AIRPLANE PROPELLER REPAIR - AIRPLANE PROPELLER

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Airplane Propeller Repair


airplane propeller repair
    airplane propeller
  • a propeller that rotates to push against air
    repair
  • Fix or mend (a thing suffering from damage or a fault)
  • Make good (such damage) by fixing or repairing it
  • restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken; "She repaired her TV set"; "Repair my shoes please"
  • a formal way of referring to the condition of something; "the building was in good repair"
  • Put right (a damaged relationship or unwelcome situation)
  • the act of putting something in working order again
airplane propeller repair - Draganfly Innovations
Draganfly Innovations 8x4.5 Counter Rotating Pair Electric RC Helicopter + R/C Airplane Propellers
Draganfly Innovations 8x4.5 Counter Rotating Pair Electric RC Helicopter + R/C Airplane Propellers
Draganfly Innovations counter rotating pair of 8x4.5 RC helicopter & RC model airplane propellers. These counter-rotating rotor blades are perfect for use in twin and multiple motor electric RC helicopters and RC model airplanes. Our 8 x 4.5 props feature a one-piece, composite design. For electric use only. 2 matched propellers: 1 left hand and 1 right hand rotation. One propeller rotates CW (clockwise) and the other prop rotates CCW (counter clockwise). The length is 8 inches and the pitch is 4.5 inches per revolution. Specifications for the Draganfly Innovations DF0845CR pair of counter rotating propellers * Length: 8 inches * Pitch: 4.5 inches per revolution * Type: Counter Rotating Matched Set * Material: 1 Piece Composite * Shaft Diameter: 3 mm (Works with GWS type gearboxes)

83% (12)
Wright EX Vin Fiz
Wright EX Vin Fiz
The Vin Fiz - the First U. S. Transcontinental Flight Calbraith Perry ("Cal") Rodgers, an inexperienced 32-year-old pilot, in 1911 made the first transcontinental flight across the United States. He reached Pasadena, California, on November 5, 1911, and Long Beach, California, on December 10, flying between Sheepshead Bay, near New York City, New York, and the West Coast in a Wright EX biplane. He carried the first transcontinental mail pouch and was accompanied on the ground by a support crew that repaired and rebuilt the plane after its numerous rough landings and crashes. Rodgers was the grandson of Matthew Perry. He was an excellent football player, yachtsman, and automobile and motorcycle racer before becoming a pilot, all in spite of deafness that resulted from a childhood bout of scarlet fever. Somewhat of a risk-taker, Rogers had taken only about 90 minutes of flying instruction from Al Welsh in June 1911, at the Wright School in Dayton, Ohio, before attempting a solo flight. He carried out the first aerial photography of industrial plants and in August 1911, won an $11,000 prize in an international air endurance contest held in Chicago. He also was the first private citizen to purchase a Wright "aeroplane," a slightly modified version of a standard Wright Flyer EX (for Exhibition). The $50,000 prize that renowned publisher William Randolph Hearst offered to the first pilot to fly across the United States within 30 days undoubtedly helped motivate Rodgers to tackle this formidable challenge. Air flight was new to the nation. There were no airports or aircraft mechanics along the way and no air navigation maps, control towers or beacons to warn of hazards or guide the pilot. Rodgers would have to follow railroad tracks, recognize landmarks, and talk with his ground crew during periods on the ground. Also, the venture would be expensive, and Rodgers needed a sponsor. J. Ogden Armour, a Chicago meat packer, was willing to sponsor Rodgers in return for advertising his new grape soft drink "Vin Fiz." Rodgers printed Vin Fiz on the rudder and under-wing areas of the plane, and Armour paid him three to five dollars for each mile flown, providing a total of $23,000. Armour also provided and outfitted a three-car support train, which would prove vital to Rodgers' success. This train was loaded with a crew, including his wife, his mother, a close friend, two mechanics, and two assistants as well as supplies, fuel, repair parts to rebuild the plane, and even spare engines. One car had a much-needed repair shop, and the crew had the capability to rebuild the aircraft at least twice if necessary. All cars advertised the sponsor's product--Vin Fiz. The Wright brothers' biplane that Rodgers flew was made with relatively light materials: a spruce airframe that was covered with muslin and a small 35-horsepower (26-kilowatt) engine. The plane had two eight-foot (2.4-meter) push-propellers driven by a chain-drive transmission and could fly at 45 to 60 miles per hour (72 to 97 kilometers per hour). The Vin Fiz had no instruments, other than the reported use of a shoelace to indicate vertical and lateral motion, no heater, and no navigational aids. But with what proved to be considerable foresight, Rodgers had crutches strapped to a wing. Rogers took off from Sheepshead Bay, New York, at 4:30 p.m. on September 17, 1911. He followed railroad tracks and avoided mountains, storms, and other hazards. Along the way, he landed around 70 times, which included at least 16 crashes some that put him in the hospital. Damage to the Vin Fiz was so extensive that the plane had to be rebuilt at least twice. Only a very few pieces of the original Vin Fiz made it all the way a vertical rudder, a couple of wing struts, and possibly the original engine oil pan. Forty-nine days later, on November 5, Rodgers landed in Pasadena, California, He had missed Hearst's deadline by 19 days. So that he could say he had reached the Pacific Ocean, he took off again on November 12, to cover the remaining 20 miles (32 kilometers) to the ocean, only to be forced down twice, once suffering a broken ankle. But on December 10, 1911, he flew on to the beach at Long Beach, California, and taxied the Vin Fiz into the Pacific Ocean. The entire trip of approximately 4,000 miles (6,437 kilometers) (authorities differ on the exact number of miles) had taken 84 days, although only about 82 hours were spent aloft! Rodgers' determination and thorough preparation for the flight enabled him to be the first to make his way across the country by air, even though he missed the time deadline for the $50,000.00 prize. The public recognized his triumph over life-threatening challenges. The number of onlookers grew from a handful of people wishing him well at his initial takeoff, to newspaper reporters and crowds cheering him on as he crossed the continent, all the way to national celebrity status, with some 20,000 witnessing his Novem
Grumman F6F Hellcat
Grumman F6F Hellcat
The Grumman F6F Hellcat was originally conceived as an advanced version of the U.S. Navy's then current front-line fighter, the F4F Wildcat. The Wildcat's intended replacement, the Vought F4U Corsair, first flown in 1940, was showing great promise, but development was slowed by problems, including the crash of the prototype. As a precaution against possible delays in the Corsair reaching the fleet, in June 1941, the Navy asked Grumman to develop an improved version of the Wildcat. It had been designed in the 1930s and its performance was not up to the standard of the newer fighters. Clearly the most pressing need in the Wildcat was a larger engine to boost performance. A bigger powerplant, however, would require the use of a larger propeller, which in turn necessitated a taller landing gear for increased ground clearance. More power also called for more wing area, and an increase in the area of the vertical and horizontal tail surfaces. The wing would also need to be lowered from the Wildcat's mid-fuselage position to accommodate the newer hydraulically-operated landing gear, which would replace its predecessor's obsolete manual system. What Grumman proposed to the Navy, therefore, was an entirely new fighter. The advanced Wildcat had turned, by a process of evolution, into the Hellcat. The F6F Hellcat still bore a family resemblance, however, to its predecessor and there was little that was revolutionary in its design. Simplicity was a hallmark of Grumman aircraft. Known components were used, and ease of manufacture was always a priority. Grumman chief engineer William Schwendler was an advocate of building components to twice the strength required in specifications. This practice would make the F6F a tough, uncomplicated, easy-to-manufacture aircraft. The Hellcat was legendary for its ruggedness and it was even jokingly rumored to be made of steel. This story arose from the fact that, because of wartime shortages, Grumman had been unable to acquire the structural steel to construct the new factory in which the Hellcats would be produced. In a resourceful move, Grumman general manager Jake Swirbul was able to purchase some of the needed steel from the scrapped remains of a New York City elevated railway. The joke was that the steel had not gone to making the factory, but in to making Hellcats. The XF6F-1 Hellcat first flew in June of 1942 with a 1,600-hp Wright R-2600 Cyclone engine. It proved to be easy to fly, with no bad characteristics. In 1944 Leroy Grumman would, on a whim, successfully fly a production Hellcat, even though he had not been in a cockpit in many years. Speed and rate-of-climb were not up to expectations, however, so Grumman replaced the Wright engine with the 2,000-hp Pratt & Whitney R-2800-8 Double Wasp, 18-cylinder engine. Like the Hellcat, the R-2800 was rugged and easily maintained. It would also power the Corsair and is considered to be one of the best reciprocating engines ever produced. At the same time a Hamiliton Standard Hydromatic propeller replaced the Curtiss propeller. The re-engined Hellcat was designated the XF6F-3. Grumman was so confident of the Hellcat that production started in October 1942, while the prototype was still in testing. This gamble paid off and the Navy accepted the first production F6F-3 in January 1943. The aircraft had become more important than ever with the continued delay of the Corsair. The battles of 1942 had also given navy pilots first-hand experience with Japan's Mitsubishi A6M Zero (see NASM collection), whose capabilities came as quite a shock for the Americans, and the Wildcat's shortcomings were now readily apparent. The Navy desperately needed the increased performance of the Hellcat to combat the Zero's dominance. The Hellcat would prove superior to its main Japanese opponent in most performance categories, especially at high altitude. The only advantage that the Zero retained throughout the war was its legendary turning ability at slower speeds. This advantage disappeared, however, at speeds above 200 knots, because of aerodynamic forces on the Japanese fighter's controls. The lightly armored Zeros were also no match for the Hellcat's rugged construction and six .50 caliber guns. Not until late in the war would Japanese aircraft such as the Kawanishi N1K George (see NASM collection) challenge the Hellcat. But they were never available in sufficient quantity and the Zero remained the most numerous of Japanese fighters. Because of Grumman's foresight in starting production early, Hellcats began rolling off the assembly line immediately and construction continued at an ever-increasing rate. Hellcat production was all the more remarkable considering that many of the Grumman employees had never built airplanes before. Much of the credit for the remarkable rate at which F6Fs were produced goes to the management abilities of Grumman and Swirbul. They fostered a family atmosphere and provided many modern services for their worker

airplane propeller repair