Group Lesson Plan

RET-Nano 2009:  Group Lesson Plan

 

Group Members:  Kelly McCarthy, Aileen Constans

 

Lesson Plan Title:  Nanotechnology and World Energy

 

Nanotech Concept/Topic to Teach:  Nanotechnology and manufacturing.

 

Standards Addressed:

·         Science and technology in local, national, and global challenges

·         Structure and properties of matter

·         Conservation of energy/Interactions of energy and matter

 

General Goals/Objective:

·         Students will be able to explain the impact of nanotechnology on the development of an alternative energy resource.

·         Students will be able to construct nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells and compare their power output to commercial solar cells.

 

Required Materials: 

 

Article on Solar Cells

Berries (raspberries, blueberries, and/or blackberries)

Binder Clips

Acetic Acid

Hot Plate/Oven/Flame

Conductive Glass Slides

Nanocrystalline Solar Cell Kit

 

Anticipatory Set:

 

·         Powerpoint slides and notes on the limited availability of current energy sources (oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear) and solar energy as a possible alternative.

·         Tentatively:  provide students with an article about silicon solar cells/list of questions about cost, availability, time issues

·         Notes—new inexpensive material for solar cells:  Titanium Dioxide, a suspension of NANOPARTICLES

 

Activities:

 

·         What is nano?  Introduction to definition of nanotechnology; paper cutting activity and “number line” activity.

·         Discussion of  number line:  (i.e., a molecule is smaller than a nanoparticle although we still are not able to see or feel a nanoparticle without very special tools).

·         Explain that “Scientists have already mixed nanoparticles into the chemical compound we will be using to create our inexpensive solar cells throughout this lab.”

·         Assessment:  Mini-quiz on “what is nano?” and world energy powerpoint

·         Discussion of quiz

·         Lab activity:  follow procedure outlined in solar cell kit.

 

Independent Practice and Analysis:

 

Each lab group will be able to choose from a combination of the following activites for a certain amount of points*:

·         Effect of different light sources on the output of solar cells

·         Effect of connecting homemade solar cells in series . . . in parallel

·         How many solar cells need to be connected to light a light bulb

·         Use variable resistors and a voltmeter to record the I-V curves for each solar cell.

·         Demonstrate Ohm’s Law

·         Measure the Current vs. Power Density

·         Storing Solar Energy using a Capacitor

 

* Extension for gifted students:  Each of the above activities will be worth a certain amount of points and students must be working the full time so if they finish early they will move on to a new activity of their choice.

 

Closure:

 

Class discussion of questions to cover results from lab, “what is nanotech”, “world energy”.   Which material used to create your solar cell is an example of nanotechnology or a nanomaterial?

 

Assessment:

 

Post-Lab Assessment: Quiz or mini-test (Quest or Twizz):

Questions (multiple choice, short answer, 1 Ohm’s Law problem/power density problem).

                   

Writing assignment:  Compare and Contrast Nanotech solar cells with Silicon solar cells based on readings and results from lab.

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GroupLessonPlan.docx
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ajconstans@yahoo.com,
Jul 31, 2009, 6:41 AM
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