NAVAJO CARPETS - NAVAJO

Navajo carpets - Casio rugged phone.

Navajo Carpets


navajo carpets
    carpets
  • A large rug, typically an oriental one
  • A thick or soft expanse or layer of something
  • (carpet) cover completely, as if with a carpet; "flowers carpeted the meadows"
  • A floor or stair covering made from thick woven fabric, typically shaped to fit a particular room
  • form a carpet-like cover (over)
  • (carpeting) rug: floor covering consisting of a piece of thick heavy fabric (usually with nap or pile)
    navajo
  • A member of an American Indian people of New Mexico and Arizona
  • The Athabaskan language of this people
  • Navaho: the Athapaskan language spoken by the Navaho
  • Navaho: a member of an Athapaskan people that migrated to Arizona and New Mexico and Utah
  • Navajo is a 1952 documentary film directed by Norman Foster. It was nominated for two Academy Awards for Best Documentary Feature and Best Cinematography.
navajo carpets - Weaving a
Weaving a World: Textiles and the Navajo Way of Seeing
Weaving a World: Textiles and the Navajo Way of Seeing
Navajo weavings, long regarded for their remarkable aesthetics, have never before been investigated from the standpoint of the weaver's process and intent. WEAVING A WORLD explores the patterns and irregularities often overlooked or considered 'flaws' in these beautiful textiles, and it seeks to identify the mythic symbols and historic and personal stories they contain. The inclusion of objects and the use of colour, pattern, and weave variations are found to be significant symbols of the way a weaver thinks about the world. A weaver may pray her way into the centre of the rug, where the most intricate work and colour will appear. Patterns may portray a vision of the world animated by spirits and holy people, recounting the creation of the heavens, the earth, and the loom itself. WEAVING A WORLD includes seventy rugs from the celebrated collection of the Laboratory of Anthropology in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and documentary photographs of today's weaving culture on the reservation. Winner, RMBPA, Trade Book Illustrated, 1997.

87% (18)
Navajo rock formations in scale
Navajo rock formations in scale
Dine' (Navajo) land - Monument Valley. Ho'zho is the term the Dine' use to describe the value, beauty, and harmony of the natural world. A Navajo family lives right behind this large sandstone spire, with horses and a small garden. They seem very much at peace and in tune, with their home. Day five of my 8 day road trip, I left my camp at Betatakin and started making my way for the Cedar Mesa area of Southern Utah, to do some hikes, I had not taken before. I stopped in Kayenta to gas up and try to no avail to find any place in town with block or cubed ice for my ice chest. Things run on "Navajo time" in Navajo country and that is how it should be. No sense being impatient. I found out that things (like the toll booth to Monument Valley), don't always open up when posted but rather operate on a much more relaxed and flexible "Navajo time". It is much better to go with the flow and smile, rather than get frustrated by it. In Kayenta I was driving north on the main street of town, when I saw a horse, accompanied or being harrassed by two border collies, step out on the main street of town and start walking down the middle of the road. I smiled and pulled out my camera; rolled down the window to take the "horse in town" photo, and the horse started toward my truck like I was going to give him a sugar cube. Meanwhile the town police vehicle, having spotted the potential traffic problem, made its way south, toward me, the horse, and the escort dogs, so I thought I had better get moving. In my rear view mirror, I could see the "Navajo solution" to the horse problem. The police turned on their flashing lights, hit the road siren briefly, and escorted the horse off the main street, without ever leaving their patrol car. LOVE IT! I had driven through Monument Valley many times over the year but must confess I had never slowed down and taken the time to do the 17 mile dirt road loop through the best rock forms in the monument and where John Ford and a young actor named John Wayne, made so many of their western movies including one of my favorites filmed in 1949 "She wore a Yellow Ribbon". The list of movies filmed in Monument Valley on Navajo land is impressive (close to 50). Here is a sampling: 1939 Stagecoach; 1949 She Wore A Yellow Ribbon; 1962 How the West was Won; 1969 Easy Rider; 1983 National Lampoon's Vacations (Chevy Chase running across the landscape); and in 1993 Forrest Gump with the classic "jogger on the endless highway scene". The Navajo reservation is the largest by far in the U.S. and the tiny Hopi Indian reservation is a tiny island WITHIN the Navajo reservation. Both tribes poke barbs and fun of each other. I have heard the Navajo refer to their Hopi neighbors as the "hopeless" tribe. The Navajo are also fiercely independent. The entire state of Arizona does not recognize daylight savings time, but just to show their indifference to conformity and the state of Arizona - - the Navajo do switch to daylight savings time (perhaps that is part of the confusion of when things open and close on "Navajo time"). After leaving Monument Valley, I got gas and block ice at Mexican Hat. I also ate a great late lunch at a cafe next to the San Juan River (Navajo stew; Indian fry bread; and a big vanilla milk shake). They let me charge my camera battery at the cafe while I finished my meal and played a round of pool. After Mexican Hat I headed up Butler Wash on the east side of the interesting Comb Ridge rock formation. There I took two "hot weather" hikes. The first to a petroglyph panel called by most: The Procession Panel. After that hike I went a short distance up the Butler Wash road and took a hike up the canyon and onto the Comb Ridge to the Monarch Cave cliff dwelling. This was one of my favorite hikes of the entire road trip. Beautiful little hike and the globemallow carpeted the canyon walls. After the two Comb Ridge hikes and a long day of driving from Betatakin, I decided that after sleeping in my truck for four nights, I need to "treat myself" to a motel room for a couple of nights. I drove up to Blanding and got a nice simple motel room for two nights, with plans to leave my room early Monday morning and take a 7 mile hike down Kane Gulch and Grand Gulch to the mouth of Todie Canyon, then back out the same way. That was the plan and that is what I did. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ May 12th through May 19th - - I traveled 9 states in 8 days, camping, driving back roads, visiting scenic and historic sites, and taking some great day hikes. These are some of the photographs from this solo "road trip". Day One: Home in Eastern Washington; Mountain Home, Idaho; Owyhee, Nevada and a very cold night camped at Wild Horse Crossing south of Mountain City, Nevada. Day two: NEVADA - - Mountain City; Elko; Wells; Ely (through a snow storm); Panaca. UTAH - - Enterprise, Veyo, to a warm and s
John Ford point spires
John Ford point spires
Dine' (Navajo) land - Monument Valley. Ho'zho is the term the Dine' use to describe the value, beauty, and harmony of the natural world. These red rock spires mark one of several pulloff spurs along the 17 mile dirt road loop through Monument Valley. It is called John Ford point. John Ford made western movies famous with many of his films set and filmed in Monument Valley. He employeed and befriended the Navajo with his movie making and was well liked by most of the Navajo. It was John Ford, who launched John Wayne's movie career with the movie "Stagecoach" filmed at Monument Valley. Day five of my 8 day road trip, I left my camp at Betatakin and started making my way for the Cedar Mesa area of Southern Utah, to do some hikes, I had not taken before. I stopped in Kayenta to gas up and try to no avail to find any place in town with block or cubed ice for my ice chest. Things run on "Navajo time" in Navajo country and that is how it should be. No sense being impatient. I found out that things (like the toll booth to Monument Valley), don't always open up when posted but rather operate on a much more relaxed and flexible "Navajo time". It is much better to go with the flow and smile, rather than get frustrated by it. In Kayenta I was driving north on the main street of town, when I saw a horse, accompanied or being harrassed by two border collies, step out on the main street of town and start walking down the middle of the road. I smiled and pulled out my camera; rolled down the window to take the "horse in town" photo, and the horse started toward my truck like I was going to give him a sugar cube. Meanwhile the town police vehicle, having spotted the potential traffic problem, made its way south, toward me, the horse, and the escort dogs, so I thought I had better get moving. In my rear view mirror, I could see the "Navajo solution" to the horse problem. The police turned on their flashing lights, hit the road siren briefly, and escorted the horse off the main street, without ever leaving their patrol car. LOVE IT! I had driven through Monument Valley many times over the year but must confess I had never slowed down and taken the time to do the 17 mile dirt road loop through the best rock forms in the monument and where John Ford and a young actor named John Wayne, made so many of their western movies including one of my favorites filmed in 1949 "She wore a Yellow Ribbon". The list of movies filmed in Monument Valley on Navajo land is impressive (close to 50). Here is a sampling: 1939 Stagecoach; 1949 She Wore A Yellow Ribbon; 1962 How the West was Won; 1969 Easy Rider; 1983 National Lampoon's Vacations (Chevy Chase running across the landscape); and in 1993 Forrest Gump with the classic "jogger on the endless highway scene". The Navajo reservation is the largest by far in the U.S. and the tiny Hopi Indian reservation is a tiny island WITHIN the Navajo reservation. Both tribes poke barbs and fun of each other. I have heard the Navajo refer to their Hopi neighbors as the "hopeless" tribe. The Navajo are also fiercely independent. The entire state of Arizona does not recognize daylight savings time, but just to show their indifference to conformity and the state of Arizona - - the Navajo do switch to daylight savings time (perhaps that is part of the confusion of when things open and close on "Navajo time"). After leaving Monument Valley, I got gas and block ice at Mexican Hat. I also ate a great late lunch at a cafe next to the San Juan River (Navajo stew; Indian fry bread; and a big vanilla milk shake). They let me charge my camera battery at the cafe while I finished my meal and played a round of pool. After Mexican Hat I headed up Butler Wash on the east side of the interesting Comb Ridge rock formation. There I took two "hot weather" hikes. The first to a petroglyph panel called by most: The Procession Panel. After that hike I went a short distance up the Butler Wash road and took a hike up the canyon and onto the Comb Ridge to the Monarch Cave cliff dwelling. This was one of my favorite hikes of the entire road trip. Beautiful little hike and the globemallow carpeted the canyon walls. After the two Comb Ridge hikes and a long day of driving from Betatakin, I decided that after sleeping in my truck for four nights, I need to "treat myself" to a motel room for a couple of nights. I drove up to Blanding and got a nice simple motel room for two nights, with plans to leave my room early Monday morning and take a 7 mile hike down Kane Gulch and Grand Gulch to the mouth of Todie Canyon, then back out the same way. That was the plan and that is what I did. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ May 12th through May 19th - - I traveled 9 states in 8 days, camping, driving back roads, visiting scenic and historic sites, and taking some great day hikes. These are some of the photographs from this solo &

navajo carpets
navajo carpets
Navajo Weaving Today
The tradition of weaving textiles and rugs among the Navajo people in the Southwest is glimpsed in its present form in this new pictorial study. The regional styles long associated with Navajo blankets and rugs continue to evolve today and the sections of this book present the contemporary results through hundreds of beautiful all photographs and text identifying many of the weavers. The new styles of Burntwater, Wide Ruins, Ganado, Crystal, Chinle, Two Grey Hills, Teec Nos Pos, Western Reservation and Shiprock area designs show continuing talent among today's Navajo weavers. There is also a section devoted to special purpose and fancy weavings including saddle blankets, round, double and two-faced weaves and multiples designs. One must conclude that the quality and diversity of Navajo weavings is at a high level today.

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