AIR TRANS FLIGHT SCHEDULE - AIR TRANS

Air Trans Flight Schedule - Flight Of The Conchords Tour Dates.

Air Trans Flight Schedule


air trans flight schedule
    flight schedule
  • An entertaining work of paperback function.
    air trans
  • AirTran Airways is an American low-cost airline. A subsidiary of AirTran Holdings, AirTran operates over 1,000 daily flights, primarily in the eastern and midwestern United States.

Beechcraft S18D Twin Beech CF-BKN
Beechcraft S18D Twin Beech CF-BKN
Serial Number: 177 Registration: N55681 Markings: Prairie Airways Ltd., 1938. The Wichita Beacon for Friday, July 8,1938 asked if its readers were puzzled by the two new red Beech 18's at the Beech factory with large letters on their fuselages. The article revealed that they were Canadian registration letters and the craft were being built for Prairie Airways to carry passengers and mail. The first, CF-BKN, c/n 177 left the next day for delivery while the second, CF-BKO, c/n 178 was due to be delivered as soon as the flight tests were done, which turned out to be July 16. In April 1938, Prairie Airways received the first feeder line airmail contract issued by the Canadian Post Office Department. The low bid was based on estimates using the two S18D's on Saskatchewan routes that extended from Prince Albert to North Battleford, south to Saskatoon and Moose Jaw, and then connected with Trans-Canada Airlines at Regina. The two aircraft were then ordered through Canadian distributor, Aircraft Industries of Canada, Montreal at a cost of $36,750 each. Both Beech monoplanes were powered by Jacobs L-6MB engines of 330 hp that turned Hamilton Standard controllable propellers. The aircraft were finished in bright Teak Red with a blue Beechcraft fuselage birdstripe edged in cream, Prairie Airways name over the cabin door and a PAL (Prairie Airways Limited) logo on each side of the nose. The interior was trimmed in blue with seating for seven passengers in the cabin in addition to the two pilots up front, required for scheduled passenger operations. As indicated by the S for seaplane, in the S18D designation, the aircraft were designed and built by Beech to be operated on skis, floats, or wheels. Prairie Airways however, chose not to seek approval from the Canadian Dept. of Transportation to operate it on floats and during its 7 years in Canada it was never mounted on floats (nor was its sister ship, CF-BKN). In fact, by 1939, the registration certificate was referring to it as a Model 18D without the prefix S. It was approved for skis but for most operations it stayed on wheels. In late 1941, Canadian Pacific Air Lines (CPAL), acquired Prairie Airways and its five aircraft (two Beechcraft 18D, a Barkley-Grow T8P-1, a Cessna Airmaster and a Waco ZQC-6) for a little over half a million dollars. Donald M. Bain in his book, Canadian Pacific Air Lines, notes that Prairie Airways found their 18D's, “to be extremely unreliable and the Jacobs engines were referred to derisively as ‘Shakey Jakes' ”. There is more available on early operations at Prairie Airways and problems with engines, landing gear, and accidents. Perhaps because of this, CPAL sold both 18D's, in July 1944, to Transportes Aereos Centro-Americanos, TACA de Venezuela of Costa Rica. Richard W. Ryan who was the first manager at Prairie Airways, "several hundred Moose Jaw people were at the airport to see the new aircraft [CF-BKN] arrive. We had phoned after clearing customs at Pembina and had given our approximate arrival time. As we stepped off the aircraft we were given a great welcome. I believe this was one of the happiest days in my life. About two weeks later we took delivery of our second aircraft [CF-BKO] and we were ready to commence operations. Our first regular flight was operated August 2, 1938. During the first month we didn't carry passengers in order that our crews might first become familiar with the route and the aircraft. We had worked out a schedule, which we found we could maintain without difficulty. During the first eight months of our operation the aircraft performed well and we gradually built up our passenger traffic. In the late fall and winter there were a few days when we could not operate on account of bad weather but this was to be expected on a route not equipped for instrument flying. There were other days when one or more of the northern city airports were below limits. These points were passed up but we operate into the airports that were within our limits. Early in 1939, we encountered cylinder and piston troubles in our engines. This trouble seldom caused a complete engine failure but the engine commenced malfunctioning and had to be shut down. Since the aircraft had good single engine performance there was no danger but the aircraft had to be called back to our main base at Moose Jaw where the engine was changed. The failed engine had to be torn down and the defective parts replaced. As this was happening far too frequently I phoned Mr. Jacobs in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, where his plant was located, and advised him of our trouble. He pointed that our company apparently was the only one having trouble with his engines. I found this hard to believe so I phoned Walter Beech in Wichita and told him about our problem also told him what Jacobs had said. ‘Ridiculous' said Walter, ‘I'll say you are not the only company having troubles with his engines. All the people who bought my aircraft with his engines are having troub
Lockheed 1049F-55-96, "Constellation"
Lockheed 1049F-55-96, "Constellation"
In June 1938, Lockheed began design work on an airliner to satisfy a Transcontinental Western & Air (later Trans-World Airlines) (TWA), requirement for a non-stop transcontinental airliner with a 3,500-mile range and 6,000 lb. payload capability. Construction of a prototype began in 1940. The U.S. was soon involved in the Second World War and all transport production was directed to military needs and consequently the prototype first flew on January 9, 1943, as a military aircraft. Hydraulic-powered controls were used, full feathering and reversing propellers were also installed. First known by its civil designator as Model 049, it soon became better known during wartime by its military designation, the C-69 Constellation. Improvements were steadily made, beginning with the L-649, which was the first Constellation built as a commercial type and the L-749 which was the long-range version of the 649. The next stage in development led to the L-1049 Super Constellation. The first prototype Super Constellation was a "stretched" version of the original Model 049 (C-69), modified by lengthening the fuselage from 95’ 2" to 113’ 7", adding more fuel capacity, more powerful engines, higher gross weight, and increasing its tourist-class seating from 69 to 92. These L-1049 aircraft were powered by four 2700 hp Wright engines. The prototype aircraft was first flown on October 13, 1950. The production version of the Model L-1049, of which fourteen were built for Eastern Airlines, and ten for TWA, ended up with a strengthened fuselage, stiffened outer wing panels and rectangular windows instead of the Constellation’s round ones. This production version was first flown on July 14, 1951, and the type entered service on December 7, 1951, with Eastern Airlines (EAL). The last Model 1049 produced was delivered in September 1952. Passenger accommodations on the 1049 varied - 88 for Eastern; 65 over water or 75 domestic for TWA, with adaptation to 102 in high density configuration. The flight crew consisted of three, with two cabin attendants. The Model 1049 was followed by an A version (military WV-2, WV-3, and RC-121D) the B version (USN R7V-1, USAF RC-121C, the presidential VC-121E), and the C version, the first commercial transport certificated with turbo-compound engines. These Double Cyclone Wright engines had three "blow-down" turbines, which converted the heat energy of exhaust gases into additional power, with a 20% reduction in fuel consumption. The engine produced 3,250 h.p. for take-off for which the aircraft weight had been increased to 133,000 lb. The Model 1049C, Turbo-Cyclone-powered Super Constellation began flight trials on February 17, 1953. A convertible model, the 1049D was built for Seaboard and Western Airlines in 1954. They were fitted with reinforced flooring and they had main deck cargo loading doors on the part side of the fuselage, fore and aft of the wings. They could carry either 18 tons of freight or up to 104 passengers. Maximum take—off weight was 135,400 lb. A Model 1049E was delivered between May 1954 and April 1955 which was identical to the 1049C but with the increased take-off and landing weight of the 1049D. Next on the model list was the Model 1049F, which was Lockheed’s designation for 33 C-121C cargo/personnel transports built for the USAF and fitted with stronger landing gear. The F was followed by a "G" model which was determined to be the most successful version of the Super Constellation. It was powered by 3,400 h.p. engines, it had longer range than the E, and the maximum take-off weight was increased to 137,500 lb. with some models modified to 140,000 lb. Often known as Super Gs, 42 of these aircraft were delivered to domestic carriers (20 to TWA, 10 to EAL, and 4 to NW), and 50 to foreign carriers. The final version to the Super Constellation was the Model 1049H, a combination of Model 1049D, and the convertible and improved Model 1049G. The Super Constellation and its derivatives represent, along with the Douglas DC-7, the ultimate step in the development of longer range, more capacity and more powerful piston-engined aircraft to meet the needs of both commercial and military aviation. Eastern Air Lines, the first airline to order Super Constellations, introduced the type on its New York-Miami route on December 15, 1951. It was able to take advantage of the 1049s additional capacity to absorb an increased holiday seasonal demand. A decade later on April 30, 1961, Eastern inaugurated its revolutionary air shuttle, no-reservation service, Washington-New York-Boston with Super Constellations. Incidentally, as it turns out, the last use of the Super Constellations by a major U.S. domestic airline was a backup for the shuttle until February 1968. TWA, a co-sponsor with EAL on the design of the Super Constellation, first used the Model 1049 on its domestic network in September 1952, and when it received the higher performance "C&quo

air trans flight schedule
Comments