FLIGHT SAFETY MAINTENANCE TRAINING : FLIGHT SAFETY

FLIGHT SAFETY MAINTENANCE TRAINING : PAST FLIGHT INFORMATION : ASIANA AIRLINES FLIGHT ATTENDANT.

Flight Safety Maintenance Training


flight safety maintenance training
    flight safety
  • Air safety is a term encompassing the theory, investigation and categorization of flight failures, and the prevention of such failures through regulation, education and training. It can also be applied in the context of campaigns that inform the public as to the safety of air travel.
    maintenance
  • care: activity involved in maintaining something in good working order; "he wrote the manual on car care"
  • The process of maintaining or preserving someone or something, or the state of being maintained
  • The provision of financial support for a person's living expenses, or the support so provided
  • means of maintenance of a family or group
  • alimony: court-ordered support paid by one spouse to another after they are separated
  • The process of keeping something in good condition
    training
  • activity leading to skilled behavior
  • The action of teaching a person or animal a particular skill or type of behavior
  • (trained) shaped or conditioned or disciplined by training; often used as a combining form; "a trained mind"; "trained pigeons"; "well-trained servants"
  • The action of undertaking a course of exercise and diet in preparation for a sporting event
  • education: the result of good upbringing (especially knowledge of correct social behavior); "a woman of breeding and refinement"
flight safety maintenance training - Why Hospitals
Why Hospitals Should Fly: The Ultimate Flight Plan to Patient Safety and Quality Care
Why Hospitals Should Fly: The Ultimate Flight Plan to Patient Safety and Quality Care
"This book is a tour de force, and no one but John Nance could have written it. He, alone, masters in one mind the fields of aviation, health care safety, medical malpractice law, organizational sociology, media communication, and, as if that were not enough, the art of fine writing. Only he could have made sophisticated, scientifically disciplined instruction about the nature and roots of safety into a page-turner. Medical care has a ton yet to learn from the decades of progress that have brought aviation to unprecedented levels of safety, and, in instructing us all about those lessons, John Nance is not just a bridge-builder - he is the bridge. This book should be required reading for anyone willing to face the facts about what it will take for health care to be as safe as it truly can be." Donald M. Berwick, MD, MPP President and CEO Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI)

"This book is a tour de force, and no one but John Nance could have written it. He, alone, masters in one mind the fields of aviation, health care safety, medical malpractice law, organizational sociology, media communication, and, as if that were not enough, the art of fine writing. Only he could have made sophisticated, scientifically disciplined instruction about the nature and roots of safety into a page-turner. Medical care has a ton yet to learn from the decades of progress that have brought aviation to unprecedented levels of safety, and, in instructing us all about those lessons, John Nance is not just a bridge-builder - he is the bridge. This book should be required reading for anyone willing to face the facts about what it will take for health care to be as safe as it truly can be." Donald M. Berwick, MD, MPP President and CEO Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI)

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The Triad of Golden Knights
The Triad of Golden Knights
The United States Army Parachute Team, nicknamed and commonly known as the Golden Knights, is a demonstration and competition parachute team of the United States Army. It consists of demonstration and competition Parachutist teams, drawn from US Army Paratroopers who have demonstrated excellence in their parachuting skills. History The Golden Knights evolved from an informal STRAC or Strategic Army Corps Sport Parachute Team, which was originally conceptualized by Brigadier General Joseph Stilwell. The original STRAC team consisted of 19 military parachutists. This unofficial unit competed successfully in parachute competitions, provided assistance to the military in the development of modern parachuting techniques and equipment, and provided support for Army public relations and recruiting. The team also participated in international parachuting competitions in an attempt to thwart the Soviets in their quest for dominance of the world parachuting arena. In 1959, the team and was formally recognized and later designated as the Army's official aerial demonstration unit on June 1, 1961. Unit Organization The United States Army Parachute Team is directly subordinate to the United States Army Accessions Command, Headquartered at Ft. Knox, KY. The US Army Accessions Command also controls such organizations as the US Army Marksmanship Unit, the Army Sports Program, and other elements involved with public relations and increasing the public's favorable awareness of the US Army. The parachute team is garrisoned at Ft. Bragg, NC, and has several dedicated facilities in the area. These facilities include: an aviation support facility, a team headquarters facility and a dedicated team drop zone. The team itself is composed of approximately 95 men and women and divided into several smaller task-oriented sub-units, also called teams or sections. The support elements include: an Aviation Section, a Headquarters section, a Media Relations Section, and a Supply Section. The adminsitrative and support personnel make up about half of the unit's end strength, and provide invaluable logistical support for the demonstrators and competitors as they perform their duties in the US and abroad. The team's operational elements include: two Demonstration Teams, a 4-way Relative Work Team, a Style and Accuracy Team, a Tandem Section and most recently, a Canopy Swoop Team. Demonstration Teams The two Golden Knight demonstration teams travel the United States(and occasionally overseas)performing for public audiences at venues ranging from relatively small civic events, to nationally and internationally televised events (such as Monday Night Football games, NASCAR races and large International airshows). The two, 12-member teams travel approximately 240 days per calendar year, and use the team's two C-31 Friendship jump aircraft as their primary means of transportation, and sometimes the De Havilland Canada UV-18A Twin Otter. There are two demonstration teams, affectionately dubbed the Gold Team and Black Team, in reference to the official Army colors. Team members come from a variety of backgrounds in one of the 150 jobs available in the US Army. Each team has a team leader, who typically has the most time and experience performing demonstration jumps and is typically holds the rank of an Army Sergeant First Class (SFC). The 24 demonstrator positions on the team are typically held for at least three consecutive years. At the end of their tenure, soldiers will then either rotate back to Army line units or they may request to stay with the team for an additional period in one of several specialty positions. These positions are usually reserved for tandem parachute instructors, videographers, team leaders and competition parachutists. The demonstration teams perform several types of shows; each is performed to exacting standards of practice but can also be tailored to the specific venue. These shows range from jumpers exiting the aircraft and landing in a major-league stadium, to more involved 20 or 30 minute aerial displays. The 20 minute Mass Exit show consists of multiple jumpers exiting the aircraft and forming a geometric shape, often with smoke canisters employed for additional crowd effect. The 30 minute Full Show consists of several aircraft passes or "jump runs"; with each pass consisting of one or more jumpers exiting and then performing exciting and somewhat unusual parachuting techniques. Once safely on the ground, the jumpers traditionally perform a ground line-up, in which each jumper is introduced and then the team will usually present a team memento to a distinguished selectee from the show audience. Each maneuver the Knights perform is executed with the enjoyment and safety of the audience being the paramount concerns. As a testament to their professionalism and skill, the Golden Knights enjoy an unparalleled safety record in the professional parachuting arena. For those wishing to become one of the few
Série com Parapente - Series with Paragliding - paraglidingé 10-05-2008 432
Série com Parapente - Series with Paragliding - paraglidingé 10-05-2008 432
A Text, in english, from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Paragliding is a recreational and competitive flying sport. A paraglider is a free-flying, foot-launched aircraft. The pilot sits in a harness suspended below a fabric wing, whose shape is formed by the pressure of air entering vents in the front of the wing. n 1954, Walter Neumark predicted (in an article in Flight magazine) a time when a glider pilot would be “able to launch himself by running over the edge of a cliff or down a slope … whether on a rock-climbing holiday in Skye or ski-ing in the Alps”.[1] In 1961, the French engineer Pierre Lemoigne produced improved parachute designs which led to the Para-Commander (‘PC’), which had cut-outs at the rear and sides which enabled it to be towed into the air and steered – leading to parasailing/parascending. Sometimes credited with the greatest development in parachutes since Leonardo da Vinci, the American Domina Jalbert invented in 1964 the Parafoil which had sectioned cells in an aerofoil shape; an open leading edge and a closed trailing edge, inflated by passage through the air – the ram-air design.[2] Meanwhile, David Barish was developing the Sail Wing for recovery of NASA space capsules – “slope soaring was a way of testing out … the Sail Wing”.[3] After tests on Hunter Mountain, New York in September 1965, he went on to promote ‘slope soaring’ as a summer activity for ski resorts (apparently without great success).[4] NASA originated the term ‘paraglider’ in the early 1960’s, and ‘paragliding’ was first used in the early 1970’s to describe foot-launching of gliding parachutes. Author Walter Neumark wrote Operating Procedures for Ascending Parachutes, and he and a group of enthusiasts with a passion for tow-launching ‘PCs’ and ram-air parachutes eventually broke away from the British Parachute Association to form the British Association of Parascending Clubs (BAPC) in 1973. These threads were pulled together in June 1978 by three friends Jean-Claude Betemps, Andre Bohn and Gerard Bosson from Mieussy Haute-Savoie, France. After inspiration from an article on ‘slope soaring’ in the Parachute Manual magazine by parachutist & publisher Dan Poynter,[5] they calculated that on a suitable slope, a ‘square’ ram-air parachute could be inflated by running down the slope; Betemps launched from Pointe du Pertuiset, Mieussy, and flew 100 m. Bohn followed him and glided down to the football pitch in the valley 1000 metres below.[6] ‘Parapente’ (pente being French for slope) was born. Through the 1980’s and since, it has been a story of constantly improving equipment and ever greater numbers of paragliding pilots. The first World Championship was held in Kossen, Austria in 1989. he paraglider wing or canopy is known in aeronautical engineering as a ram-air airfoil, or parafoil. Such wings comprise two layers of fabric which are connected to internal supporting material in such a way as to form a row of cells. By leaving most of the cells open only at the leading edge, incoming air (ram-air pressure) keeps the wing inflated, thus maintaining its shape. When inflated, the wing's cross-section has the typical teardrop aerofoil shape. The pilot is supported underneath the wing by a network of lines. The lines are gathered into two sets as left and right risers. The risers collect the lines in rows from front to back in either 3 or 4 rows. The risers are connected to the pilot's harness by two carabiners. Paraglider wings typically have an area of 20-35 m? with a span of 8–12 m, and weigh 3–7 kg. Combined weight of wing, harness, reserve, instruments, helmet, etc. is around 12–18 kg. The glide ratio of paragliders ranges from 8:1 for recreational wings, to about 11:1 for modern competition models. For comparison, a typical skydiving parachute will achieve about 3:1 glide. A hang glider will achieve about 15:1 glide. An idling (gliding) Cessna 152 will achieve 9:1. Some sailplanes can achieve a glide ratio of up to 60:1. The speed range of paragliders is typically 20–50 km/h (12-30 mph), from stall speed to maximum speed. Beginner wings will be in the lower part of this range, high-performance wings in the upper part of the range. The range for safe flying will be somewhat smaller. Modern paraglider wings are made of high-performance non-porous fabrics such as Porcher Sport & Gelvenor, with Dyneema/Spectra or Kevlar/Aramid lines. For storage and carrying, the wing is usually folded into a rucksack (bag), which can then be stowed in a large backpack along with the harness. For pilots who may not want the added weight or fuss of a backpack, the harness itself can be used to carry the wing, though this is less comfortable, and thus less favorable for longer hikes. In this case the wing (within the rucksack) is buckled into the harness seat, which is then slung over the shoulders. Recent developments in light-weight harness design include the ability to turn the harness inside out such that it becomes the back

flight safety maintenance training
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