AIRFARE WAR : WAR

Airfare War : Airfares To Peru.

Airfare War


airfare war
    airfare
  • The price of a passenger ticket for travel by aircraft
  • (Airfares) An airliner is a large fixed-wing aircraft for transporting passengers and cargo. Such planes are owned by airlines.
  • A fare is the fee paid by a passenger allowing him or her to make use of a public transport system: rail, bus, taxi, etc. In the case of air transport, the term airfare is often used.
  • the fare charged for traveling by airplane
    war
  • the waging of armed conflict against an enemy; "thousands of people were killed in the war"
  • a legal state created by a declaration of war and ended by official declaration during which the international rules of war apply; "war was declared in November but actual fighting did not begin until the following spring"
  • A state of competition, conflict, or hostility between different people or groups
  • A state of armed conflict between different nations or states or different groups within a nation or state
  • A particular armed conflict
  • make or wage war
airfare war - WAR
WAR
WAR
In WAR, Sebastian Junger (The Perfect Storm) turns his brilliant and empathetic eye to the reality of combat--the fear, the honor, and the trust among men in an extreme situation whose survival depends on their absolute commitment to one another. His on-the-ground account follows a single platoon through a 15-month tour of duty in the most dangerous outpost in Afghanistan's Korengal Valley. Through the experiences of these young men at war, he shows what it means to fight, to serve, and to face down mortal danger on a daily basis.

Evan Thomas and Sebastian Junger: Author One-on-One
In this Amazon exclusive, we brought together authors Sebastian Junger and Evan Thomas and asked them to interview each other.

Evan Thomas is one of the most respected historians and journalists writing today. He is the author of The War Lovers. Sebastian Junger is an internationally acclaimed author and a contributing editor to Vanity Fair, and has been awarded a National Magazine Award and an SAIS Novartis Prize for journalism. He is the author of War. Read on to see Sebastian Junger and Evan Thomas talk about their books.



Evan Thomas: War really is hell in your book. And yet it seems to captivate some of the men who fight it. Why?
Sebastian Junger: War is hell, as the saying goes--but it isn't only that. It's a lot of other things, too--most of them delivered in forms that are way more pure and intense than what is available back home. The undeniable hellishness of war forces men to bond in ways that aren't necessary--or even possible-- in civilian society. The closest thing to it might be the parent-child bond, but that is not reciprocal. Children are generally not prepared to die for their parents, whereas the men in a platoon of combat infantry for the most part are prepared to do that for each other. For a lot of men, the security of being enclosed by a group like that apparently outweighs the terrors of being in combat. During World War II, wounded soldiers kept going AWOL from the rear-base hospitals in order to rejoin their units on the front line. Clearly, for those men, rejoining their comrades was more important than the risk of death.
I'm curious about the reactions of foot soldiers in previous wars--the Civil War, the Spanish-American War. Are there letters from soldiers describing their anguish at being separated from their comrades? Or is this a modern phenomenon?
Thomas: In the Spanish-American War, Teddy Roosevelt made a cult out of his band of brothers, the Rough Riders, with the twist that he was bringing together gentlemen and cowboys to be true Americans. It was a romantic ideal but largely realized in the short (several week) war they fought--two battles, about a 15 percent casualty rate. The anguish you speak of was felt by the Rough Riders who were left behind--there was no room on the transports for roughly a third of Roosevelt's troopers, and they had to stay behind in Florida. Roosevelt wrote of them weeping over being separated from their comrades and missing out on the fight.
Roosevelt's war lust was sated by the Spanish-American War--for a time. He was not a notably bellicose president ("Talk softly but carry a big stick"). But when World War I came, he was almost pathologically driven to get back into the fight. He badgered President Wilson to let him raise a division. (Wilson, not wanting to create a martyr, said no.) Do you think the brotherhood of combat is in some ways addictive? What is it like for the soldiers and marines coming home?
Junger: It's amazing to see these same themes played out war after war. Politicians seize war for themselves, in some ways, and the public certainly holds them accountable for it--but the men who actually do the fighting are extraordinarily conflicted about it all. Only one man in the platoon I was with chose to leave the army after the deployment--Brendan O'Byrne, a main character in my book and now someone I consider a good friend. A few weeks ago we were hanging out with a family I know, and the talk turned to how rough the fighting was in Afghanistan. The mother, a woman in her thirties, asked Brendan if there was anything he missed about the experience. Brendan looked at her and said, without any irony, "Yes, almost all of it." I think what Brendan meant was that he missed an existence where every detail mattered--whether you tied your shoelaces, whether you cleaned your rifle--and you never had to question the allegiance of your friends. As Brendan said at another point, "There are guys in the platoon who straight-up hate each other-- but they'd all die for each other." Once they've been exposed to that, it's very hard for these guys to go back to a seemingly meaningless and ill-defined civilian life.
What happened to the men after they returned from their adventures with Roosevelt? Where did their lives lead them?
Thomas: The Rough Riders seem to have had endless reunions--but nothing like the PTSD so widely reported today. But perhaps that was because they were only fighting for about a month--a "splendid little war," as diplomat John Hay called it, apparently without irony. In The War Lovers, I was looking at another kind of camaraderie--the bond of men who want to get the country into war, who think that war will somehow restore the nation to spiritual greatness. Roosevelt and his best friend, Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, believed that America at the end of the 19th century had become "overcivilized"--that young men were turning soft and needed to somehow stir "the wolf rising in the heart," as Roosevelt put it. "All the great races have been fighting races," he said. It is significant that Roosevelt and Lodge, who pushed America to go to war with Spain in 1898, had written about war a great deal but never seen it. President William McKinley resisted; he had, as he noted, seen "the dead piled up at Antietam" in the Civil War. But the hawks in America were able to roll the doves, not for the last time.
Before The War Lovers I wrote Sea of Thunder, a book about the last naval battle of World War II, Leyte Gulf. I interviewed a number of survivors from the USS Johnston, a destroyer sunk in the battle after an unbelievably brave fight against superior forces. About 220 men went in the water but only about half of them were rescued. Because of a series of mistakes by the navy, they were left in the water for two and half days. The sharks came on the first night. For a long time, the survivors did not talk much about it. But then, after Tom Brokaw wrote The Greatest Generation, they began having reunions and speaking--almost compulsively--bout their experiences. The recollections are often harrowing. Yet even years later, when the veterans compiled their recollections in a book of about eighty oral histories, the veterans did not speak of their own fear, with only one exception, as I recall. Somehow acknowledging fear remained a taboo.

In War you write about fear in clinical and fascinating ways. Did you have a hard time getting men to talk about fear?
Junger: Getting the men to talk about fear was very hard because, well, I think they were afraid of it. Their biggest worry seemed to be failing the other men of the platoon in some way, and whenever someone got killed, a common reaction was to search their own actions for blame. They didn't want to believe that a good man could get killed for no reason; someone had to be at fault. During combat, their personal fear effectively got subsumed by the greater anxiety that they would fail to do their job and someone else would get killed. The shame of that would last a lifetime, and they would literally do suicidal things to help platoon mates who were in danger. The classic story of a man throwing himself on a hand grenade--certain death, but an action that will almost certainly save everyone else--is neither a Hollywood cliche nor something that only happened in wars gone by. It is something that happens with regularity, and I don't think it can be explained by "army training" or any kind of suicidal impulse. I think that kind of courage goes to the heart of what it means to be human and to affiliate with others in a kind of transcendent way. Of course, once you have experienced a bond like that, everything else looks pathetic and uninteresting. That may be one reason combat vets have such a hard time returning to society..
My guess is that the survivors of the USS Johnston were more traumatized by the deaths of their comrades than the prospect of their own death. Did any of them speak to that? What were their nightmares about? Has anyone studied the effect of that trauma on their lives--divorce rate, suicide rate, that kind of thing?
Thomas: They certainly described the deaths of their colleagues--who went mad from drinking seawater, or were killed by sharks, or died from untreated wounds or exposure (the seawater was about 86 degrees at night, cold if you spent all night immersed in it). Some just swam away and drowned. In one or two cases, men begged to be put out of their misery and were. There were complicated emotions over the deaths. There wasn't enough room on the rafts for all the men, so when one died, it made room for another. I am sure there was terrible guilt, but I didn't get into it with the survivors I interviewed. I don't think they were studied as a cohort. I think they were expected to go on with their lives, and I think by and large they did.
Nations are changed by war--but somehow, only for a time. We have a way of forgetting the horrors of war, in the need young men (and old men who missed war) have to some experience the greatest challenge to their manhood. This was true in the period I wrote about in The War Lovers, more than three decades after the Civil War: men like Roosevelt and Lodge wanted to somehow experience the glories of war, and not think too hard about the way wars often turn out in unexpected ways. I know in Cuba, where I visited to research The War Lovers, the Cubans don't think of the Americans as their liberators from Spanish rule, but rather as foreign invaders. That's unfair, and in many ways just plain wrong, but not so hard to understand if you put yourself in the shoes of a country occupied by a foreign army. Some things never change.

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War Vets Return to Transformed South Korea
War Vets Return to Transformed South Korea
Former Army Cpl. Fred Brady, a combat medic during the Korean War, said returning to South Korea through the Korea Revisit Program and seeing the impact of his service is part of the healing process. DoD photo by Donna Miles By Donna Miles American Forces Press Service SEOUL, South Korea, Sept. 17, 2010 – When Korean War veteran Fred Brady, now age 84, had last set foot in South Korea, the country was in the throes of a brutal conflict that left devastation at every turn. A combat medic serving with the Army’s 3rd Field Hospital, Brady saw the extent of the destruction first-hand as he followed the fight from the Pusan Perimeter to Taegu, tending to the wounded. This week, Brady and 139 other Korean War veterans got an eye-opening experience as they returned here -- almost all for the first time since the war -- to participate in ceremonies marking the conflict’s 60th anniversary and to see the fruits of their efforts. They’re guests of the South Korean government, which launched the Korea Revisit Program in 1975 to thank Korean War veterans for their sacrifices. Participants pay half of their airfare here, with South Korea’s ministry of patriots and veterans affairs picking up the rest of the tab, along with the costs of lodging, meals, tours and entertainment. In addition to increasing the scope of the program to correspond with 60th anniversary commemorations over the next three years, the South Korean government has announced that it will now pay 30 percent of the airfare and all other costs for veterans’ spouses or companions. “[This is] the Republic of Korea saying, ‘Thank you for all that you did 60 years ago in order for our country to get where it is today,’” said Army Gen. Walter L. “Skip” Sharp, commander of U.S. Forces Korea, Combined Forces Command and United Nations Command. Brady said he’d planned to bring his wife along for the trip, and admitted his children had to talk him into coming after she died in the spring. But as Brady and his fellow veterans attended a lavish banquet earlier this week, where they were showered with thanks by South Korean government and military leaders as well as Sharp, those reservations had long since been forgotten. “This is an absolutely wonderful experience,” said Brady, now a resident of Grand Isle, La. “I feel so many emotions; it’s hard to choose just one to describe it all.” Like Brady, Ben Jaffray, who’d served as an Air Force first lieutenant with the 336th Fighter Interceptor Wing during the war, marveled at South Korea’s transformation since he left here 57 years ago. “The devastation was total,” recalled 80-year-old Jaffray. “What you see here is a miracle.” Jaffray credited the Korean people, whose spirit and drive have built their war-devastated country into the world’s 10th-largest economy with a gross domestic product approaching $1 trillion. “It’s the attitude of the Koreans that’s made it possible. I saw it then and I see it now,” he said. “There’s a level of enthusiasm and joy here.” “I can’t believe what these people have done,” echoed Bob Ellenz of Tipton, Kan., who is making his first visit here since 1951. “I’m dumbfounded,” said the former 8th U.S. Army’s 17th Field Artillery Division soldier. For Charles Gagnon of Port Angeles, Wash., a Navy quartermaster during the war serving under 7th Fleet commander Vice Adm. Alfred Pride, a highlight of the Korea Revisit Program has been the opportunity to reconnect with the Korean people. In addition to visiting the demilitarized zone and South Korean cultural sites this week, Gagnon spent a full day meeting with young South Korean students and sharing stories of his wartime experience here. “It’s absolutely awesome being here,” he said, admitting that he, like Brady, initially had “a lot of reservations” about making the trip. “This is a whole new nation,” he said. “Being able to see it and recognizing that we helped play a part in building it makes me proud.” The veterans reveled at the reception they’ve received throughout their visit. “I’m having a fantastic time,” said Stan Levin of San Diego, a Navy veteran who served on an amphibious assault ship during the war. “They’re treating us like royalty. It’s almost embarrassing.” “This is a wonderful trip,” Ellenz agreed. “I’ve enjoyed it so much; I wouldn’t be surprised if I end up coming back again someday.” As they swapped war stories and explored the transformed South Korea, the veterans also took time to remember their buddies who never made it home from the Land of the Morning Calm. “We all lost friends in the war,” Jaffray said. “Being here and thinking about it, you get a little teary.” “This is all part of a healing process, being here and getting to see this beautiful country,” said Brady. James “Jamie” Wiedhahn, son of a Korean War veteran who helps to coordinate the U.S. Korea Revisit Program, called that emotional reckoning an important part of the experience. “This is an opportunity for the veterans to se
War Vets Return to Transformed South Korea
War Vets Return to Transformed South Korea
Army Gen. Walter L. “Skip” Sharp, commander of U.S. Forces Korea, Combined Forces Command and United Nations Command, chats with James Godfrey, an Army corporal during the Korean War who earned the Distinguished Flying Cross for actions east of the Changjin Reservoir. DoD photo by Donna Miles By Donna Miles American Forces Press Service SEOUL, South Korea, Sept. 17, 2010 – When Korean War veteran Fred Brady, now age 84, had last set foot in South Korea, the country was in the throes of a brutal conflict that left devastation at every turn. A combat medic serving with the Army’s 3rd Field Hospital, Brady saw the extent of the destruction first-hand as he followed the fight from the Pusan Perimeter to Taegu, tending to the wounded. This week, Brady and 139 other Korean War veterans got an eye-opening experience as they returned here -- almost all for the first time since the war -- to participate in ceremonies marking the conflict’s 60th anniversary and to see the fruits of their efforts. They’re guests of the South Korean government, which launched the Korea Revisit Program in 1975 to thank Korean War veterans for their sacrifices. Participants pay half of their airfare here, with South Korea’s ministry of patriots and veterans affairs picking up the rest of the tab, along with the costs of lodging, meals, tours and entertainment. In addition to increasing the scope of the program to correspond with 60th anniversary commemorations over the next three years, the South Korean government has announced that it will now pay 30 percent of the airfare and all other costs for veterans’ spouses or companions. “[This is] the Republic of Korea saying, ‘Thank you for all that you did 60 years ago in order for our country to get where it is today,’” said Army Gen. Walter L. “Skip” Sharp, commander of U.S. Forces Korea, Combined Forces Command and United Nations Command. Brady said he’d planned to bring his wife along for the trip, and admitted his children had to talk him into coming after she died in the spring. But as Brady and his fellow veterans attended a lavish banquet earlier this week, where they were showered with thanks by South Korean government and military leaders as well as Sharp, those reservations had long since been forgotten. “This is an absolutely wonderful experience,” said Brady, now a resident of Grand Isle, La. “I feel so many emotions; it’s hard to choose just one to describe it all.” Like Brady, Ben Jaffray, who’d served as an Air Force first lieutenant with the 336th Fighter Interceptor Wing during the war, marveled at South Korea’s transformation since he left here 57 years ago. “The devastation was total,” recalled 80-year-old Jaffray. “What you see here is a miracle.” Jaffray credited the Korean people, whose spirit and drive have built their war-devastated country into the world’s 10th-largest economy with a gross domestic product approaching $1 trillion. “It’s the attitude of the Koreans that’s made it possible. I saw it then and I see it now,” he said. “There’s a level of enthusiasm and joy here.” “I can’t believe what these people have done,” echoed Bob Ellenz of Tipton, Kan., who is making his first visit here since 1951. “I’m dumbfounded,” said the former 8th U.S. Army’s 17th Field Artillery Division soldier. For Charles Gagnon of Port Angeles, Wash., a Navy quartermaster during the war serving under 7th Fleet commander Vice Adm. Alfred Pride, a highlight of the Korea Revisit Program has been the opportunity to reconnect with the Korean people. In addition to visiting the demilitarized zone and South Korean cultural sites this week, Gagnon spent a full day meeting with young South Korean students and sharing stories of his wartime experience here. “It’s absolutely awesome being here,” he said, admitting that he, like Brady, initially had “a lot of reservations” about making the trip. “This is a whole new nation,” he said. “Being able to see it and recognizing that we helped play a part in building it makes me proud.” The veterans reveled at the reception they’ve received throughout their visit. “I’m having a fantastic time,” said Stan Levin of San Diego, a Navy veteran who served on an amphibious assault ship during the war. “They’re treating us like royalty. It’s almost embarrassing.” “This is a wonderful trip,” Ellenz agreed. “I’ve enjoyed it so much; I wouldn’t be surprised if I end up coming back again someday.” As they swapped war stories and explored the transformed South Korea, the veterans also took time to remember their buddies who never made it home from the Land of the Morning Calm. “We all lost friends in the war,” Jaffray said. “Being here and thinking about it, you get a little teary.” “This is all part of a healing process, being here and getting to see this beautiful country,” said Brady. James “Jamie” Wiedhahn, son of a Korean War veteran who helps to coordinate the U.S. Korea Revisit Program, called that emotional reckoning an important pa

airfare war
airfare war
The Art of War
If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle....

These are the words of ancient Chinese philosopher Sun Tzu, whose now-classic treatise, The Art of War, was written more than 2,500 years ago. Originally a text for victory on the battlefield, the book has vastly transcended its original purpose.

Here is a seminal work on the philosophy of successful leadership that is as applicable to contemporary business as it is to war. Today many leading American business schools use the text as required reading for aspiring managers, and even Oliver Stone's award-winning film Wall Street cites The Art of War as a guide to those who strive for success.

Now acclaimed novelist James Clavell, for whom Sun Tzu's writing has been an inspiration, gives us a newly edited Art of War. Author of the best-selling Asian saga consisting of Shogun, Tai-Pan, Gai-jin, King Rat, Noble House, and Whirlwind, Clavell first heard about Sun Tzu in Hong Kong in 1977, and since then The Art Of War has been his constant companion--he refers to it frequently in Noble House. He has taken a 1910 translation of the book and clarified it for the contemporary reader. This new edition of The Art Of War is an extraordinary book made even more relevant by an extraordinary editor.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Art of War is the Swiss army knife of military theory--pop out a different tool for any situation. Folded into this small package are compact views on resourcefulness, momentum, cunning, the profit motive, flexibility, integrity, secrecy, speed, positioning, surprise, deception, manipulation, responsibility, and practicality. Thomas Cleary's translation keeps the package tight, with crisp language and short sections. Commentaries from the Chinese tradition trail Sun-tzu's words, elaborating and picking up on puzzling lines. Take the solitary passage: "Do not eat food for their soldiers." Elsewhere, Sun-tzu has told us to plunder the enemy's stores, but now we're not supposed to eat the food? The Tang dynasty commentator Du Mu solves the puzzle nicely, "If the enemy suddenly abandons their food supplies, they should be tested first before eating, lest they be poisoned." Most passages, however, are the pinnacle of succinct clarity: "Lure them in with the prospect of gain, take them by confusion" or "Invincibility is in oneself, vulnerability is in the opponent." Sun-tzu's maxims are widely applicable beyond the military because they speak directly to the exigencies of survival. Your new tools will serve you well, but don't flaunt them. Remember Sun-tzu's advice: "Though effective, appear to be ineffective." --Brian Bruya

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