FLIGHTS FROM LONDON TO BRUSSELS - FLIGHTS FROM LONDON

Flights from london to brussels - Find cheap air tickets.

Flights From London To Brussels


flights from london to brussels
    brussels
  • Brussels (Bruxelles, pronounced ; Brussel, pronounced ), officially the Brussels Region or Brussels-Capital Region (All text and all but one graphic show the English name as Brussels-Capital Region.
  • The capital of Belgium, in the central part of the country; pop. 954,000. The headquarters of the European Commission is located here. Flemish name Brussel
  • Bruxelles: the capital and largest city of Belgium; seat of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization
  • Brussels Cheese, also known as Brusselse Kaas, is made from cow's milk and is considered a table cheese that is used for spreading and snacks. In texture it is smooth, with its taste being sharp and citrusy, with strong and salty bite.
    flights
  • Shoot (wildfowl) in flight
  • (flight) an instance of traveling by air; "flying was still an exciting adventure for him"
  • (flight) fly in a flock; "flighting wild geese"
  • (in soccer, cricket, etc.) Deliver (a ball) with well-judged trajectory and pace
  • (flight) shoot a bird in flight
    london
  • the capital and largest city of England; located on the Thames in southeastern England; financial and industrial and cultural center
  • An industrial city in southeastern Ontario, Canada, north of Lake Erie; pop. 303,165
  • United States writer of novels based on experiences in the Klondike gold rush (1876-1916)
  • The capital of the United Kingdom, in southeastern England on the Thames River; pop. 6,377,000. London, called Londinium, was settled as a river port and trading center shortly after the Roman invasion of ad 43 and has been a flourishing center since the Middle Ages.It is divided administratively into the City of London, which is the country's financial center, and 32 boroughs
  • London is the capital of England and the United Kingdom. It is the largest metropolitan area in the United Kingdom and the largest urban zone in the European Union by most measures.
flights from london to brussels - Frommer's Brussels
Frommer's Brussels and Bruges Day By Day (Frommer's Day by Day - Pocket)
Frommer's Brussels and Bruges Day By Day (Frommer's Day by Day - Pocket)
Brussels & Bruges Day By Day is the perfect pocket guide book for independent travellers providing a practical, colourful format with useful, clear maps and expertly designed tours. The guide highlights the must-see places and offers knowledgeable opinion on where to stay, eat and shop.
Includes special interest tours for the kids, for art lovers, especially surrealist Magritte, Art Nouveau architecture enthusiasts, foodies who enjoy beer and chocolate, and cartoon strip fans.
Details great neighbourhood walking tours around Brussels, exploring Saint-Gery and Sainte-Catherine, the Marolles, Laeken, and Ixelles.
The Best Dining from classic Belgian cuisine of carbonnades, stoemp, and mussels to sushi.
The Best Nightlife around traditional Belgian beer halls and Art Nouveau cafes.
The Best Arts and Entertainment including the best jazz clubs and rock venues.
The Best Lodging from budget to luxury boutique hotels.
Bruges - a complete section dedicated to Bruges, touring the magical canals, the cafes of the Markt square, Michelangelo's Madonna and Child in the Onze-Lieve-Vrouwe-Kerk and lace-making at the Kantcentrum, as well as all the town's best hotels, restaurants and shops.
Helpful tips and all you need to know to make the most of your trip.
Maps to accompany every tour as well as a fold-out map in a plastic case.




From the Book: Beer in Brussels

Photo by MaggieMay25/Frommers.com Community, Belgium Beer Weekend
Brussels is the center of Belgium's huge beer industry, where the alcohol content is high and the varieties are plentiful.

Where to Drink: Head to local watering holes, such as the Puppet Cellar at Poechenellekelder, the historic Mort Subite and Delirium, which serves more than 2,000 types of beer: Le Bier Circus, Le Falstaff, and Le Cirio are also popular haunts offering Belgian blondes, browns, reds and everything in between (beers, not women). Experience 225 beers at the annual Belgium Beer Weekend each September. This year falls over Labor Day weekend (Sept. 3-5).

Average price for a beer: €3.50

Pick up a copy of “Frommer's Brussels and Bruges Day By Day” for more tips.

86% (13)
Trans Canadian Airlines Vickers Vanguard CF-TKB
Trans Canadian Airlines Vickers Vanguard CF-TKB
# I have the original photograph, it was sent me by Trans-Canada Airlines, after I wrote to their London office requesting one. Vickers Vanguard From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Type 950 Vanguard was a British short/medium-range turboprop airliner introduced in 1959 by Vickers-Armstrongs, a development of their successful Viscount design with considerably more internal room. The Vanguard was introduced just before the first of the large jet-powered airliners, and was largely ignored by the market. Only 44 were built, ordered by Trans-Canada Airlines (TCA) and British European Airways (BEA). After only about 10 years service TCA experimentally converted one of theirs to a freighter configuration, calling it the Cargoliner. This was considered successful, and in the early 1970s most were converted to freighters, those from BEA becoming the Merchantman. These freighters remained in service for many years, with the last one (G-APEP) only retiring in 1996. Development The aircraft was designed to a BEA requirement for a 100-seat aircraft to replace their Viscounts. The original Type 870 design was then modified when TCA expressed their interest in the design as well, and Vickers returned the updated Type 950 that filled both requirements. The main difference between the Viscount and Vanguard was the construction of the fuselage. The Vanguard started with the original Viscount fuselage, but cut it off about half of the way up from the bottom, and replaced the top section with a larger-diameter fuselage to give it a double bubble cross-section (similar to the Boeing Stratocruiser). The result of the larger upper portion was a roomier interior, with increased cargo capacity below the floor. With this larger, and heavier, fuselage came the need for a new engine to lift it. Rolls-Royce delivered their new Tyne design with a nominal 4,000 hp/3,000 kW (as compared to the Viscount's Dart of about 1,700 hp/1,300 kW). This allowed for a much higher service ceiling and cruising speed, the Vanguard had a service ceiling almost twice that of the Viscount. The Vanguard was one of the fastest turboprops ever and was faster than the present day Saab 2000 or de Havilland Canada Dash 8. The first Type 950 prototype flew on 20 January 1959. Operational service The Vanguard entered service with BEA and TCA in late 1960. BEA operated their first Vanguard schedule on 17 December from Heathrow to Paris. Following delivery of their full fleet of six V951 and 14 V953 aircraft by 30 March 1962, the type took over many of BEAs busier European and UK trunk routes. The aircraft received names of famous Royal Navy warships, the first G-APEA was named "Vanguard", but these tended to be dropped later in service. Initial seating was 18 first-class at the rear and 108 tourist, but this was changed to 139 all-tourist, in which configuration, the Vanguard had very low operating costs per seat/mile. On flights up to 300 mi (480 km), such as from London to Paris, Brussels and Amsterdam, the type could match the block times of the pure jets which were being introduced in the early 1960s. The remaining BEA fleet passed to British Airways on 1 April 1974 and the last BA passenger flight with the type was on 16 June.[1] TCA initiated Vanguard schedules on 1 February 1961 with two flights from Toronto and Montreal via intermediate stops to Vancouver. The fleet was also used on services from Toronto and Montreal to New York and Nassau, Bahamas.[2] [edit] Cargo operations V953C Merchantman of British Airways Cargo at Manchester in 1978In 1966 Air Canada removed all the seats in CF-TKK and refitted the aircraft for pure cargo work, in which role it could carry 42,000 lb (19,050 kg) of freight. Known by the airline as the "Cargoliner," it was the only such conversion, but survived to be the last Canadian Vanguard to be retired in December 1972.[3] BEA operated nine Vanguards mofified to a V953C "Merchantman" all-cargo layout from 1969, with the first two conversions being designed and carried out by Aviation Traders Engineering (ATL) at Southend Airport. BEA modified the remainder at Heathrow using kits from ATL. A large forward cargo door (139 in/353 cm by 80 in/203 cm high) was incorporated. The Merchantmen continued in service with BA until late 1979 when the remaining five were sold.[4] The last Merchantman was retired by Hunting Cargo Airlines on 30 September 1996 and donated to Brooklands Museum on 17 October 1996. Accidents and Incidents On 27 October 1965 British European Airways Vickers Vanguard G-APEE flying from Edinburgh Airport to London Heathrow Airport, during a landing in poor visibility, attempted an overshoot but crashed on runway 28R. All on board died, 6 crew and 30 passengers.[5] On 2 October 1971 British European Airways Flight 706. operated by Vickers Vanguard G-APEC crashed near Aarsele in Belgium. The cause was the failure of the rear pressure bulkhead
Scandanavian Airlines System Caravelle
Scandanavian Airlines System Caravelle
# I still have the original postcard, it was sent me when I wrote to SAS London office. SAS medium range Caravelle jetliner serves the most important cities in Europe and the Middle East Sud Aviation Caravelle From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Sud Aviation SE 210 Caravelle was the first short/medium-range jet airliner, produced by the French Sud Aviation firm starting in 1955 (when it was still known as SNCASE). The Caravelle would go on to be one of the more successful European first generation jetliners, selling throughout Europe and even penetrating the United States market, with an order for 20 from United Airlines.[1] The Caravelle established the aft-mounted-engine, clean-wing design that has since been used on a wide variety of subsequent aircraft.[1] Design and development On 12 October 1951 the Comite du Materiel Civil (civil aircraft committee) published a specification for a medium range aircraft, which was later sent to the industry by the Direction Technique et Industrielle. This called for an aircraft carrying 55 to 65 passengers and 1,000 kg (2,200 lb) of cargo on routes up to 2,000 km (1,100 nmi; 1,200 mi) with a cruise speed about 600 km/h (320 kn; 370 mph). The type and number of engines was not specified. Various design studies for aircraft in this category had been underway since 1946 by several of the leading French aircraft manufacturing organisations, but none had the financial power to start construction.[1] Response from the French industry was strong, with every major manufacturer sending in at least one proposal, and a total of 20 different designs were received. Most of the proposals used all-turbojet power, although Breguet entered a number of designs for both turbojet and turboprop types; among these was one for an Atar-powered tri-jet to be developed in association with the SNCA du Nord and a turboprop type, all known as Br. 978. Hurel-Dubois entered several turboprop designs based on a narrow fuselage and shoulder mounted wing similar to many regional propliners. Proposals from the SNCA du Sud-Ouest included the S.O.60 with two Rolls-Royce Avon RA.7 engines, with two smaller Turbomeca Marbores as auxiliaries. SNCA du Sud-Est returned a number of designs from the X-200 to X-210, all of them pure-jet.[1] After studying the various entries, the Comite du Materiel Civil cut the list to three entrants on 28 March 1952: the four-engined Avon/Marbore S.0.60, the twin-Avon Hurel-Dubois project, and the three-Avon Sud-Est X-210. At this point Rolls-Royce started offering a new version of the Avon that could develop 9,000 lbf (40 kN) thrust, making the auxiliary engines on the S.O.60 and the third engine on the X-210 unnecessary.[1] The Committee requested SNCASE re-submit the X-210 as a twin-Avon design. In doing so they decided not to bother moving the remaining engines from their rear-mounted position; most designs mounted the engines under the wing where they can be mounted on the spar for lower overall weight, but SNCASE felt the savings were not worth the effort. This turned out to be a benefit to the design, as the cabin noise was greatly reduced. The revised X-210 design with twin Avons was re-submitted to the SGACC in July 1952.[1] Two months later the SNCASE received official notification that its design had been accepted. On 6 July 1953 the SGACC ordered two prototypes and two static airframes for fatigue testing. Sud's design licensed several fuselage features from de Havilland, a company Sud had dealings with for several earlier designs. The nose area and cockpit layout were both taken directly from the de Havilland Comet, while the rest of the plane was locally designed.[1] Detail of the Rolls-Royce Avon turbojet enginesThe first prototype of the Caravelle (F-WHHH), christened by Madame de Gaulle, was rolled out on 21 April 1955, and flew on 27 May powered by two British Rolls-Royce RA-26 Mk.522 with 4,536 kgf (44,480 N; 10,000 lbf) of unitary thrust. The crew was composed by Pierre Nadot (first officer), Andre Moynot (second officer), Jean Avril (mechanic), Andre Preneron (radio operator) and Roger Beteille. The flight duration was 41 minutes. The second prototype flew a year later on 6 May 1956. The first prototype had a cargo door on the lower left side of the fuselage, but this was removed in the second prototype for an all-seating arrangement. The first order was from Air France in 1956, followed by SAS in 1957. That year Sud-Est merged with Sud-Ouest to become Sud Aviation, but the original SE naming was retained. More orders followed, mainly triggered by presentations on airshows and demonstrations to potential customers. The Caravelle was certified in May 1959 and shortly afterwards entered service with SAS and Air France.[1] Several models were produced over the lifetime of the production run, as the power of the available engines grew and allowed for higher takeoff weights. By this time most of Sud Av

flights from london to brussels
flights from london to brussels
Brussels Sights 2011: a travel guide to the top 30 attractions in Brussels, Belgium (Mobi Sights)
This illustrated Travel Guide is a part of the Mobi Sights series, our concise guides that only feature the most essential information on city attractions. This guide is designed for optimal navigation on eReaders, smartphones, and other mobile electronic devices. Inside you will find a locator map and a list of top attractions linked to individual articles. Addresses, telephones, hours of operation and admissions information are included. This travel guide also features an itinerary with our suggestions for your travel route. Itineraries include links to individual attraction articles.

Please search for "Travel Brussels," part of the Mobi Travel series, if you are interested in the complete travel guide that includes more maps and attractions with additional articles on history, cultural venues, transportation, districts, dining, accommodations, units conversion, and a phrasebook.

NEW FEATURE: The attraction articles now include links to Google Maps. On a dedicated electronic reader with a slow connection and a primitive browser, Google Maps will display the attraction on the map along with metro stations, roads, and nearby attractions. On an internet-enabled device such as the iPhone and the iPad, Google Maps will even show you the route from your current location to the attraction you want to go to.

With this travel guide you can turn some eReaders into an audio guides. For example, on the Kindle, just open an article and click Shift+SYM to activate text-to-speech. Put the speaker on the back of the Kindle against your ear and enjoy your virtual travel companion. Press Spacebar to pause/resume text-to-speech.

All travel guides in the Mobi Sights series are only $0.99. Search for any title: enter mobi (short for MobileReference) and a keyword; for example: mobi Paris.

This illustrated Travel Guide is a part of the Mobi Sights series, our concise guides that only feature the most essential information on city attractions. This guide is designed for optimal navigation on eReaders, smartphones, and other mobile electronic devices. Inside you will find a locator map and a list of top attractions linked to individual articles. Addresses, telephones, hours of operation and admissions information are included. This travel guide also features an itinerary with our suggestions for your travel route. Itineraries include links to individual attraction articles.

Please search for "Travel Brussels," part of the Mobi Travel series, if you are interested in the complete travel guide that includes more maps and attractions with additional articles on history, cultural venues, transportation, districts, dining, accommodations, units conversion, and a phrasebook.

NEW FEATURE: The attraction articles now include links to Google Maps. On a dedicated electronic reader with a slow connection and a primitive browser, Google Maps will display the attraction on the map along with metro stations, roads, and nearby attractions. On an internet-enabled device such as the iPhone and the iPad, Google Maps will even show you the route from your current location to the attraction you want to go to.

With this travel guide you can turn some eReaders into an audio guides. For example, on the Kindle, just open an article and click Shift+SYM to activate text-to-speech. Put the speaker on the back of the Kindle against your ear and enjoy your virtual travel companion. Press Spacebar to pause/resume text-to-speech.

All travel guides in the Mobi Sights series are only $0.99. Search for any title: enter mobi (short for MobileReference) and a keyword; for example: mobi Paris.

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