants as dioxins, PCBs, and DDT, along with thousands of lesser-known hazards--are produced when chlorine gas is used to make plastics, paper, pesticides, and many industrial chemicals. In a thorough and accessible analysis, biologist Joe Thornton shows how global organochlorine pollution is already contributing to infertility, immune suppression, cancer, and developmental disorders in humans and wildlife.Thornton proposes a major shift in environmental science and policy. He shows that the current framework radically overestimates the ability of science and technology to address the complex global hazards of chemical mixtures. And he reveals how the "sound science" that dominates environmental regulations disguises political biases that protect polluters and gamble with public health.Articulating principles for a new environmental strategy, Thornton shows that the only practical solution is to take global action on broad classes of hazardous chemicals and the processes that produce them, starting with organochlorines. He lays out a democratically controlled program to replace the production and use of chlorine gas and its derivatives with safer, effective, and economically feasible alternatives, which are already available for the majority of chlorine uses. With an innovative interdisiciplinary approach, Pandora's Poison promises to revolutionize the debate over pollution, health, and the role of science in public policy.

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Netham Chemical Works
Netham Chemical Works
Crew's Hole is just over two miles up-river of Bristol Bridge. The Tar Works site was at the bottom of Troopers Hill, well known for its lone chimney. It was an industrial area from the 18th century. This is not surprising, for there was stone for quarrying, coal from both opencast mining and pits nearby in Conham and Hanham, and clay suitable for a fireclay works. It was east of Bristol, the traditional side of a city for a 'smelly' works, since the prevailing wind is from the Southwest. The earliest known industrial works in the area was in about 1810, when copper smelting was started by the Bristol Brass Company. The flue up the hillside to the chimney at the top of the hill is believed to have been built later to give good draught conditions for the furnaces. There were many works along the River Avon, such as the Netham Chemical Works, Bristol's largest Alkali Works, started in the 1840s. Next door was the Sheldon Bush Lead Works. The River provided the means for moving raw materials in from coastal and inland sites and finished products out. Clay from the Isle of Wight and from Poole was used by Anthony Ammatt to make pottery in Crew's Hole between 1812 and 1819. Another industry was barge building and there was a slipway near to the old Lamb Inn. Somewhere in Crew's Hole there was a bottle-glassworks, for in the Bristol Journal of 4th October 1766 it was offered for sale by auction. There was considerable industrial activity during the 19th century and the following is a paraphrase of an 1883 article about the Netham Chemical Works, first printed in Bristol Times and Mirror. 'These works which are situated at Crews Hole are very extensive. In fact they cover more ground than any other manufactory in the neighbourhood. When we say that nearly 40 acres are required for the purpose of this business, that upon this there is built over a mile of shedding and about 400 workpeople are employed, a tolerably good idea of the concern may be gathered at once. The works are the property of a limited company of which Mr Charles Thomas, JP is chairman. It started in 1850 and took over the business carried on by Mr Stephen Cox who, with Mr Score, a well-known chemist in Bristol traded under the name of Cox and Score. There are not a great number of shareholders and most are leading Bristol citizens. At the present time the alkali trade has received a severe check and many similar works have closed. Chemical works are not particularly inviting to look at and Netham is no exception. Here there are no palatial buildings. It is all hard grimy reality. The huge mounds of refuse that put one in mind of miniature mountains, the tall brick chimneys, the great wooden structures black with creosote that rise here and there like castles, the long rows of shedding, have nothing of the poetical about them.' The tour of the works was conducted by a Mr Windus. The first stop was where raw materials were landed, principally pyrites, salt, coal and limestone. The writer stated: 'The works are favourably situated and have a frontage both on the Avon and the Feeder which join just in front of the premises. Barges bringing goods used in the manufacturing come right up to the wharves and discharge their cargoes. There are 3 wharves, each provided with dpuble acting steam cranes, each capable of lifting 1 ton at a time. They hoist the materials to an overhead tramway where it is deposited in trollies and conveyed to where it is desired. The overhead tramway system runs right round the works and ground tramways as well, indeed everything in this scheme is perfect. Men run the trams along with the greatest of ease and the saving of labour must be immense.' Details of the various processes were then described. The pyrites, imported from Spain, were used for the manufacture of sulphuric acid. At the time of the visit the manufacture of alkali was undergoing changes, so the buildings were mostly temporary wooden ones. The Spanish pyrites were 50% sulphur and were piled in large heaps where the big lumps were broken up ready to be burnt in the kilns. A hundred kilns were alight at the time and capable of treating 200 tons of pyrites a week. The heat had to be regular, not intense, but steady. The fumes produced were conveyed into great leaden chambers where steam was introduced and sulphuric acid was condensed. The steam came from 20 large boilers of Galloway make, each 30ft long. There were vitriol chambers and towers for condensing. Vitriol was concentrated by means of Glover towers, built of wood and iron stages with linings of brick and lead. There were three chimneys towering high above, 2 being 300 feet high and one 200 feet. The visitors passed over wooden bridges from the pyrites burning process to where the residual cinders were stored. These were later sent to South Wales for the extraction of copper. Each of the storage arches contained 400-500 tons of cinders. Next to this was where the salt cake or sulphate
PUPPY!
PUPPY!
This is my adorable puppy. I will do a 10 facts about her. :) (Not the best picture, but she was standing next to me breathing on me when I was picking a picture, so...) 1. She is the runt. 2. She is 13 years old, and is in pretty good health for her age. Her biggest problem is paralyzed vocal chords, which makes it hard for her to breathe. :( 3. She used to harass garter snakes constantly, always getting harmless bites on the nose. 4. I've heard countless people remark that she is the best looking lab they've ever seen. Perfect proportions and such an exquisite, unforgettable face. 5. She is missing teeth, because once she got hit in the face by a metal baseball bat. It was an accident, but it must have been painful. 6. She hates thunder. 7. She will eat anything. 8. She ripped a ligament in her leg, but went against the odds when it other leg's ligament didn't rip in the six months after the surgery. 9. She hogs the bed, not that she's allowed in it. Or even in my room. 10. She used to know SO many commands and words (like "ball", "frisbee", "treat" - that kind of thing), but now she either can't hear them or pretends she can't. Or just doesn't remember them. Or something. I could go on and on with facts. She's a very interesting pup and we all love her dearly. :) She is from a reputable breeder, but if you're considering a dog, please adopt! It's the best option. They have plenty of purebreds, and mutts are great dogs, too. DON'T GET A DOG FROM A PETSTORE, that just supports the incredibly cruel puppy mill industry.

interesting facts about chlorine
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